1-3 of 3 results  for:

  • Film and Video x
  • Books, Manuscripts, and Illustration x
  • Photography x
Clear all

Article

Maria Elena Buszek

(b Toronto, 1958).

Canadian photographer, video artist, and writer, active in USA. Davey variously studied design, drawing, and painting at Montreal’s Concordia University, finally settling on photography, in which she received a BFA in 1982. She later earned an MFA at the University of California San Diego, and began post-graduate studies at the Whitney Independent Study Program in 1988. Frustrated by the tendencies of such contemporaries as Andreas Gursky and Gregory Crewdson to, as she put it, ‘overproduce, overenlarge, overconsume’, Davey sought rather to draw on ‘the inherently surrealist, contingent, “found” quality of the vernacular photograph’(Davey 2014).

Davey’s photographs and videos consist predominantly of quiet vignettes from everyday life: homes filled with dusty, over-stuffed shelves, crammed with books, albums, bottles, and art supplies, and tables with momentary arrangements of these objects in use; lovingly rendered still-lifes of the near extinct, ad-hoc displays of button vendors, newsstands, and hi-fi equipment; always suggesting but rarely depicting the acquisitive, inquisitive people living and working in these humble, very much lived-in spaces. Her breakthrough ...

Article

Francis Summers

(b Dallas, TX, June 24, 1951).

American photographer. Nicosia studied Radio, Television and Film at the University of North Texas, Denton, completing his studies in 1974. His early photographic work used a frenetic comic book style, with actors expressively posed in front of bizarre hand painted backdrops, as in Near (Modern) Disaster no. 5 (1983; see 1999 exh. cat., p. 51). Nicosia moved away from such cartoon-style work and began to make more considered, although still staged, portraits such as Danny & Conny (1985; see 1988 exh. cat., p. 54). With his Real Pictures series, Nicosia moved out of contrived studio situations and used actors outdoors, as well as black-and-white film in pursuit of greater realism. Works such as Real Pictures no. 8 (1989; see 1999 exh. cat., p. 55), a dispassionately framed image of a man threatening a clown from his car, showed Nicosia’s interest in a collision of the morbid and the absurd. Nicosia subsequently made works both in the studio, such as ...

Article

Trevor Fawcett

This article is principally concerned with the mechanical or semi-mechanical reproduction in two dimensions of paintings, sculpture, drawings and the decorative arts in the Western world. See also Book illustration; Copy; Electroplating; Mass production; Periodical §I; Photography §I; and Prints §III.

The validity of reproductions depends on their acceptance as reasonable substitutes for unavailable ‘original’ works of art. (In turn the concept of ‘originals’ presupposes the existence of reproductions and other derivatives.) Unlike the handmade copy or duplicate, reproductions are created in multiple copies, each one theoretically identical, by means of some partly or wholly mechanized process. The closer they resemble their prototype in dimensions, medium, composition, colour and finish, the more they approach the ideal of facsimile. However, the vast majority of reproductions are executed in a medium different from their originals and on a smaller scale, as for example most engravings or photographs after paintings. Until recently, moreover, black-and-white reproductions have far outnumbered those in colour. With works of sculpture and decorative art a further distancing occurs when three-dimensional forms are converted into two-dimensional images. Such flattened versions may nevertheless often be preferred for their cheapness and convenience over solid replicas such as casts and electrotypes....