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Article

Mark Jones

(b Bordeaux, Nov 4, 1761; d Paris, Dec 10, 1822).

French medallist, engraver and illustrator. He was first apprenticed to the medallist André Lavau (d 1808) and then attended the Académie de Peinture et de Sculpture in Bordeaux. In 1786 he travelled to Paris and entered the workshop of Nicolas-Marie Gatteaux. His first great success was a large, realistic and highly detailed medal representing the Fall of the Bastille (1789); because it would have been difficult and risky to strike, he produced it in the form of single-sided lead impressions or clichés, coloured to resemble bronze. The following year he used this novel technique again, to produce an equally successful companion piece illustrating the Arrival of Louis XVI in Paris. Andrieu lay low during the latter part of the French Revolution, engraving vignettes and illustrating an edition of Virgil by Firmin Didot (1764–1836). He reappeared in 1800, with medals of the Passage of the Great St Bernard...

Article

Philip Ward-Jackson

(b London, June 18, 1828; d London, Dec 4, 1905).

English sculptor, silversmith and illustrator. He was the son of a chaser and attended the Royal Academy Schools, London. At first he gave his attention equally to silverwork and to sculpture, exhibiting at the Royal Academy from 1851. An early bronze, St Michael and the Serpent, cast in 1852 for the Art Union, shows him conversant with the style of continental Romantics, and his debut in metalwork coincided with the introduction into England of virtuoso repoussé work by the Frenchman, Antoine Vechte (1799–1868). In the Outram Shield (London, V&A), Armstead displayed the full gamut of low-relief effects in silver, but its reception at the Royal Academy in 1862 disappointed him, and he turned his attention to monumental sculpture. Among a number of fruitful collaborations with architects, that with George Gilbert I Scott (ii) included a high degree of responsibility for the sculpture on the Albert Memorial in Kensington Gardens, London. Here Armstead’s main contribution was the execution of half of the podium frieze (...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 25 November 1868, in Bordeaux; died 27 June 1947, in Paris.

Sculptor, illustrator. Statues, busts, medals.

Having chosen an artistic career, Léon Blanchot left university to train as a sculptor at the École des Beaux-Arts in Bordeaux, then went to Paris and settled there. He regularly took part in the Salon des Artistes Français, and became a member of this society. His main works are ...

Article

Philip Attwood

(b Munich, Feb 28, 1865; d Oberammergau, Aug 17, 1954).

German painter, medallist, designer and illustrator. He trained as a painter in the Munich Akademie from 1884, and initially won fame in this art with large decorative schemes on mythological or religious themes (e.g. Bacchanal, c. 1888; Munich, Villa Schülein) and portraits painted in a broad, realistic manner (e.g. Elise Meier-Siel, 1889; Munich, Schack-Gal.). He taught at the Munich Kunstgewerbeschule from 1902 to 1910. In 1905 he taught himself die-engraving and began making struck and cast medals, producing in all some 200, which combine his decorative abilities with the harsher style of his younger contemporaries (e.g. the bronze medal of Anton von Knoezinger, 1907; see 1985 exh. cat., no. 23). In 1907 and 1927 he produced models for coinage. Dasio also worked as a poster designer and book illustrator, as well as designing for stained glass and jewellery. The decorative symbolism of his earlier work in black and white (e.g. the cover for ...

Article

Austrian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 14 November 1859, in Baden, near Vienna; died 9 April 1925, in Vienna.

Painter, sculptor, medallist, illustrator. Religious subjects, figures, landscapes.

Johannes Mayerhofer studied at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna and worked mainly on decorations for churches....

Article

Italian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 8th January 1857, in Milan; died 1950.

Painter, sculptor, illustrator, medallist.

Pogliaghi sculpted numerous monuments, statues and ornaments for the churches and public buildings of northern Italy.

Milan (Pinacoteca di Brera): The Chapel of St Joseph in the Church of Ste-Marie de la Paix...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 18 July 1823, in Paris; died 7 May 1902, in Coupvray (Seine-et-Marne).

Sculptor, medallist, illustrator. Statues.

Jean Joules Salmson's teachers were Dumont, Ramey and Toussaint. He made his Salon debut in 1859, and won second-class medals in 1863 and 1867...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in the USA.

Born 25 June 1871, in Le Havre.

Painter, sculptor, medallist, illustrator.

Theodore Spicer-Simson lived and worked in New York and studied in England, Germany and at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, becoming a member of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts in ...