1-7 of 7 results  for:

  • East Asian Art x
  • Artist, Architect, or Designer x
  • Textiles and Embroidery x
Clear all

Article

Joan Kee

[Kim Sooja; Kim Soo-ja; Kim Soo Ja]

(b Daegu, April 24, 1957).

Korean mixed-media artist, active also in the USA. Kim studied painting at Hongik University, Seoul, graduating in 1984. That same year she received a scholarship to study art at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris. During the mid-1980s Kim became interested in employing commonly used Korean textiles in her work. Distinctively patterned and coloured, the textiles offered different formal possibilities, and early works featured various swathes cut and sewn together to form large, continuous surfaces. In 1992 Kim was awarded a residency as part of the International Studio Program at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center in New York. Inspired by the objects collected in her studio, Kim began to use the figure of the bottari, wrapped bundles used in Korea for the easy transport of goods, in installations such as Deductive Object (1994). She also began to experiment with performance and interactive works. In Sewing Into Walking...

Article

Mai Vu

(b Hiroshima, April 22, 1938).

Japanese fashion designer, active in Tokyo and Paris (see fig.). For his Autumn/Winter 1998 collection, Issey Miyake sent all his models down the Paris catwalk in a single stream of red, knitted tubing. Unlike the typical fashion show where the season’s look is unveiled in its finalized form, Miyake’s show was a presentation of his process. In collaboration with designer Dai Fujiwara, Miyake developed a radical approach to fashion design. Utilizing technological advances in fibre, fabric and computer science, he created a system to manufacture individual garments from a single thread. The method, known as A-POC, an acronym for ‘A Piece of Cloth’, is Miyake’s solution to the complicated manufacturing methods of traditional cut-and-sew garments.

Miyake was born in Hiroshima 1938 and witnessed the destruction and devastation of his country during World War II, but also saw its rise and redemption in the following years. This strength imbued in him allowed his artistry and discipline to grow. In ...

Article

Arlette P. Kouwenhoven

(b Tokyo, October 31, 1898; d May 29, 1992).

Japanese printmaker and textile dyer. He graduated from the Kawabata School of Fine Arts in 1923 and later studied under Muneyoshi Yanagi and the textile dyer Keisuke Serizawa. After working on dyed textiles for 30 years, Yoshitoshi gradually shifted to the creation of stencil prints in the late 1950s. He developed a new and distinctive style that combined stencil printing (kappazuri), traditionally applied to textiles, and stencil dyeing (katazome). He entered one of his first prints, Kure no ichi (‘Year End Market’; 1957) in the 1st International Biennale of Prints in Tokyo (1957). The final choice between Yōzō Hamaguchi and Yoshitoshi aroused a famous debate about Japanese versus Western values. Yoshitoshi’s prints show a strong interest in kabuki theatre, which was probably due to his having been brought up by his aunt Kin Harada, who was a teacher of kabuki chanting. He also favoured folklore, village life and historical subjects, such as the Kamakura-period (...

Article

Mitsuhiko Hasebe

(b Shizuoka, May 13, 1895; d Tokyo, April 5, 1984).

Japanese textile designer. In 1916 he graduated from the design division of the Tokyo Technical College. Inspired by the bingata (multicoloured, stencil-dyed) textiles of Okinawa (see Textile, §III, 1, (ii), (d)), from 1928 he began to research them and, subsequently, the traditional textiles of other regions. His individualistic style of katazome (stencil dyeing) was the result of his involvement in the entire process, from design, stencil cutting and application to dyeing. He was deeply impressed by the writings on crafts by Muneyoshi Yanagi and contributed works to the Mingei (‘folk art’) movement. In 1931 he executed a stencil-dyed cloth design for the bound cover of the first issue of the movement’s monthly publication Kōgei (‘Crafts’, 1931–51), of which he was editor for a year.

Using such elements as natural scenes, motifs from everyday life and Japanese characters as his subjects, Serizawa established a novel, poetic world of textiles that combined an excellent sense of colour and design. In ...

Article

Hiroshi Kashiwagi

(b Nara, Jan 13, 1930; d Jan 10, 2002).

Japanese graphic designer. He graduated from the Kyoto City College of Fine Art in 1950. He was employed as a textile designer with the Kanegafuchi Spinning Co., Kyoto (1950–52), and then worked for the Sankei Shinbun Press, Tokyo, as a graphic designer (1952–7). In 1960 he co-founded the Nippon Design Centre in Tokyo with Yusaku Kamekura, and from 1961 to 1965 he lectured at the Kuwazawa Institute of Design, Tokyo. In 1963 he established his own studio—the Tanaka Design Atelier—in Tokyo, changing the name to Ikko Tanaka Design Studio in 1976. He rose to prominence in the graphics industry in Japan with designs that synthesized Japanese pictorial traditions with popular Western styles of typography and layout. His work typified the energy of Japanese graphics communications. He designed posters, corporate logos, book and magazine layouts and exhibition displays, for example the Japanese Government’s History Pavilion displays at Expo ’70, Osaka, and the ...

Article

Britta Erickson

(b Taiyuan, Shanxi Province, Nov 27, 1961).

Chinese installation artist. Lin studied art at Capital Normal University, Beijing in 1984. In 1987 she and her husband, the video artist Wang Gongxin (b 1960), moved to New York where, in 1989, she took courses at the Art Students League. In 1995 they returned to Beijing, where the dearth of venues receptive to mixed-media installation art led the couple to stage exhibitions in their home. Lin became one of the most notable Chinese artists creating mixed-media installation art, then a fledgling format in China. In 2001 Lin and Wang established China’s first public venue dedicated to new media art, Loft New Media Art Center, in Beijing.

1995 marked a breakthrough for Lin when she began working with white cotton thread. Her first major work in this signature material, The Proliferation of Thread-Winding (1995; for illustration see 1998 exh. cat.) was exhibited in her home. Lin’s best-known early work, ...

Article

Pamela Roskin

(b Yokohama, Oct 3, 1943).

Japanese fashion designer ( see fig. ). Yamamoto’s influential designs combined traditional Japanese silhouettes with notions of architectural forms and impeccable tailoring. The collections from the designer’s early years were often in dark, muted colours and featured unstructured oversized layers that evoked the uncut philosophy of the Japanese kimono. Later in his career, he incorporated splashes of bright colour into his pieces.

Yamamoto’s father, a soldier, died in World War II. His mother was a seamstress. Yamamoto received a degree in law in 1966 before graduating in 1969 from the Bunkafukuso Gakuin, a prestigious Tokyo fashion school. That same year he won two fashion design awards, the So-en and Endo. He then lived in Paris for two years where he became familiar with European ideals in fashion. The juxtaposition of high style amidst the French student riots, anti-war protests and the women’s rights movement had a profound effect on his work. In an interview with ...