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Article

Mark Jones

(b Bordeaux, Nov 4, 1761; d Paris, Dec 10, 1822).

French medallist, engraver and illustrator. He was first apprenticed to the medallist André Lavau (d 1808) and then attended the Académie de Peinture et de Sculpture in Bordeaux. In 1786 he travelled to Paris and entered the workshop of Nicolas-Marie Gatteaux. His first great success was a large, realistic and highly detailed medal representing the Fall of the Bastille (1789); because it would have been difficult and risky to strike, he produced it in the form of single-sided lead impressions or clichés, coloured to resemble bronze. The following year he used this novel technique again, to produce an equally successful companion piece illustrating the Arrival of Louis XVI in Paris. Andrieu lay low during the latter part of the French Revolution, engraving vignettes and illustrating an edition of Virgil by Firmin Didot (1764–1836). He reappeared in 1800, with medals of the Passage of the Great St Bernard...

Article

Antico  

Italian, 15th – 16th century, male.

Born c. 1460; died 1528, in Bózzolo.

Goldsmith, sculptor, medallist, copyist. Statues, statuettes.

Antico was from Mantua and went to Rome in 1495 and 1497. His first commission was in 1479, for a pair of medals commemorating the wedding of Gianfranceso Gonzaga to Antonia del Banzo. His first visit to Rome, in ...

Article

Philip Ward-Jackson

(b London, June 18, 1828; d London, Dec 4, 1905).

English sculptor, silversmith and illustrator. He was the son of a chaser and attended the Royal Academy Schools, London. At first he gave his attention equally to silverwork and to sculpture, exhibiting at the Royal Academy from 1851. An early bronze, St Michael and the Serpent, cast in 1852 for the Art Union, shows him conversant with the style of continental Romantics, and his debut in metalwork coincided with the introduction into England of virtuoso repoussé work by the Frenchman, Antoine Vechte (1799–1868). In the Outram Shield (London, V&A), Armstead displayed the full gamut of low-relief effects in silver, but its reception at the Royal Academy in 1862 disappointed him, and he turned his attention to monumental sculpture. Among a number of fruitful collaborations with architects, that with George Gilbert I Scott (ii) included a high degree of responsibility for the sculpture on the Albert Memorial in Kensington Gardens, London. Here Armstead’s main contribution was the execution of half of the podium frieze (...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 25 November 1868, in Bordeaux; died 27 June 1947, in Paris.

Sculptor, illustrator. Statues, busts, medals.

Having chosen an artistic career, Léon Blanchot left university to train as a sculptor at the École des Beaux-Arts in Bordeaux, then went to Paris and settled there. He regularly took part in the Salon des Artistes Français, and became a member of this society. His main works are ...

Article

Czech, 20th century, male.

Active from 1912 in France; naturalised from 1926.

Born 22 October 1883, in Boskovice; died 17 October 1969, in Marseilles, France.

Painter, engraver (etching), illustrator, sculptor. Figures, nudes, landscapes with figures, still-lifes (flowers). Busts, low reliefs, medals.

Osma Group (The Eight)...

Article

Mark Jones

French family of medallists. Philippe Danfrie the elder (b 1531–5; d Paris, 1606) went to Paris in the 1550s and set up as an engraver of letter punches. He produced a number of books in partnership with Richard Breton in 1558–60 and later with Pierre Haman and Jean Le Royer. He also made mathematical instruments, globes and astrolabes and dies for marking bookbindings. In 1571 he cut his first dies for jettons. As Engraver-General of the French coinage from 1582, he provided the puncheons from which the dies used in every mint in France were taken. He also produced a number of medals (e.g. London, BM) commemorating the events of the first 15 years of Henry IV’s reign. His son Philippe Danfrie the younger (b ?Paris, c. 1572; d Paris, 1604) was appointed Controller-General of effigies in 1591. On his appointment it was claimed that he had demonstrated great skill in modelling portraits in wax and engraving puncheons. His most famous and only signed medal (e.g. London, BM) is cast rather than struck and celebrates the victory of Henry IV over the Duke of Savoy in ...

Article

Philip Attwood

(b Munich, Feb 28, 1865; d Oberammergau, Aug 17, 1954).

