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Article

L. Fornari Schianchi

(b Arcisate di Como, 1727; d Parma, Nov 4, 1792).

Italian stuccoist, printmaker, painter and collector. Before studying anything else he learned stucco decoration from his father Pietro Luigi (d 1754), who worked in Germany from 1743 until his death. Stucco work always remained Bossi’s main activity, alongside that of printmaking, especially etching. His experiments in the latter field followed in the tradition of the great Venetian printmakers. He was encouraged by Charles-François Hutin, who was in Dresden from 1753 to 1757 and whom he followed to Milan and Parma. His first etching, based on a work by Bartolomeo Nazari (1693–1758), was done in Milan in 1758. From 1759 on he was in Parma, where he produced some plates for the Iconologie tirée de divers auteurs (1759) by Jean-Baptiste Boudard, and where he executed the stucco trophy decoration for the attic of S Pietro, the construction of which began in 1761. From this date Bossi also collaborated with the designer ...

Article

Andrew W. Moore

(b Norwich, Dec 22, 1768; d Norwich, April 22, 1821).

English painter, printmaker, collector and teacher. The son of a journeyman weaver, he was apprenticed to a coach and sign painter, Francis Whisler, from 1783 to 1790. He presumably continued in this trade and during the 1790s consolidated his artistic training. Early local influences upon Crome included William Beechey and John Opie, but the friendship of Thomas Harvey, a patron, collector and amateur artist, was the most significant. Harvey’s collection included works by Dutch 17th-century masters such as Aelbert Cuyp, Jacob van Ruisdael and Meindert Hobbema, and also works by Gainsborough and Richard Wilson. The earliest record of Wilson’s influence is provided by two oils entitled Composition in the Style of Wilson (untraced), dated 1796 and 1798 in Crome’s Memorial Exhibition of 1821. The Dutch influence was also strong throughout Crome’s career. Crome’s early acquaintance with Harvey and his collection almost certainly encouraged him to become a collector, and the Yarmouth banker ...

Article

Laure Pellicer

(b Montpellier, April 1, 1766; d Montpellier, March 16, 1837).

French painter, printmaker and collector. He was taught by the painter Jean Coustou (1719–91) in Montpellier before entering, in 1783, the studio of David, to whose artistic principles he remained faithful all his life. His career as a history painter began brilliantly when, in 1787, he won the Prix de Rome for Nebuchadnezzar Ordering the Execution of Zedekiah’s Children (Paris, Ecole N. Sup. B.-A.). This early success was consolidated by the four years he spent at the Académie de France in Rome and by the enthusiastic reception of his Death of Abel (1790; Montpellier, Mus. Fabre) at the Salon of 1791.

In 1793 his royalist sympathies forced him to move to Florence, where the poet Vittorio Alfieri and his mistress the Countess of Albany, estranged wife of the Young Pretender, introduced him to the artistic and social life of the city. In the years preceding the French invasion of Tuscany in ...

Article

Richard Jeffree

(b Nièvre, 1686; d London, before April 3, 1770).

English painter, printmaker, collector and curator of French birth. A nephew of the French-born portrait painter Louis Goupy (c. 1674–1747), he visited Malta early in his career, producing four panoramic views of the port of Valletta (Melbourne Hall, Derbys), later engraved by Antoine Benoist. In 1711 he was among the first subscribers to Godfrey Kneller’s Academy in London. Goupy’s speciality from then on appears to have been the production of small copies in pastel or gouache of Old Master paintings; they were widely admired and initially fetched high prices. Through his acquaintance with Marco Ricci, Goupy painted sets for productions by the Royal Academy of Music during the 1720s. These included several operas by George Frideric Handel, with whom he developed a close friendship; it ended with the publication of the True Representation and Character of the Charming Brute (1730), the print made after Goupy’s savage caricature (gouache; Cambridge, Fitzwilliam) of the composer as a bewigged hog playing the organ....

Article

P. Knolle

(b Utrecht, Sept 25, 1731; d Utrecht, May 26, 1797).

Dutch timber merchant, draughtsman, engraver and collector. He made drawings, engravings and watercolours of townscapes, landscapes and buildings. His elder brother Pieter Jan van Liender (1727–79) was also a draughtsman, and he was first taught by his uncle Jacobus (1696–1759). In Amsterdam, where Paulus went to learn the commercial trade, he studied under Cornelis Pronk. There he became friends with a fellow student, Jan de Beyer, with whom he went on a study trip to Germany. Their work was stylistically very similar, and together they created a series of topographical prints, which were included in Het verheerlykt Nederland of kabinet van hedendaagsche gezigten (‘The glorious Netherlands or cabinet of modern views’; Amsterdam, 1745–7). Van Liender also became known for his contributions to other topographical atlases, such as that of the city of Amersfoort (1760). About 1760 he settled in Haarlem and became a timber merchant, and from ...

Article

Louise Lippincott

(b London, bapt Aug 2, 1701; d London, bur Sanderstead, Sept 15, 1758).

English painter, engraver, print-seller, dealer and collector. The eldest son of a London surgeon, Pond studied with the portrait painter John Vanderbank before entering the St Martin’s Lane Academy, London, in 1720. However, he was most influenced by the Roman Club, a group of young artists and writers under the aegis of Jonathan Richardson the elder. Pond visited Italy in 1725–7 with the painter George Knapton, the painter and poet John Dyer (1700–58) and the antiquary Daniel Wray, all fellow members. In Rome he frequented antiquarian circles around Baron Philipp von Stosch and Pier Leone Ghezzi but learnt little about painting. He returned to England via Paris, meeting the connoisseur and print-seller Pierre-Jean Mariette and initiating a lifelong correspondence.

Once back in London, Pond endured years of obscurity before re-emerging in the late 1730s as a fashionable portrait painter, print-seller and connoisseur. His pastel portraits in the manner of Rosalba Carriera, for example ...

Article

Richard C. Mühlberger

(b Dordrecht, March 4, 1710; d The Hague, May 7, 1792).

Dutch painter, glass engraver, printmaker, collector and dealer. He studied with the Dordrecht artist Adriaen van der Burg (1693–1733) from c. 1725 until van der Burg’s death. On 16 October 1733 he began entries in the first of two professional diaries (Dordrecht, Mus. van Gijn) that record in unusual detail the activities of his career until 16 November 1753. In 1733 he took on his first pupil. He taught regularly for the rest of his life: among his pupils were Jan van Os, Joris Ponse (1723–83), Wouter Dam (c. 1726–c. 1785), Gerrit Malleyn (1753–1816), Nicolaas Muys (1740–1808), Jacobus Perkois (1756–1804) and his own great-nephew, the marine painter Martinus Schouman (1770–1848).

In 1736 Schouman became one of the founder-members of the Dordrecht Brotherhood of St Luke, a private society formed for the discussion of art. He gave an exhibition there and was official engraver to the Brotherhood. He also belonged to drinking and debating clubs, and through them and the Brotherhood he met many of the prominent citizens of Dordrecht. In ...