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Article

Jean Selz

Bibliography F. Carco : Vlaminck Paris, 1920) G. Duhamel : Maurice de Vlaminck (Paris, 1927) P. MacOrlan : Vlaminck: Peintures 1900–1945 (Paris, 1945) A. Derain : Lettres à Vlaminck (Paris, 1955) M. Sauvage : Vlaminck: Sa vie et son message (Geneva, 1956) J. Selz : Vlaminck (Paris, 1963) J. E. Muller : Fauvism (New York, 1967) The ‘Wild Beasts’: Fauvism and its Affinities (exh. cat. by J. Elderfield , New York, MOMA; San Francisco, MOMA; Fort Worth, Kimbell A. Mus.; 1976) Vlaminck (exh. cat., Paris, Gal. Présidence

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Red Trees Maurice de Vlaminck: Red Trees , oil on canvas, 650×810 mm, 1906 (Paris, Pompidou, Musée National d’Art Moderne); © 2007 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris, photo credit: CNAC/MNAM/Dist. Réunion des Musées Nationaux/Art Resource, NY

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The River Seine at Chatou Maurice de Vlaminck: The River Seine at Chatou , oil on canvas, 32 1/2 x 40 1/8 in. (82.6 x 101.9 cm), 1906 (New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection, 1998, Accession ID: 1999.363.84); © 2007 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris, photo © The Metropolitan Museum of Art http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/210010273

Article

Fauvism  

Dora Pérez-Tibi

Moreau , London, 1977 , p. 240). On his death, his pupils dispersed. In 1900–01 Derain and Vlaminck shared a studio at Chatou near Paris, where they investigated the possibilities of expressing space and states of mind by means of colour, as in Vlaminck’s the Bar Counter ( 1900; Avignon, Mus. Calvet). Matisse was introduced by Derain to Vlaminck in 1901 , thereby bringing the two Chatou artists into contact with Moreau’s former pupils. Of all these artists, Vlaminck was the most indebted to van Gogh, whose work he first encountered at an exhibition at Bernheim-Jeune

Article

Alberto Cernuschi

important exhibition Les Maîtres de l’art indépendant , held in Paris in 1937. At the Salon d’Automne Marque exhibited the Florentine-style Bust of a Small Girl (terracotta, c. 1905; Paris, Pompidou), in the same room as paintings by Matisse, Derain, Othon Friesz, Maurice de Vlaminck and others. This prompted the famous comment from the critic Louis Vauxcelles: ‘Un Donatello au milieu des fauves’, which christened Fauvism. Bibliography L. Vaillat : ‘L’Art décoratif: Albert Marque’, Art et les artistes , 15 (April–Sept 1912), pp. 274–8 A. Salmon : La Jeune

Article

emphasized the ferocity of Rouault’s work, writing: ‘…he tracks the Woman, the Woman of all ages … As soon as Rouault seizes a woman, he pickles her in vinegar, in acids’ (p. 119). In addition to works by Rouault, Coquiot also collected pictures by Chagall, Diego Rivera and Maurice de Vlaminck. Writings Cubistes, Futuristes, Passéistes: Essai sur la jeune peinture et la jeune sculpture (Paris, 1914) Paul Cézanne (Paris, 1919) Des Gloires déboulonnées (Paris, 1924) Des Peintres maudits (Paris, 1924) Maurice Utrillo (Paris, 1925) Bibliography

Article

Magda Carneci

were characterized by savage gestures and colours. A series of paintings of rape fields (e.g. Rape Field , 1943; Bucharest, Mus. A.) showed the influence of van Gogh, while Tuculescu’s series of exotic masks was more clearly derived from the work of Paul Gauguin and Maurice de Vlaminck. After 1946 Tuculescu began to explore Romanian folk art: in a rich series of strange landscapes, popular scenes and simplistic compositions, he combined realistic elements with popular, stylized, geometrical forms to produce striking depictions of an elemental nature. From 1957

Article

Malcolm Gee

from 1921 onwards. Flechtheim supported a number of German artists, including, after 1925 , George Grosz. However, his business was always based around the promotion of modern French art. Through Kahnweiler he obtained pictures by Derain, Gris, Léger, Picasso and Maurice de Vlaminck and promoted them successfully in Germany. In 1921 he founded the periodical Der Querschnitt. After the Nazi takeover of power Flechtheim emigrated to England but he continued to promote modern art, for example through the major exhibition, Masters of French 19th-century Painting

Article

Mariana Katzarova

in series, each of which has a dominant theme (e.g. Magic Figures , c. 1933; Stockholm, Nmus.; Circus Dogs , c. 1948; Geneva, Petit Pal.; Gladiator , 1955; Paris, priv. col.). Some French critics have likened his work to that of the Fauvists André Derain and Maurice de Vlaminck and have noted that he was friends with members of André Breton’s circle of Surrealists. Breton himself, however, pointed out that the Slavic spirit and the traditions of Bulgarian art were a formative influence on Papasov’s work. From 1960 he lived and worked in Vence, in southern

Article

Toru Asano

Akamatsu ( 1878–1953 ) in Osaka. From 1918 to 1923 he studied at the Tokyo School of Art. In 1924 he went to France and attended the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris. In the summer of that year he was introduced by the painter Katsuzō Satomi ( 1895–1981 ) to Maurice de Vlaminck, who strongly influenced his work. Saeki was also greatly impressed in the following year by the Parisian scenes of Maurice Utrillo. As a result the backstreets, bars and buildings of Paris became the principal motifs in his work, seen for example in a painting exhibited at the Salon

