1-20 of 61 results  for:

  • South/Southeast Asian Art x
Clear all

Article

D. W. MacDowall, W. Ball, Gregory L. Possehl, Maurizio Taddei, C. Fabrègues, E. Errington, N. Hatch Dupree, Sheila S. Blair, Jonathan M. Bloom and F. Tissot

Country of some 647,500 sq. km in the middle of the steppe and desert zone of Eurasia. It is bounded on the north by the Amu (Oxus) River and the republics of Central Asia, on the west by Iran and on the south and east by the Indian subcontinent. In the Pamir Mountains to the north-east, a narrow tongue of land known as the Wakhan corridor links the country with China (see fig.). Located at the crossroads of major trade and migration routes between the Mediterranean, Central Asia, India and China, the region has been subjected to diverse cultural influences throughout its history.

The physical geography of Afghanistan is very varied and includes formidable mountain ranges, fertile valleys and barren deserts. The dominant mountainous core is the Hindu Kush, an extension of the Karakoram and Pamir mountains that stretches south-west for some 965 km and has peaks rising to some 5180 m in height. To the north, between the Hindu Kush and the Amu River lie the semi-desert plains of Turkestan. South of the Hindu Kush is a transitional zone of plateaux with broad mountain valleys. To the west and south-west the mountains gradually descend to the stony and sandy deserts of the Iranian plateau. North of Kabul the Kuh-e-Baba range (‘Grandfather Mountains’) of the Hindu Kush is the watershed for four great Afghan rivers: the Kabul River flowing east to the Indus, the Kunduz flowing north into the Amu River, the Hari Rud flowing west to Herat and the Helmand, which flows southwards into the marshy lake of Hamun Helmand in Sistan. There are several passes through the mountainous core of the country linking north to south and east to west, and traffic is also channelled along the rivers or round the mountain mass. The low-lying plains and deserts between Herat and Kandahar provide an easy route for traders and invaders travelling eastwards into the Indus Valley....

Article

Perween Hasan and Hameeda Hossain

Country in the north-east of the Indian subcontinent, bounded in the south by the Bay of Bengal, on the south-east by Burma (Myanmar) and on all other sides by India. Although a small country of 144,000 sq. km, it supports a population of 147 million (2006 estimate). The region formed part of British India, and in 1947, on partition of the subcontinent at the time of independence, it became East Pakistan. In 1971, following civil war with West Pakistan, it established itself as the independent state of Bangladesh with its capital at Dhaka (Dacca). This entry focuses mainly on the art produced in the country since 1971. For art of the area in earlier times see appropriate sections of Indian subcontinent and entries for Dhaka, Gaur and Rajshahi.

Perween Hasan

In terms of geography, much of Bangladesh is a vast delta traversed by numerous rivers (see fig.). The climate is monsoonal, with high humidity throughout the year. Coastal areas are particularly susceptible to cyclonic storms. Of the population, 98% are ...

Article

Françoise Pommaret

[Drukyul]

The country lies on the southern slopes of the Himalaya, bounded by the Tibetan Autonomous Region of China to the north and India to the south, east and west (see fig.). The capital is Thimphu. The country’s various languages, with the exception of Nepali, belong to the Tibeto–Burman group, and the state religion is Vajrayana or Tantric Buddhism. (For a discussion of Vajrayana Buddhism, see Buddhism, §III, 6, and Nepal, §I, 3, (ii).)

Bhutan, with an area of 45,000 sq. km., can be described as a gigantic staircase, rising from narrow southern lowlands at 300 m above sea-level to northern peaks of over 7000 m. Three relief zones—the foothills, the inner Himalaya, where the valleys are situated, and the high Himalaya—also define three broad climatic regions: tropical, temperate with monsoon and alpine. These variations, coupled with the dramatic changes in altitude, make Bhutan a country with an extremely rich flora....

Article

Philip Stott, G. E. Marrison, Judith Patt, Wibke Lobo, Guy Nafilyan, J. Dumarçay, Madeleine Giteau, Michel Jacq-Hergoualc’h, Patricia Naenna, Michael Hitchcock, Miranda Bruce-Mitford, Robin Ruizendaal, Dawn F. Rooney, Robert S. Wicks, Hak Srea Kuoch and Sian E. Jay

[Kampuchea]

Country in South-east Asia, bordering Thailand, Laos and Vietnam, with a seacoast on the Gulf of Thailand (see fig.). Cambodia was the heartland of the Khmer empire of Angkor, which flourished between the 9th and the 15th centuries ad.