German painter, medallist, designer and illustrator. He trained as a painter in the Munich Akademie from 1884, and initially won fame in this art with large decorative schemes on mythological or religious themes (e.g. Bacchanal, c. 1888; Munich, Villa Schülein) and portraits painted in a broad, realistic manner (e.g. Elise Meier-Siel, 1889; Munich, Schack-Gal.). He taught at the Munich Kunstgewerbeschule from 1902 to 1910. In 1905 he taught himself die-engraving and began making struck and cast medals, producing in all some 200, which combine his decorative abilities with the harsher style of his younger contemporaries (e.g. the bronze medal of Anton von Knoezinger, 1907; see 1985 exh. cat., no. 23). In 1907 and 1927 he produced models for coinage. Dasio also worked as a poster designer and book illustrator, as well as designing for stained glass and jewellery. The decorative symbolism of his earlier work in black and white (e.g. the cover for ...

Article

French, 20th century, female.

Born 8 May 1939, in Paris.

Painter, sculptor, draughtswoman, medallist, illustrator. Animals.

Marie-Joseph Devaux is a graduate of the École des Arts Décoratifs, the École Estienne, the École du Louvre and the École des Hautes Études, and is proficient in Latin, Greek, Hebrew and Egyptian hieroglyphics. She has taught at the Arts Décoratifs in Paris, worked in the Egyptian antiquities department and the Oriental department of the Louvre, and given courses at the École Estienne. She has been a teacher of the fine arts in secondary education since ...

Article

Francesco Paolo Fiore and Pietro C. Marani

(Pollaiolo) [Francesco di Giorgio]

(b Siena, bapt Sept 23, 1439; d Siena, bur Nov 29, 1501).

Italian architect, engineer, painter, illuminator, sculptor, medallist, theorist and writer. He was the most outstanding artistic personality from Siena in the second half of the 15th century. His activities as a diplomat led to his employment at the courts of Naples, Milan and Urbino, as well as in Siena, and while most of his paintings and miniatures date from before 1475, by the 1480s and 1490s he was among the leading architects in Italy. He was particularly renowned for his work as a military architect, notably for his involvement in the development of the Bastion, which formed the basis of post-medieval fortifications (see Military architecture & fortification, §III, 2(ii) and 4(ii)). His subsequent palace and church architecture was influential in spreading the Urbino style, which he renewed with reference to the architecture of Leon Battista Alberti but giving emphasis to the purism of smooth surfaces. His theoretical works, which include the first important Western writings on military engineering, were not published until modern times but were keenly studied in manuscript, by Leonardo da Vinci among others; they foreshadowed a number of developments that came to fruition in the 16th century (...

Article

Belgian, 20th century, male.

Born 1919, in Etterbeek (Brussels).

Painter, sculptor, medallist, ceramicist, draughtsman, decorative designer, illustrator. Designs for tapestries.

Roger Duterme studied at the Etterbeek school of industrial art and design, and the Academy of St Luke in Brussels, where he later taught drawing. He became director of the École des Arts in Ixelles. He made large decorative panels for the Pavillon du St-Siège at the ...

Article

Danielle B. Joyner

From the time John Cassian established the first female foundation in Marseille in ad 410, monastic women lived in varying states of enclosure and were surrounded by diverse images and objects that contributed to their devotion, education and livelihood. The first rule for women, written in 512 by St Caesarius of Arles, emphasized their strict separation from men and the world, as did the Periculoso, a directive issued by Pope Boniface VIII (reg 1294–1303) in 1298. Various architectural solutions developed throughout the Middle Ages to reconcile the necessities of enclosure with the access required by male clerics to celebrate Mass and provide pastoral care. Nuns’ choirs, where the women would gather for their daily prayers, were often constructed as discreet spaces in the church, which allowed women to hear or see the Mass without interacting with the cleric, as in the 10th-century choir in the eastern transept gallery at St Cyriakus in Gernrode, Germany. In some Cistercian examples, the nuns’ choir appeared at the west end of the nave. Dominican and Franciscan architecture was largely varied. Double monasteries, which housed men and women, also required careful construction. A 7th-century text describing the church of St Brigida in ...

Article

(d c. 1417–20).

Goldsmith, sculptor, and painter, probably of German origin. None of his works is known to have survived, but he is mentioned twice in mid-15th-century texts: in the second book of Lorenzo Ghiberti’s Commentarii and in the manuscript of the Anonimo Magliabecchiano. Both texts relate that Gusmin died during the reign of Pope Martin (i.e. Martin V, reg 1417–31), in the year of the 438th Olympiad (i.e. between 1415 and 1420). He worked in the service of the Duke of Anjou, who was forced to destroy Gusmin’s greatest work, a golden altar, in order to provide cash for his ‘public needs’. Gusmin consequently retired to a hermitage where he led a saintly life, painting and teaching young artists. Although it is clear from his account that Ghiberti never knew the master or saw any of his original works, he stated that he had seen casts of his sculptures, which, he said, were as fine as the work of the ancient Greeks, although the figures were rather short. There have been numerous attempts to identify Gusmin with artists, both German and Italian, fitting the account of Ghiberti and the Anonimo Magliabecchiano. Swarzenski first named Gusmin as the author of the alabaster Rimini altar (Frankfurt am Main, Liebieghaus), but this has now been demonstrated to be of Netherlandish workmanship. Krautheimer proposed a convincing reconstruction of Gusmin’s career, suggesting that his Angevin patron was ...

