1-3 of 3 results  for:

  • Twentieth-Century Art x
  • Building/Structure x
Clear all

Article

Mark Dike DeLancey

[Jenne] [Friday Mosque]

Malian mosque that was built in 1906–7 in the Sudanese style under the direction of master mason Ismaïla Traoré. Local historical traditions state that a mosque was first built on this site in the 12th century, replacing the palace of Djenné’s ruler Koi Konboro after he converted to Islam. By the turn of the 20th century the mosque was in ruins.

The mosque’s heavy earthen walls (see fig.) are inset with wooden timbers that act as scaffolding for replastering, while numerous pilasters create a sense of verticality. The horizontal emphasis of the eastern qibla wall is broken by three huge towers, creating a rhythmic alternation of reserved horizontal wall surfaces and projecting vertical towers. Towers in the centre of the north and south walls provide rooftop access for the call to prayer via internal staircases. A monumental entrance on the north side is composed of three projecting pillars enclosing two deep recesses. Seven projections at the top of the portal echo the tops of the pilasters extending beyond the roofline of the mosque walls....

Article

Julia Robinson

American artists’ space located at 239 Thompson Street at the south edge of Washington Square in New York City. Beginning in the late 1950s the Judson Church hosted experimental avant-garde activities—art installations, Happenings, the beginnings of postmodern dance—launching a now celebrated group of artists, dancers, poets and composers, and fueling the radical downtown art scene. The platform of free expression Judson provided for the untested work of the 1960s generation, at a time when these artists were far from established, was a critical contribution to the invention, originality and ultimate international renown of these preeminent American artists.

Built in 1890 and designed by the renowned architect Stanford White (of McKim, Mead & White), the church’s original mission was to serve the immigrant population of Lower Manhattan with health and recreational programs as well as religious services. In the 1950s Reverend Bob Spike (1949–55) asked his seminary intern, Budd Scott, to go into the neighborhood and spend time with the locals—including a significant contingent of struggling artists—to discover their needs. Scott found out that the artists urgently needed a place to present their work. Judson’s national reputation for fostering radical artistic practice came under the tenure of Reverend Howard Moody (...

Article

Phyllis Lambert

(New York)

Office building at 375 Park Avenue in midtown New York City by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Philip Johnson (see fig.), which marked a pivotal moment in the history of architecture. It was commissioned in the euphoria of post-war America in November 1954 by Samuel Bronfman, owner of the Canadian distillery Seagram. Bronfman’s daughter, Phyllis Lambert, then 27, was director of planning and, as such, effectively the client, selecting the architect as well as establishing the ethics for a building meant to represent the best of modern society. With such a broad mandate, the Seagram Building would bear responsibility not only to the people who would occupy it but to an expanded, even global audience.

The Seagram Building created a rare triumvirate in New York City’s broadest and most majestic street, Park Avenue, between 52nd and 53rd Streets; it was sited directly opposite McKim, Mead & White...