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Claudia Lazzaro

Italian estate near Viterbo, c. 65 km north-east of Rome. It was built for Cardinal Gianfrancesco Gambara, Bishop of Viterbo, from c. 1568, and the design of the whole estate, comprising small twin palaces (palazzine, called casinos in the 17th century), a formal garden and a park, is attributed to Jacopo Vignola. The garden and the first palazzina were mostly completed by 1578 under the direction of the local architect and hydraulic engineer Tommaso Ghinucci. Carlo Maderno built the second palazzina for Cardinal Alessandro Peretti Montalto between 1611 and 1613. The two buildings were planned from the start and have identical exteriors. Their cubical form, with hipped roof and central belvedere, resembles those of the Villa Vecchia at Frascati and the hunting-lodge at Caprarola, both designed by Vignola. Rural and urban architectural traditions were united in the design of the buildings. The simple block with central projection recalls the towers and dovecotes typical of the countryside, while the exterior stone revetment and classical articulation is reminiscent of urban palaces. The floor plan is a variation on a common tripartite plan with a long central space. In the second ...

Article

F. Hamilton Hazlehurst

(b Saint-Jean-d’Angely, Charente-Maritime, c. 1562; d Paris, c. 1634).

French garden designer and theorist. Of Huguenot origin, he seems early to have enjoyed the favour of Henry of Navarre, later Henry IV. A respected member of the royal entourage, Boyceau was appointed Surintendant des Jardins du Roi in the succeeding reign of Louis XIII. Consequently, he was in a position to exert substantial influence in determining the nature of garden design at that time. In his Traité du jardinage, published in 1638, Boyceau succinctly summarized the history of French gardening and codified the rules that would govern the 17th-century formal garden. For the first time a French designer adopted an aesthetic point of view, thereby promoting the intellectual climate that was to establish gardening as a fine art. He introduced a new feeling for monumental scale to the French garden, insisting that it should reflect a strong sense of organic unity in which order, symmetry, and visual harmony would be all-pervasive....

Article

Cesi  

Donatella L. Sparti

Italian family of collectors. The family, whose origins were in the Umbrian town of Cesi, settled in Rome in the 15th century. In the 16th century they were celebrated for the splendour of the Giardino dei Cesi, a sculpture garden at their palace at the foot of the Gianicolo. This was established by Cardinal Paolo Emilio Cesi (b Rome, 1481; d Rome, 5 Aug 1537), who adorned the garden with antique (and contemporary) statuary. It was inherited by his brother Federico Cesi (b ?Rome, ?1 July 1500; d Rome, 28 Jan 1565), who became Cardinal in 1544 and who reorganized the garden and the palazzo so that it seemed like ‘the entrance to Paradise’ (Aldrovandi). He restored the statues and, above all, constructed an antique sculpture museum (destr. with the palazzo, 1940) with a Greek-cross plan, designed (1556–64) by Guidetto Guidetti and intended for small but precious pieces: it was one of the first buildings constructed purposely as a ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

English country house and garden in Hertfordshire built for Cecil family §(2), Earl of Salisbury, between 1607 and 1612. The U-shaped house is a distinguished example of a Jacobean nobleman’s house, with a central hall and two symmetrical wings. The large two-storey hall with its minstrels’ gallery and plastered ceiling is a development of the English medieval hall. The state apartments are on the first floor, in the Italian style. The oak staircase that leads to these apartments is one of the finest in England.

The east garden was initially laid out on two terraces by Thomas Chandler, but in 1611 Caus, de family §(1) redesigned the garden, though he retained the services of Simon Sturtevant, Chandler’s water engineer. Water ran from the grand Fountain of Neptune in a garden laid out in parterres down to a water-garden for which Sturtevant built the hydraulics, which included a stream and fountains on an island with a pavilion. The collection of plants from the botanical gardens of the Netherlands, France and Italy was entrusted to John Tradescant (...

Article

Gordon Campbell

[Fr.: entrelacs]

Small garden where clipped, low-growing plants are laid out in a series of continuous interlacing bands. The term knot garden is sometimes used in 15th-century English to refer to a maze and in 16th- and 17th-century English to a French parterre (formal flower garden). Knot gardens seem to have originated in the knot designs of carpets and rugs imported into Europe from the Middle East in the 15th century.

The knot garden reached its apogee in England and France with designs printed in Thomas Hill’s The Profitable Art of Gardening (1568, 1608) and in L’Agriculture et la maison rustique (1564, 1570, 1572, 1582) by Charles Estienne and Jean Liébault; the 1572 edition was translated into English as Maison rustique, or the country farm by Richard Surflet in 1600, and the 1608 edition of Hill’s text replaces the knot design of the earlier edition with one borrowed from the ...

Article

French royal château, west of Paris in the Yvelines département. It was begun c. 1124 by Louis VI (reg 1108–37) as a fortified hunting-lodge in the forests of St Germain and Marly on the site of a 10th-century monastery founded by Robert the Pious (reg 996–1031). Around 1238 Louis IX replaced an earlier chapel of 1223 built by Philip II Augustus (reg 1180–1223) with the present Sainte Chapelle, consisting of three bays and an apse (much restored in the 19th century). It has portals, a rose window and sharp tracery details that are clearly by the same hand as the later parts of the abbey church of Saint-Denis (1231–41) and not, as often claimed, by Pierre de Montreuil. It served as a prototype for the Sainte Chapelle in Paris. In c. 1370 Charles V rebuilt the château on an irregular rhomboid plan.

In 1539 Francis I decided to rebuild Saint-Germain, using ...

Article

Twickel  

Dutch garden near Delden, in the province of Overijssel. In the 17th century the gardens were designed in typical Dutch Renaissance style, with canals, parterres and woodland. In 1676 Jacob van Wassenaer Obdam married a descendant of Herman van Twickelo and commissiond Daniel Marot I to redesign the gardens. Marot’s remaining design shows intricate parterres, bordered at the top with a semicircular canal, which appears in a mid-18th-century map of the garden; this also shows that further changes were made, including the introduction of parterres in the Rococo style and a small English garden, probably an early example of such a garden in the Netherlands. In 1765 the garden was opened to the public. Between 1770 and 1794 the garden was increasingly anglicized and the formal design gradually gave way to a landscape (although the older structure remained visible) and Marot’s canal became an irregular lake. On the lake was a thatched hut, possibly after a design by ...