Article

Mitsuhiko Hasebe

[Fusajirō]

(b Kyoto, March 23, 1883; d Kanagawa, Dec 21, 1959).

Japanese potter, calligrapher and medallist. At an early age he taught himself seal-carving and calligraphy, for which he won a prize in 1904; soon after he became a commercial calligrapher and medallist. In 1915 he had his first experience of decorating pottery at a kiln in the district of Hokuriku. In 1919 he opened an art shop in Tokyo, and in 1920 he founded the Gourmet’s Club on the second floor of the store, serving food in traditional ceramic vessels that he had himself collected. Kitaōji soon began to produce his own pottery, creating forms drawn from studying the vessels that he used for his cuisine. In 1925 he opened the Gourmet’s Club Hoshigaoka Restaurant in Tokyo. In 1926 he established a studio and kiln known as Hoshigaokayō in Kita Kamakura. He often surpassed the classical forms on which his works were based, becoming well known for his simple but original designs. He used red enamels and gold in his work and was influenced by blue-and-white wares and coloured porcelain from the Ming period (...

Article

Norwegian, 20th century, male.

Born 1870, in Fetsund.

Sculptor, medallist, illustrator. Monuments, busts, statues.

Gustav Laerum illustrated a number of brochures and pamphlets featuring portraits of various personalities in Norway; he also painted several portraits in oils, including those of Björnson and Ibsen. His sculptural work comprises principally tombs, statues, busts and portrait medallions....

Article

Belgian, 20th century, male.

Born 1940, in Bomal-sur-Ourthe.

Sculptor, painter, engraver, medallist, illustrator. Busts.

Marc Laffineur studied in Liège at the Institut Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de St-Luc and the Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts. He aligned himself with the Cap d'Encre group of artists and was a founder member of the St Hubert woodcut engraving studio. As a sculptor, he worked in both wood and metal, assembling strips of meticulously polished wood juxtaposed with highly-polished metal ribbons. As an illustrator, he is noted principally as a medallist. Laffineur was awarded the town of Catania engraving prize....

Article

Spanish, 20th century, male.

Born 1893, in Manresa (Catalonia); died, in Barcelona.

Sculptor, medallist, illustrator.

Jaume Martrus y Riera studied at the academy of fine arts and spent time in France, Switzerland and Italy. In 1923 he journeyed to equatorial Africa, and in 1939 he went abroad again....

Article

Austrian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 14 November 1859, in Baden, near Vienna; died 9 April 1925, in Vienna.

Painter, sculptor, medallist, illustrator. Religious subjects, figures, landscapes.

Johannes Mayerhofer studied at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna and worked mainly on decorations for churches....

Article

Pier Giorgio Pasini

(b Verona, c. 1420; d Rimini, after May 15, 1467).

Italian medallist, architect, painter and illuminator. He came from a good Veronese family (his father was a doctor, two of his brothers were in the church and three others were merchants). He is first documented in 1441, when he was working in Venice as painter to Piero di Cosimo de’ Medici illustrating Petrarch’s Trionfi (untraced). Subsequently (1444–6), he worked as an illuminator for the Este court, under the direction of Giorgio d’Alemagna. None of his works from this period is known.

By 1449 he was resident in Rimini, where he married Elisa di Giovanni Baldigara. There he was joined by Agostino di Duccio and other Venetian sculptors, working on the construction and decoration of two large funerary chapels (1447–c. 1452) for Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta, Lord of Rimini, and his mistress, Isotta degli Atti, in S Francesco (known as the Tempio Malatestiano). Initially Matteo was probably the organizer and supervisor of this project, but ...

Article

British, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 20 April 1967, in Leatherhead (Surrey).

Painter, sculptor, printmaker.

Artist’s books.

Simon Patterson studied at Hertfordshire College of Art and Design (1985–1986) and Goldsmiths College, London (1986–1989). He was nominated for the Turner Prize in ...

Article

Italian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 8th January 1857, in Milan; died 1950.

Painter, sculptor, illustrator, medallist.

Pogliaghi sculpted numerous monuments, statues and ornaments for the churches and public buildings of northern Italy.

Milan (Pinacoteca di Brera): The Chapel of St Joseph in the Church of Ste-Marie de la Paix...