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Article

Gavin Stamp

(b Cobham, Kent, June 9, 1862; d Cobham, Feb 4, 1946).

English architect and writer, also active in South Africa and India . He was articled to a cousin, Arthur Baker, a former assistant of George Gilbert Scott I, in 1879 and attended classes at the Architectural Association and Royal Academy Schools before joining the office of George & Peto in London (1882), where he first met and befriended Edwin Lutyens. Baker set up in independent practice in 1890 but moved to South Africa in 1892 to join his brother Lionel Baker. In Cape Town he met Cecil Rhodes, Prime Minister of the Cape Colony, who directed his attention to the traditional European Cape Dutch architecture of the province and asked him to rebuild his house Groote Schuur (1893, 1897), now the official residence of South Africa’s prime ministers. Applying the ideas of the English Arts and Crafts movement to local conditions, Baker produced a series of houses, both in the Cape Province and the Transvaal, which were instrumental in the revival of Cape Dutch architecture. In ...

Article

Bazaar  

Mohammad Gharipour

Bazaar, which is rooted in Middle Persian wāzār and Armenian vačaṟ, has acquired three different meanings: the market as a whole, a market day, and the marketplace. The bazaar as a place is an assemblage of workshops and stores where various goods and services are offered.

Primitive forms of shops and trade centres existed in early civilizations in the Near East, such as Sialk, Tepe in Kashan, Çatal Hüyük, Jerico, and Susa. After the 4th millennium BC, the population grew and villages gradually joined together to shape new cities, resulting in trade even with the remote areas as well as the acceleration of the population in towns. The advancement of trade and accumulation of wealth necessitated the creation of trade centres. Trade, and consequently marketplaces, worked as the main driving force in connecting separate civilizations, while fostering a division of labour, the diffusion of technological innovations, methods of intercultural communication, political and economic management, and techniques of farming and industrial production....

Article

C. J. M. Walker

(Ahmed)

(b Pietersburg, Transvaal, Aug 10, 1941).

South African architect. He was the first South African of Indian origin to qualify as an architect in South Africa. He graduated from the School of Architecture, University of the Witwatersrand, in 1969. In the same year he worked his practical year with architect Glen Gallagher (b 1935) with whom he designed North Gardens, a development in Sandton, north of Johannesburg. In 1970 he established the Aziz Tayob Partnership in Page View, Johannesburg. In 1974–5 he worked in Johannesburg on several schemes, which included the Beacon Island Hotel and the Oriental Bazaar. Much of his commercial, educational and religious work was for the Muslim community and is broadly Islamic in character, using both modern and traditional features.

Tayob’s firm was also responsible for numerous private houses, 18 development master plans, 22 shopping centres as well as several mosques. His earliest shopping centres include the OK Bazaars development (...