You are looking at  1-20 of 36 results  for:

  • Eighteenth-Century Art x
  • Prints and Printmaking x
Clear All

Article

Mark Jones

(b Bordeaux, Nov 4, 1761; d Paris, Dec 10, 1822).

French medallist, engraver and illustrator. He was first apprenticed to the medallist André Lavau (d 1808) and then attended the Académie de Peinture et de Sculpture in Bordeaux. In 1786 he travelled to Paris and entered the workshop of Nicolas-Marie Gatteaux. His first great success was a large, realistic and highly detailed medal representing the Fall of the Bastille (1789); because it would have been difficult and risky to strike, he produced it in the form of single-sided lead impressions or clichés, coloured to resemble bronze. The following year he used this novel technique again, to produce an equally successful companion piece illustrating the Arrival of Louis XVI in Paris. Andrieu lay low during the latter part of the French Revolution, engraving vignettes and illustrating an edition of Virgil by Firmin Didot (1764–1836). He reappeared in 1800, with medals of the Passage of the Great St Bernard...

Article

Bernt von Hagen

In 

Article

Fabian Stein

[Bühler]

German family of goldsmiths, furniture-makers and engravers. Lorenz Biller (i) (fl c. 1664–85) achieved prominence with works for Emperor Leopold I, for whom he made a centrepiece with a knight on a horse (1680–84; Moscow, Kremlin, Armoury) that was sent to Moscow as an ambassadorial gift. Lorenz Biller (i)’s sons, Johann Ludwig Biller (i) (1656–1732), Albrecht Biller (1663–1720) and Lorenz Biller (ii) (fl c. 1678–1726), supplied silverware of the highest quality to several German courts, especially that of Prussia, for which Albrecht made large wine-coolers and ‘pilgrim’ bottles (1698; Berlin, Schloss Köpenick). The strongly sculptural style of these pieces suggests familiarity with the work of Andreas Schlüter. Albrecht Biller’s abilities as a sculptor are also evident in his reliefs and in seven splendid silver vases he supplied to the court of Hesse-Kassel (c. 1700; Kassel, Hess. Landesmus.). The silver vases ordered by the court usually followed French fashions, yet the form and lavish decoration of these pieces are quite different. A pair of vases by ...

Article

Hannelore Hägele

(b Geisslingen, Feb 7, 1742; d Durlach, 1811).

German medallist and engraver. In 1768 he began his career in Augsburg, where he exhibited medals of the municipal curators Langenmantel and Amman and of Paul von Stetten. He later went to Karlsruhe, where he became court medallist and die-engraver; he also worked in Durlach. Stylistically, his medals, often initialled j.m.b., closely resemble those of Franz Andreas Schega and Johann Karl Hedlinger. Portrait medals of Charles V, Duke of Württemberg and Charles Frederick, Margrave of Baden were Bückle’s best works. He also executed the commemorative medal of Count Demetrius Galitzin (1793) and a silver medal (1773; Domanig, no. 771) depicting a hunting scene, awarded as a prize by the School of Forestry and Hunting Science. His pupil J. H. Boltschhauser became a medal engraver to the Mannheim court.

H. Bolzenthal: Skizzen zur Kunstgeschichte der modernen Medaillen-Arbeit (1429–1840) (Berlin, 1840) K. Domanig: Die deutsche Medaille in kunst- und kulturhistorischer Hinsicht...

Article

Jorge Luján-Muñoz

(b Guatemala City, Sept 16, 1781; d Guatemala City, Nov 21, 1845).

Guatemalan painter, printmaker, and medallist. He entered the mint in 1795 as an apprentice engraver but on the recommendation of its director, Pedro Garci-Aguirre, also became Master Corrector at the Escuela de Dibujo de la Sociedad Económica de Amigos del País, Guatemala City, in 1796, holding the post until 1804. He continued working at the mint until 1809 and demonstrated outstanding skill both as a medallist and engraver of coins and as an engraver and etcher. He returned to the mint in 1823 as second engraver, remaining in the post until his death.

