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Leslie Bussis Tait

American art dealers of Hungarian birth, active also in France. Joseph Brummer (b Zombor, Hungary (now Sombor, Serbia), 1883; d New York, 14 April 1947) trained as a sculptor, studying under Auguste Rodin (1840–1917). In 1906 he gave up his own practice to open a gallery in Paris. His brother Ernest Brummer (b Zombor, Hungary (now Sombor, Serbia), 1891; d New York, 21 Feb 1964) trained as an archaeologist, studying at the Ecole du Louvre and the Sorbonne. Before and following service in World War I, Ernest participated in several expeditions to Egypt and the Middle East, which were occasions to collect antiquities. These became the stock (along with contemporary painting and sculpture, Japanese prints, African and Pre-Columbian art, and medieval objects) for the Brummer Gallery in Paris where Ernest assisted his brothers Joseph and Imre (d 1928). By 1917 Joseph left France to establish the New York gallery; Ernest joined him shortly before the outbreak of World War II. Their broad knowledge and discernment in many fields led to the Brummers’ prominent reputation as leading art dealers....

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G. Gaeta Bertelà

(b Lyon, April 22, 1827; d Florence, Sept 21, 1888).

French collector. His father Jean-Baptiste Carrand (1792–1871) was a collector of medieval and Renaissance decorative objects (Byzantine and Gothic ivories, Renaissance maiolica, enamelwork, arms, bronzes and coins) and a connoisseur of manuscripts and documents, first in Lyon and then in Paris, where Louis worked in partnership with him. Their most prestigious purchases were some early medieval and Gothic ivory pieces and the famous flabellum (9th century, court of Charles the Bald) from the Benedictine abbey of Tournus in Burgundy. In 1867 they exhibited ivories, bronzes, arms, wood-carvings and secular gold items in the Exposition Universelle, Paris. After his father’s death Louis continued to enlarge the collection. In particular he added early medieval and Renaissance textiles. In 1880 he moved to Nice and in 1881 to Pisa, where he remained until 1886, continuing to buy artefacts not only from French and Italian sales but also from England, Germany, Greece and Turkey. In ...

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(b Bar-sur-Aube, Aube, Aug 31, 1779; d Saint-Cloud, Hauts-de-Seine, Aug 19, 1842).

French civil servant, collector and art historian. Descended from a rich family of financial administrators under the Bourbon monarchy, he served in the Revolutionary army after 1789 and then entered the civil service. In 1807 he became a Councillor of the Revenue Court, and he retained this post until he died after returning from a journey to Italy.

Du Sommerard started his career as a collector by acquiring the works of contemporary French masters. In 1825–6, however, he sold these to devote himself entirely to French art from the Middle Ages to the 17th century. His new collection was moved in 1832 to one of the last 15th-century Parisian palaces, the Hôtel des Abbés de Cluny, near the Roman baths of ancient Lutetia. This private museum was managed with purely historical and artistic aims: Du Sommerard intended to reveal the gaps inevitable in any history of France based entirely on written documents, and to make people aware of the progress of history through the history of art....

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