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Article

Atsushi Tanaka

(b Osaka, Oct 13, 1887; d Ashiya, Hyōgo Prefect., Feb 13, 1931).

Japanese painter and illustrator. He distinguished himself in painting at middle-school. In 1907 he entered the department of Nihonga (Japanese-style) painting at the Tokyo School of Fine Art and later transferred to the department of Yōga (Western-style) painting. After graduating in 1914 he returned to Osaka and continued to paint. In 1919 he entered his first exhibited work in the 6th Nikakai (Second Division Society) show. The painting, the N Family, received the Chogyū Prize. In the Nikakai exhibition of 1920 his portrait of the Young Girl Omme received the Nika Prize.

In 1921–2 Koide made his first trip to the West, travelling to Paris and Berlin and throughout southern France. This led to him abandoning his early style, which had been characterized by rigid compositions and dark tonalities, in favour of a more even, stronger brush style with a lighter palette; his works became lighter in spirit. In 1923...

Article

Nelly Perazzo

(b Buenos Aires, Oct 1, 1927).

Argentine painter, graphic designer, teacher and critic. After studying in Japan from 1935 to 1951 he returned to Argentina, remaining there until his move to New York in 1963. His paintings from 1952 were in the style of Art informel, with a calligraphic emphasis demonstrating his sympathy with oriental art, but around 1960 he moved towards a more gestural abstraction in works such as Painting No. 20 (1961; Buenos Aires, Mus. A. Mod.), using thicker paint and more subdued colours.

In 1964 Sakai began to use more geometric shapes in his pictures, and he continued to do so on moving in 1965 to Mexico, where he remained until 1977. His example opened the way to geometric abstraction in Mexico, where there was no real tradition of such work. In 1976, shortly before returning to New York, he began a series of paintings using the formal repetition of parallel undulating lines of strongly contrasting colour. From ...

Article

James Cahill

revised by Vyvyan Brunst

[Ch’eng Shih-fa; Cheng Tong; Ch’eng T’ung]

(b Songjiang County, Shanghai Municipality, 1921; d Shanghai, Jul 17, 2007).

Chinese painter and illustrator. By his own account Cheng was determined from an early age to become a painter. Although his father died when Cheng was nine, support from relatives enabled him to enter the Shanghai Academy of Fine Arts in 1938, where he was trained in the traditional disciplines of landscape and bird-and-flower painting. He also took an interest in the work of modern Chinese masters. Following graduation, he worked briefly in a bank before joining the Shanghai Art Publishing Agency in 1952 as an illustrator. His assignments included New Year paintings and drawings for editions of short stories. Among his first successes was a series of plates for a contemporary edition of the 18th-century satirical classic Rulin waishi (“The scholars”) by Wu Jingzi, which in 1959 won a medal at the Leipzig International Book Exhibition (Eng. trans., Yang Hsien-yi and G. Yang, The Scholars, Beijing, 1957). However, his most impressive early achievement was a set of illustrations for another classic, Lu Xun’s ...

Article

Akira Tatehata

(b Kōbe, March 13, 1919; d Paris, May 14, 1996).

Japanese painter. He entered Osaka Art School in 1933 but left it in mid-course. From 1937 to 1945 he worked at the publicity department of a railway company in Osaka as a graphic designer. After World War II he decided to become a painter. He went to Paris in 1952, where he studied at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière, and in the following year exhibited at the Salon d’Octobre. His abstract works of the early 1950s have a static, poetic picture surface with delicate texture. However, from 1957 a dramatic, bold element began to appear (e.g. Festival, 1960; Fukuoka, A. Mus.), involving simplified forms reminiscent of calligraphy. From then, he exhibited regularly at such exhibitions as the Salon des Réalités Nouvelles and the Salon de Mai. In the mid-1960s his style underwent a drastic change. Sugai produced compositions with dynamic movement, flat colour fields eliminating traces of brushstrokes, and sign-like forms with a clear outline. Such works as ...

Article

Reiko Tomii

[ Tenmyōya ]

(b Musashino, Feb 10, 1966).

Japanese painter and graphic artist . Mostly self-taught, from childhood he loved to draw and he joined a high-school painting club. In 1983 the American film Wild Style (1982) inspired him to study hip-hop culture and become a graffiti artist. While working as a graphic designer of CD jackets at a record company, Tenmyouya submitted his art works to major competitive exhibitions for graphic artists such as Urbanart and JACA (Japan Association of Art and Culture’s visual art competition) and was often successful. His trapezoidal Manga Ukiyo-e series received a special award in JACA ’97 by reinterpreting the popular media of manga and ukiyo-e, as well as the life of modern yakuza outlaws, a popular TV and film subject. In 2000 Tenmyouya left his design job and had his first solo exhibition at a rental gallery, Harajuku, in Tokyo. He also found an outlet for his graphically oriented works in the print media, starting his monthly contribution of the ...