Despite the quality of his work as a printmaker and medallist, Cabrera gained artistic recognition especially as a miniature painter, working mostly in watercolour on ivory in a meticulous technique. He produced some miniatures on religious themes and others of birds, but the majority, measuring no more than 50 mm in height or width, were portraits of members of the Guatemalan aristocracy and bourgeoisie. It is not known exactly how many he produced, but from the middle of the 1830s he began to number them, starting from 500; the highest known number of the approximately 200 authenticated miniatures is 745. Although he suffered some illness, he was most productive during the last five years of his life. An evolution can be discerned from his earliest works, dating from ...

Article

Gerald W. R. Ward

(b Boston, MA, Jan 5, 1656; d Boston, Aug 20, 1722).

American silversmith, goldsmith and engraver. The son of a cooper, Coney probably served his apprenticeship with Jeremiah Dummer (1645–1718) of Boston. Coney may have engraved the plates for the first banknotes printed in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1690 and certainly engraved the plates for those issued in 1702. His patrons included important citizens of Boston, churches throughout New England, local societies and Harvard College. Active as a silversmith and goldsmith for 45 years, he produced objects in three distinct styles—that of the late 17th century (characterized by engraved and flat-chased ornament and scrollwork), the early Baroque and the late Baroque (or Queen Anne)—and introduced specialized forms to New England, for example the monteith and chocolatepot. Although derived directly from the English silversmithing tradition and thus not innovative in design, Coney’s work exhibits excellent craftsmanship in all technical aspects of gold- and silversmithing. Two lobed sugar-boxes (Boston, MA, Mus. F. A., and Manchester, NH, Currier Gal. A.), a large, gadrooned, two-handled cup (...

Article

Madeleine Barbin

(b Liège, Jan 19, 1722; d Paris, July 31, 1776).

French engraver and print publisher. He was descended from a family of gunsmiths. In 1739 he went to Paris to join a brother who had established himself there as a goldsmith. Beginning as an engraver and chaser, in 1746 he obtained the rank of master. As early as 1757 he began to specialize in crayon manner (see Crayon manner §2) using a roulette, a process that brought him success; Jean-Charles François contributed in developing this process, but Demarteau, because of his superior skill, outstripped his rival. At a time when drawing was greatly in vogue, he offered the public faithful reproductions, first of red chalk drawings and then of drawings intended for decoration or teaching, in two or three colours, by contemporary artists. His oeuvre comprises 560 numbered plates, half of them after specially provided drawings by François Boucher (for illustration see Crayon manner) or after drawings owned by collectors such as ...

Article

David M. Sokol

(b Cheshire, CT, 1754; d New Haven, CT, Jan 31, 1832).

American engraver. Doolittle learnt to engrave in metal through his apprenticeship to a silversmith. His career as an independent craftsman was interrupted by army service during the American Revolution, during which time he met Ralph Earl, whose drawings of battle scenes, including the battles of Lexington and Concord, Doolittle was later to engrave on copper. The success of these historical scenes, for example A View of the Town of Concord, published in New Haven in 1775, enabled Doolittle to abandon his trade as a silversmith. Responding to patriotic demand for images of the new American leaders, Doolittle engraved likenesses of successive American presidents, including George Washington, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson. The tribute to Washington he first issued in 1788, A Display of the United States of America (1794; New Haven, CT, Yale U. A.G.), was reworked five times. He also engraved book illustrations, scenic views, and bookplates. Although not the first engraver in America, as he was later to claim, Doolittle was the only one of his generation to attempt to expand beyond service work to original compositions on a regular basis....

Article

Christian Michel

(b Paris, Sept 13, 1719; d Paris, Dec 11, 1794).

French engraver. On his mother’s side he was the grandson of a goldsmith, which may have encouraged him to take up engraving. In 1736 he was a pupil of Georg Friedrich Schmidt (1712–75), and later he joined the workshop of Jacques-Philippe Lebas. About 1740 he engraved 34 mediocre portraits for a collection of portraits of famous people (Pognon and Bruand, nos 2–28, 30–36) being put together by the print publisher Odieuvre. He very soon came to specialize in small-scale portrait engravings after other artists’ works: paintings, drawings or even other engravings. The hallmarks of his work were the great precision and attention to detail that he gave to his small plates, and his ability to reproduce, by means of multiple and dense incisions, the nuances of large-scale portrait engravings.

