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Gordon Campbell

German faience factory founded in Saxony in 1770 by Johann Samuel Friedrich Tännich. The factory initially produced tableware in a Rococo style and later made creamware based on Wedgwood wares, which are sometimes marked as Wedgwood. The factory closed in 1848.

Article

Gordon Campbell

French pottery near Bourg-en-Bresse (Ain), founded in 1760 by Baron Marron de Meillonnas at his château. The factory produced earthenware in the Rococo style. Its painters included Protais Pidoux (e.g. asparagus dish, Barnard Castle, Bowes Mus.), who worked at Meillonnas from 1763 to 1766. Baron Marron was guillotined in 1794...

Article

Reviser Margaret Barlow

A renewed interest among artists, writers, and collectors between c. 1820 and 1870 in Europe, predominantly in France, in the Rococo style in painting, the decorative arts, architecture, and sculpture. The revival of the Rococo served diverse social needs. As capitalism and middle-class democracy triumphed decisively in politics and the economy, the affluent and well-born put increasing value on the aristocratic culture of the previous century: its arts, manners and costumes, and luxury goods.

Among the earliest artists in the 19th century to appreciate and emulate 18th-century art were Jules-Robert Auguste (1789–1830), R. P. Bonington, Eugène Delacroix, and Paul Huet. For these young artists the Rococo was a celebration of sensual and sexual pleasure and a product of a free and poetic imagination. Looking particularly at the work of Watteau, they sought to reproduce the Rococo capacity for lyrical grace, its sophisticated understanding of colour, and its open, vibrant paint surfaces in their work. These qualities can be seen in such re-creations of 18th-century scenes as Eugène Lami’s ...