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A. Gerhardt

Benedictine abbey on the River Enns in Styria, Austria. It was founded in the mid-11th century by Bishop Gebhard from Salzburg, endowed by St Henna von Gurk, Gräfin von Friessach (d 1045), and settled by Benedictine monks from St Peter’s, Salzburg under Abbot Isingrin. The Romanesque minster (consecrated 1074), which was dedicated to St Blaise, was famous for its marble columns and was rebuilt after a fire in 1152; a Gothic choir was added in 1276–86. The present church incorporates Romanesque side doors as well as other fragments. The abbey became an important cultural centre with a renowned scriptorium. Amongst the many famous scholars there was Abbot Engelbert of Admont (reg 1297–1327). From 1121 to the 16th century a convent was attached to the abbey. Under the abbots Mathias Preininger (reg 1615–28) and Urban Weber (reg 1628–59) the whole establishment was transformed in the Baroque style, and the church was rebuilt (...

Article

Tadeusz Chrzanowski

(fl 1670; d Jan 30, 1707).

Polish goldsmith, engraver and writer. He produced engraved frontispieces for J. Liberius’s book The Blessed Virgin Mary’s Sea Star (1670) and his own work St Elegius’s Life … (1687). He is noted in the guild records from 1689. Few of his silver pieces have been identified, as he did not use name marks. The impressive monstrance in St Mary’s church in Kraków is attributed to him. Works that are certainly by him include the ‘robes’ on the painting of the Holy Virgin in the Dominican church in Kraków and the small plate from the tabernacle in St Anne’s, Kraków. Ceypler’s most important work is an octagonal reliquary for the head of St Jan Kanty (1695; Kraków, St Anne), signed in Latin. It was designed by King John III’s court painter, Jerzy Eleuter Szymonowicz-Siemiginowski (c. 1660–1711), and was executed by Ceypler with the help of his pupil, ...

Article

Klaus Lankheit

(Johann)

(b ?April 9, 1691; d Mannheim, Jan 11, 1752).

German sculptor, stuccoist, draughtsman and illustrator. He was the most important sculptor active in Franconia and the Palatinate in the first half of the 18th century; nevertheless, although his very individual late Baroque sculpture, mostly carved in wood, was highly regarded by his contemporaries, he was quickly forgotten after his death. His rich oeuvre was severely depleted, particularly as a result of World War II. It was only after that date that his importance was reassessed. Egell probably served an apprenticeship with the Würzburg sculptor Balthasar Esterbauer (1672–1722) and collaborated on the interior decoration of the Banz monastery. His first documented work is an expressive Crucifix made in 1716 for St Michael’s Monastery in Bamberg (now in St Otto, Bamberg). His stylistic development was affected by his work between 1716–17 and 1719 as one of the team directed by Balthasar Permoser, which made all the sculptural decorations at the Zwinger in Dresden for ...

Article

Frans Baudouin

(b Antwerp, Jan 10, 1610; d Antwerp, June 21, 1666).

Flemish painter, illuminator and printmaker. He is one of the rediscovered minor masters of the 17th-century Flemish school. He was educated in the humanities at the Jesuit college in Antwerp, but it is not known with whom he studied painting. In 1631–2 he was enrolled as a master in the Guild of St Luke in Antwerp.

Until the 1960s Fruytiers was known only as the author of a few excellent miniature portraits in watercolour and gouache on paper or vellum. One of the earliest, Family on a Terrace (1638; sold, London, Sotheby’s, 25 Feb 1959, lot 15), includes a painter at work, which may be a self-portrait. The best-known miniature, Four Children of Rubens and Hélène Fourment with Two Servants (1638; Windsor Castle, Berks, Royal Col.), is probably the portrait of the children mentioned in the inventory of Rubens’s estate in 1641, on which the costs of the frame and glass were still owing....

Article

Annamaria Negro Spina

(b Florence, 1618; d after 1661).

Italian painter and engraver. He was a pupil of Francesco Furini (Bartsch). His most important work is a series of engravings for Leonardo Agostini’s book Le gemme antiche figurate (Rome, 1657–9). He also produced several collections of engravings of low reliefs and friezes by Polidoro da Caravaggio, published by Vincenzo Belly in Opere di Polidoro da Caravaggio (Rome, 1658). His engraving after Giovanni Francesco Grimaldi’s Triumph of Piety dates from the same year. He was an accomplished draughtsman and his attractive, light and sketchy engraving style is close to that of Stefano della Bella. He completed and signed the Sixth Death (see Vesme and Massar, no. 92), one of the latter’s uncompleted plates for the series the Dance of Death. There is only one known painting by Galestruzzi, a Magdalene owned by the Accademia di S Luca in Rome; the artist was a member of the Accademia from ...

Article

Hannes Etzlstorfer

(b Ovelgönne, nr Oldenburg, c. 1615; d after 1678).