In the 1750s Ficquet was given the opportunity of consolidating his technique in the course of engraving, after drawings by ...

Article

Christiaan Schuckman

[Isidor Coridon Fidelle]

(b Dokkum, Aug 18, 1692; d Amsterdam, bur Feb 3, 1767).

Dutch printmaker and draughtsman. He was trained from an early age by his father Johannes Folkema, a goldsmith, and by Bernard Picart in Amsterdam. His earliest work is the engraving of the Virgin and Child (1707). He made mostly drawings and etchings but also one or two mezzotint portraits. He sometimes used the engraver’s burin to work over areas in shadow. The majority of his 300 or so prints are portraits, topographical views, frontispieces, book illustrations or vignettes. He etched a number of miniature portraits painted by his sister Anna Folkema (1695–1768), who was also an engraver, and contributed prints to the Dresden Gallery, a collection of reproductive engravings after masterpieces from the picture collection in Dresden. Although he worked mostly after other artists’ drawings and paintings, prints such as the illustrations to Cervantes (Amsterdam, 1731) are based on his own designs.

Scheen, p. 152...

Article

Irene Haberland

In 

Article

Irene Haberland

In 

Article

Kelly Donahue-Wallace

[Gil y Pérez, Gerónimo Antonio]

(b Zamora, Spain, Nov 3, 1731; d Mexico City, April 18, 1798).

Spanish printmaker, medallist, and type designer, active in Spain and Mexico. He was one of the first students at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de S Fernando in Madrid (founded 1752), which awarded him a pension to train as a medallist from 1754 to 1758 under Spain’s Engraver General, Tomás Francisco Prieto (1726–82). In 1760 the academy named Gil Académico de Mérito for his medal-engraving skills.

Upon completing his studies, Gil briefly served as drawing instructor at the S Fernando academy but worked principally making copperplate engravings, letter press type, and medals. He was a frequent contributor to luxury books sponsored by the Real Academia de Historia and the S Fernando academy, including the so-called prince’s edition of Don Quixote (1780) and Antigüedades árabes de España (1787). He spent more than 15 years designing type for the Real Biblioteca, and was credited by his peers with rescuing the Spanish type-making industry. The finest works he carried out in Spain included the engraved illustrations for ...

Article

German family of artists. Johann Lorenz Haid (b Augsburg, 1702; d Augsburg, 1750) and Johann Gottfried Haid (b Augsburg, 7 May 1714; d Vienna, 5 Sept 1776) were the sons of the Augsburg goldsmith Johann Valentin Haid (1668–1737). Johann Lorenz, a pupil of Georg Philipp Rugendas I, produced primarily engraved portraits, including 22 fantasy heads after Giovanni Battista Piazzetta, of which few have survived. Johann Gottfried studied initially with his brother, then from c. 1750 with the Viennese court painter Martin van Mytens II. During a stay in London in the first half of the 1760s he worked as a mezzotint-engraver for John Boydell, producing mezzotints after oil paintings by Rembrandt, Reynolds and Nathaniel Dance, included in the Catalogue of Plates of John and Josiah Boydell (London, 1803). He founded a school of mezzotint-engraving in Vienna in 1766, which continued after his death as a specialist school within the Kaiserliche Akademie der Bildenden Künste. He also designed numerous ornamental engravings and made reproductive prints after ...

Article

Franco Panvini Rosati

Italian family of engravers and medallists, of Bavarian origin. They worked mainly in the Roman mint from the mid-17th century to the end of the 18th. The medals they made are notable above all for their documentary value relating to the history of Rome and the city’s monuments. They were technically skilled but somewhat unimaginative portrait artists. Johan Andreas Hamerani (b Adensburg, c. 1600; d Livorno, 1644) arrived in Rome in 1615 during the pontificate of Pope Paul V. Although he worked in the papal mint, he did not execute annual medals. His son Alberto Hamerani (b Rome, 10 Oct 1620; d Rome, 21 June 1677) worked for a short time at the mint of Massa Carrara, then, between 1657 and 1669, in Rome, as assistant first to Gaspare Morone Mola and later to Girolamo Lucenti. From 1667 he engraved papal seals. Noteworthy among his medals was one commemorating the entry into Rome of Queen Christina of Sweden (...