Philip Stott

The geography of Cambodia is dominated by the Mekong River and its tributaries. Three-quarters of the country consists of a rich alluvial plain, the largest in South-east Asia. The lowlands are hemmed in by high mountains, once densely forested, which border Thailand, Laos and Vietnam. In the centre of the plain lies the Tonle Sap (Great Lake), which in the dry season is 208 km long and has an average depth of only 2.2 m, but during the wet season of the south-west monsoon (May to early October) can quadruple in size. When this occurs, the flow of the Tonle Sap River, which joins the Mekong at Phnom Penh, is reversed and much of the Mekong floodwater is diverted into the lake. The ensuing flood provides water for rice production and an abundant harvest of fish. Situated to the north of the lake are the remains of the successive capital cities of the empire of Angkor, for which floodwater-retreat agriculture was the economic base. ...

Article

Erberto F. Lo Bue

In 

Article

Article

Philip Stott, John Villiers, Henry Ginsburg, Alistair Shearer, M. C. Subhadradis Diskul, Stanley J. O’Connor, Hak Srea Kuoch, J. Dumarçay, Michael Smithies, Miranda Bruce-Mitford, John Shaw, Dawn F. Rooney, Virginia Di Crocco, Patricia Naenna, Elaine T. Lewis, Sian E. Jay, Robert S. Wicks, Sonia Krug and Somporn Rodboon

In 

Article

Philip Stott

In 

Article

Philip Stott, G. E. Marrison, Judith Patt, Wibke Lobo, Guy Nafilyan, J. Dumarçay, Madeleine Giteau, Michel Jacq-Hergoualc’h, Patricia Naenna, Michael Hitchcock, Miranda Bruce-Mitford, Robin Ruizendaal, Dawn F. Rooney, Robert S. Wicks, Hak Srea Kuoch and Sian E. Jay

In 

Article

Article

Philip Stott, John Villiers, Henry Ginsburg, Alistair Shearer, M. C. Subhadradis Diskul, Stanley J. O’Connor, Hak Srea Kuoch, J. Dumarçay, Michael Smithies, Miranda Bruce-Mitford, John Shaw, Dawn F. Rooney, Virginia Di Crocco, Patricia Naenna, Elaine T. Lewis, Sian E. Jay, Robert S. Wicks, Sonia Krug and Somporn Rodboon

In 

Article

Pierre Pichard

In 

Article

Philip Stott, G. E. Marrison, Judith Patt, Wibke Lobo, Guy Nafilyan, J. Dumarçay, Madeleine Giteau, Michel Jacq-Hergoualc’h, Patricia Naenna, Michael Hitchcock, Miranda Bruce-Mitford, Robin Ruizendaal, Dawn F. Rooney, Robert S. Wicks, Hak Srea Kuoch and Sian E. Jay

In 

Article

Article

Erberto F. Lo Bue

In 

Article

Michael Hitchcock, Sheila S. Blair and Jonathan M. Bloom

In 

Article

Article

Virginia Di Crocco and Pierre Pichard

In 

Article

Philip Stott, G. E. Marrison, Judith Patt, Wibke Lobo, Guy Nafilyan, J. Dumarçay, Madeleine Giteau, Michel Jacq-Hergoualc’h, Patricia Naenna, Michael Hitchcock, Miranda Bruce-Mitford, Robin Ruizendaal, Dawn F. Rooney, Robert S. Wicks, Hak Srea Kuoch and Sian E. Jay

In 

Article

T. Richard Blurton, Sunand Prasad, Geeta Kapur, Walter Smith, Rosemary Crill, Ratan Parimoo, S. J. Vernoit, Daniel Ehnbom, M. C. Joshi and James H. Nye

Country in South Asia founded following the withdrawal of the British from the Indian subcontinent in 1947. Inaugurated in 1950, it was formed from the accession of British and princely India but excluded the territory of what became the Muslim nations of Pakistan and Bangladesh (originally West and East Pakistan), its two neighbours to west and east. In the late 20th century India consists of 26 states and 7 union territories. This survey focuses on the arts produced since 1947. For discussion of earlier periods, see under Indian subcontinent.

T. Richard Blurton

India is a country of great size and geographical variety. To the north are the Himalaya, the highest mountains in the world. Further south is the massive plain, created over many centuries by rivers running out of the Himalaya and depositing rich alluvium as they drain to the sea. The greatest of these rivers are the Yamuna, the Brahmaputra and, pre-eminently, the Ganga. To the south of the river plains is the broken country of the Vindhya Hills, while the great mass of upland still further south is known as the Deccan. The coastal regions ringing the Deccan plateau are low and flat and are the location of large towns and cities. These fertile tracts become more pronounced in south India, with a commensurate diminution of the upland; much of the state of Tamil Nadu consists of lush lowland....