German painter. The son of a bookkeeper at the corn exchange, he was known because of a disability as ‘the Ovelgönne mute’. An aristocratic sponsor, probably Graf Anton Günther (1603–67) of Oldenburg, sent him to train in the Netherlands: stylistic considerations would suggest that this was in the 1630s. The Evening Scene (1637; ex-art market, Berlin; Göttsche, no. 8) shows him adapting the style of Caravaggio as practised in Utrecht to the kind of social gathering depicted by Dirck Hals or Anthonie Palamedesz. He uses an artificial light source to exaggerate the modelling of the figures and the space. This characteristic of his art also shows in the Evening Banquet of 1640 (Vienna, Ksthist. Mus.), which might represent a stop on a southward journey to Italy: works from this time suggest contact with southern Germany and Austria. It is only after his arrival in Italy, working under the influence of Gerrit van Honthorst, that Heimbach’s painting achieves a dramatic impact. His ...

Article

Heinrich Geissler

(b Metzingen, Württemberg, 1591; d Nuremberg, 1661).

German painter and draughtsman. He completed his apprenticeship, no doubt in Stuttgart, before 1611, when he is recorded as a journeyman working in Nuremberg. He was in Venice and Rome in 1614: a book of travel sketches is filled with copies after Veronese, Taddeo Zuccaro and others (pages, Brunswick, Herzog Anton Ulrich-Mus.; Coburg, Veste Coburg). He was already using a secret script containing Cyrillic letters in inscriptions on drawings at that time. Contact with Italian art drew him away from Mannerism, a move expressed in the sturdy, thickset ‘non-artistic’ figures in his drawings. He travelled in Swabia (1617–20) before returning to Nuremberg, where he obtained his master’s certificate in 1622.

Herr’s work seems extraordinarily varied in terms of both style and content. It includes religious allegories (with a Protestant slant) and secular stories, vedute, genre paintings and many portraits, for example Andreas Imhoff III (1635; Nuremberg, Ger. Nmus.). The numerous drawings, often monogrammed, reveal him as a fresh and enthralling narrator, almost in the folklore tradition, with an early Baroque realism. As a Protestant, he showed an early preference for genre themes inspired from the Netherlands. His scenes of contemporary life include ...

Article

(b Rome, c. 1585; d Rome, Nov 6, 1641).

Italian architect. Writing about the time of Peparelli’s death, Baglione said that Peparelli was so sought after that he was employed on more than 70 palace, convent and church commissions. But guidebook attributions and documents give him only about 20 commissions (all in Rome); by 1730 Lione Pascoli mentioned him as an ‘architetto non molto conosciuto’. Peparelli enlarged the Villa Mattei in 1620–22 for Giovanni Battista Mattei, son of the original patron Ciriaco. He rebuilt S Brigida in Piazza Farnese in 1614 or 1640 and in 1632–5 built the oratory behind the nearby church of S Girolamo della Carità. From 1631 to 1637 he was the architect, with Vincenzo della Greca, of S Caio, a Barberini foundation on the Via Pia (destr. 1885). He designed the sacristy, transept, cupola and choir of S Maria in Traspontina in 1635–7, rebuilt S Salvatore in Campo for Francesco Barberini in 1639 and, with ...

Article

Cristina Gonzalez

(b Sahagún, León, 1499; d Mexico, 1590).

Spanish writer, missionary, linguist, and ethnographer. Bernardino de Sahagún wrote and compiled the Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España (c. 1577), a comprehensive account of the Aztecs. Before arriving in New Spain (Mexico), he studied at the prestigious Universidad de Salamanca, one of the principle centers of culture in western Europe. He took the habit of the Franciscans while still a student. In 1529, at the invitation of friar Antonio de Ciudad Rodrigo, one of the twelve Franciscan friars to arrive in Mexico with Martín de Valencia in 1524, he sailed to New Spain as a missionary. In Mexico City he witnessed the ruins of the Templo Mayor and, according to friar Juan de Torquemada, commissioned a painting of the site and sent it to Spain. He was custodian of the monastery in Tlalmanalco and also resided at the monastery in Xochimilco before becoming a teacher of classics and history at the trilingual imperial Colegio de Santa Cruz de Tlatelolco in ...

Article

Paola Pacht Bassani

(b Tours, May 19, 1593; d Paris, May 10, 1670).

French painter, printmaker and illustrator . Born into a prosperous family in Tours, he received his early training in Paris, probably in Jacob Bunel’s studio. In 1609–10 he travelled to Rome; although his presence there is recorded only in 1618–20, he was probably based there throughout that decade, becoming a member of the community of young French artists that included Simon Vouet and Valentin de Boullogne. They were all predominantly influenced by the art of Caravaggio and of his most direct follower Bartolomeo Manfredi. Vignon’s severe half-length figures (St Paul, Turin, Gal. Sabauda; Four Church Fathers, on loan to Cambridge, Fitzwilliam), executed possibly even earlier than 1615, are in a Caravaggesque style, as are his paintings of singers, musicians and drinkers (e.g. the Young Singer, Paris, Louvre), although the latter group owes more to the style of contemporary genre painting. However, Vignon was already showing an interest in new artistic experiments, the origins of which were northern, Venetian and Mannerist. His sensitivity to the splendid colouring of Venice and to the art of Jacques Bellange, Georges Lallemand and Jacques Callot is manifest in his ...