Article

M. J. C. Otten

(bapt Amsterdam, Sept 10, 1645; bur Haarlem, June 15, 1708).

Dutch etcher, draughtsman, painter, sculptor, medallist and writer. He is best known for his political caricatures of Louis XIV of France and for his prints glorifying William III, Stadholder of the Netherlands and King of England. De Hooghe is an important representative of the late Dutch Baroque. His style is characterized by strong contrasts of lights and darks and an expressive composition. In his prints he combined contemporary personalities with allegorical figures. His prints are numerous, but few of his drawings survive and his paintings are rarer still. De Hooghe’s first commission for an etching probably came from Constantijn Huygens the elder, secretary to William III; this was Zeestraet (1667; Hollstein, no. 287). In 1668 de Hooghe was in Paris, where he produced some book illustrations, but he returned to Amsterdam, where from 1670 to 1691 he illustrated the annual newsheet Hollandsche Mercurius. He regularly produced such political prints as ...

Article

Bernt von Hagen and Irene Haberland

German family of engravers. They were central figures in Augsburg’s role as a centre for engraving during the 17th and early 18th centuries. Bartholomäus Kilian I (1548–88), a goldsmith from Silesia, settled c. 1575 in Augsburg, where he became a master in 1578. His sons (1) Lucas Kilian and (2) Wolfgang Kilian were trained in engraving by Dominicus Custos (b after 1550; d 1612), who married Bartholomäus’s widow. Lucas was a masterly and innovative engraver, introducing Italian influences to German ornamentation; he and Wolfgang developed the new form of the Thesenblatt, or thesis broadsheet. Wolfgang had three sons: Johann Baptist Kilian (1623–97), a goldsmith, and (3) Philipp Kilian and (4) Bartholomäus Kilian II, both notable engravers of portraits and book illustrations. Philipp had two sons, Wolfgang Philipp Kilian (1654–1732) and Jeremias Kilian (1665–1730), both engravers. Wolfgang Philipp had five sons, three of whom, ...

Article

Maxime Préaud

French family of artists. Laurent Leclerc (1590-1695) was a goldsmith from Metz. The most prominent members of the Leclerc family were his son (1) Sébastien Leclerc (i) and Sébastien’s son (2) Sébastien Leclerc (ii). Another son of Sébastien Leclerc (i), Louis-Auguste Leclerc (b Paris, 30 Nov 1699; d Copenhagen, 8 March 1771), was a sculptor and pupil of Antoine Coyzevox; from 1735 he worked in Denmark, becoming professor at the Kongelige Akademi for de Skønne Kunster in Copenhagen. His son and pupil Jacques-Sébastien Leclerc (b Paris, c. 1734; d Paris, 17 May 1785) became a painter, producing small-scale amorous scenes; from 1778 he taught at the Académie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture in Paris.

(b Metz, bapt Sept 26, 1637; d Paris, Oct 25, 1714).

Printmaker, draughtsman and military engineer. He probably learnt the rudiments of drawing and engraving from his ...

Article

Anne Leclair

(b Paris, 1701; d Paris, 1779).

French collector, goldsmith, draughtsman and engraver. He was a member of a Parisian family of goldsmiths. In 1756 he became an alderman of the city of Paris, an appointment that conferred nobility. He was a great connoisseur who numbered among his friends artists, art dealers and art lovers, including Edmé-François Gersaint, Jean-Georges Wille and Pierre-Jean Mariette, with whom he collaborated in publishing a work on Edme Bouchardon’s equestrian statue of Louis XV (Paris, Place Louis XV; destr.). On Mariette’s death, the King urged Lempereur to purchase for him the whole of his famous collection (see Mariette family, §4); the negotiations broke down, but Lempereur did succeed in buying 1300 drawings (Paris, Louvre).

Lempereur himself also gathered together a superb collection of works of art (1218 items, sold 24 May 1773). The greater part of the drawings from Italy and the Netherlands (such as those by Raphael and ...

Article

Bernt von Hagen

In