Article

expressive painting with its graphic spontaneity and free use of colour was opposed to the influence of French formal abstraction on Australian art. The roots of his art lie as much in the folk art of his Cossack heritage as in the work of such artists as Vincent van Gogh, Maurice de Vlaminck and Chaïm Soutine, whom he admired. In 1939 Vassilieff moved to semi-rural Warrandyte, near Melbourne, where he taught art at the Koornong Experimental School. His house, Stonygrad, became a meeting-place for a group of younger artists that included Albert Tucker, Sidney Nolan,

Article

Isabelle Monod-Fontaine

Guillaume Apollinaire’s L’Enchanteur pourrissant ( 1909 ), illustrated by Derain, and Max Jacob’s Saint-Matorel ( 1911 ), illustrated by Picasso. In 1912 Kahnweiler signed exclusive contracts with Braque, Picasso, and Derain, and the following year with Maurice de Vlaminck and Léger. These arrangements, purely verbal after 1920 , formed the basis of professional relationships, resting on mutual trust and commitment, that benefited artist and dealer alike. Kahnweiler systematically photographed each work as it entered his stock, a method that proved

Article

Jane Lee

generation, he was deeply moved by the exhibition of van Gogh’s work at Bernheim-Jeune, Paris. At the exhibition Derain introduced Matisse to Maurice de Vlaminck, with whom he had shared a studio in Chatou in 1900–01. During the following three years’ military service, Derain painted only on his periods of leave. He read widely, notably Friedrich Nietzsche and other modern German philosophers. His letters to Vlaminck in this period reflect his serious intentions as a painter and the beginning of the rich philosophical speculation that was to delight his friends in

Article

Jean Selz

state, the Trees at Billancourt ( c. 1898; Bordeaux, Mus. B.-A.), and in the Salon of 1905 , which marked the emergence of Fauvism, his own relation to the movement began to be defined. Although his technique and use of colour were less violent than those of such artists as Vlaminck or Derain, in 1906 he produced some of his best and most characteristic Fauve paintings, for example 14th of July at Le Havre (Bagnols-sur-Cèze, Mus. Bagnols-sur-Cèze), Posters at Trouville (Mr & Mrs J. H. Whitney priv. col., see 1975 exh. cat., p. 39) and the Beach at Fécamp

Article

Lynn Boyer Ferrillo

Marquet and Charles Camoin. The exchange of ideas proved rewarding, despite differences of opinion and temperament. It can be said that Puy was more of a Fauve by circumstance than practice. Certainly his use of colour was far less shocking than that of Matisse, Derain or Maurice de Vlaminck. His brushwork conveyed a sense of spontaneity, and recorded the shape, values and life-like qualities of the object rendered, but it was less violent and less schematic than Matisse’s. Puy’s paintings disturbed many viewers, however, and his Dawdling under the Pines (undated;

Article

James G. Todd jr

Ksthalle) or the work of Otto Dix and Max Beckmann. A related realism was also evident in the Netherlands in the work of Charley Toorop (e.g. the Friends’ Meal , 1932–3; Rotterdam, Mus. Boymans–van Beuningen), Pyke Koch and others. Even in France the rural images of Maurice de Vlaminck and Roger De la Fresnaye, and the more critical works in the 1930s of Jean Fautrier and Francis Gruber, pursue social realist objectives. With the political polarization of the period the distinction from Socialist Realism became increasingly blurred, as exemplified by the position

Article

Vanina Costa

priv. col., see L. Manguin and C. Manguin, p. 67), in its rejection of local colour, conspicuously broken brushstroke and subversion of traditional perspective, is an early example of his Fauvist style, which was considerably less revolutionary than that of Matisse or Maurice de Vlaminck. The picture is, however, given a personal twist by Manguin’s unusual framing devices and ambiguous space, for example in his use of a theoretically impossible reflection in a mirror to produce a picture within a picture. The disjunction that was noted at the time by Guillaume Apollinaire

Article

Anthony Parton

1912–14 (all in Moscow; the exhibition of 1913 was a smaller version of one that opened in St Petersburg), the Jack of Diamonds group invited a wide range of French and German artists to participate. They included not only Fauves such as Matisse, Derain, Kees van Dongen and Vlaminck but also Cubists: Robert Delaunay, Gleizes, Le Fauconnier, Léger, Braque and Picasso. Works by artists of Die Brücke and Der Blaue Reiter, such as Ernst Kirchner, Erich Heckel, Franz Macke, Franz Marc and Kandinsky, were also shown. Moreover the Jack of Diamonds almanac

Article

Malcolm Gee

one-man exhibition. Over the next ten years he built up, at relatively low cost, a large stock of paintings by Cézanne, which eventually provided him with enormous profits. Concurrently he acquired work by van Gogh, Gauguin, Bonnard, Denis, Redon, Vuillard, Derain, Rouault, Vlaminck, Rousseau, Picasso, Maillol, and Matisse, as well as by more established artists such as Degas and Renoir. Vollard kept his gallery on a modest scale. It was his practice to buy paintings outright from artists, and he often purchased the contents of their studios en bloc.

Article

Piero Pacini

example Moses Making Water Spring from the Rock (after Tintoretto) ( 1942; Florence, Col. della Ragione), the figures are intended to be energy nuclei in their own right or in virtual expansion. It is above all in his encounter with the dense colour of Georges Rouault and Maurice de Vlaminck, however, that he expanded the neo-Baroque quality of his works into new imaginary realms. Vedova participated in the activities of the Corrente group in 1942 and signed the manifesto ‘Oltre Guernica’ in May 1946 and that of the Fronte Nuovo delle Arti in October 1946; he