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A. Gerhardt

Benedictine abbey on the River Enns in Styria, Austria. It was founded in the mid-11th century by Bishop Gebhard from Salzburg, endowed by St Henna von Gurk, Gräfin von Friessach (d 1045), and settled by Benedictine monks from St Peter’s, Salzburg under Abbot Isingrin. The Romanesque minster (consecrated 1074), which was dedicated to St Blaise, was famous for its marble columns and was rebuilt after a fire in 1152; a Gothic choir was added in 1276–86. The present church incorporates Romanesque side doors as well as other fragments. The abbey became an important cultural centre with a renowned scriptorium. Amongst the many famous scholars there was Abbot Engelbert of Admont (reg 1297–1327). From 1121 to the 16th century a convent was attached to the abbey. Under the abbots Mathias Preininger (reg 1615–28) and Urban Weber (reg 1628–59) the whole establishment was transformed in the Baroque style, and the church was rebuilt (...

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Lucília Verdelho da Costa

Cistercian abbey in Portugal. The abbey, dedicated to S Maria, was founded as part of the policy of repopulation and territorial improvement of the first king of Portugal, Alfonso I (reg 1139–85), who in 1152 granted a large area of land to St Bernard of Clairvaux by a charter known as the Carta dos Coutos (Lisbon, Arquiv. N.). Work on the monastery started in 1158 and adhered to the rigid precepts of the Order. Although the exterior was extended and altered in the 17th and 18th centuries, especially the Baroque façade of the church, the interior essentially preserves its original Early Gothic appearance.

W. Beckford: Recollections of an Excursion to the Monasteries of Alcobaça and Batalha (London, 1835/R 1972) M. V. Natividade: Ignez de Castro e Pedro o Cru perante a iconografia dos seus túmulos (Lisbon, 1910) E. Korrodi: Alcobaça: Estudo histórico, arqueológico e artístico da Real Abadia de Alcobaça...

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Giuseppe Antonio Guazzelli

(b Sora, nr. Frosinone, Oct 30, 1538; d Rome, Jun 30, 1607).

Italian cardinal and church historian. A disciple of St. Filippo Neri and among the early and more influential members of the Congregation of the Oratory (Oratorians) established in Rome by Neri, as church historian, Baronio was involved in relevant projects promoted by the Roman Curia after the closure of the Council of Trent. As early as 1580 he collaborated on revising the Martyrologium Romanum, one of the post-Tridentine liturgical books, and then added to the same Martyrologium a general introduction and an extensive analytical commentary (respectively the Tractatio de Martyrologio Romano and the Notationes, both first published in 1586). Between 1588 and 1607 he published the Annales Ecclesiastici, in twelve volumes, where he dealt with church history from the birth of Christ down to 1198: such monumental erudite work was the main Catholic response to the Protestant Magdeburg Centuries (published 1559–1574). Different aspects of Baronio’s scholarly work are deeply linked. In his ...

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Rosa Barovier Mentasti

Italian family of glassmakers. The family are recorded as working in Murano, Venice, as early as 1324, when Iacobello Barovier and his sons Antonio Barovier and Bartolomeo Barovier (b Murano, ?1315; d Murano, ?1380) were working there as glassmakers. The line of descent through Viviano Barovier (b Murano, ?1345; d Murano, 1399) to Iacobo Barovier (b Murano, ?1380; d Murano, 1457) led to the more noteworthy Barovier family members of the Renaissance. Iacobo was responsible for public commissions in Murano from 1425 to 1450. From as early as 1420 he was a kiln overseer, with a determining influence on the fortunes of the Barovier family.

During the 15th century Iacobo’s sons, notably Angelo Barovier (b Murano, ?1400; d Murano, 1460), and his sons Giovanni Barovier, Maria Barovier, and Marino Barovier (b Murano, before 1431; d Murano, 1485) were important glassmakers. From as early as ...

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Philip J. Jacks

(b La Vittoriosa, Malta, 1575; d Rome, Sept 5, 1629).

Italian antiquary. He was the illegitimate son of Giovanni Ottone, vice-chancellor of the Hieronymite Order. Between 1587 and 1589 he studied law at the Collegio Romano in Rome. He soon began to investigate Early Christian history, enlarging upon the work of his mentor, Onofrio Panvinio (d 1569), whose De ritu sepeliendi mortuos (Rome, 1569) recorded for the first time a total of 43 Roman cemeteries. In 1593 Bosio and Pompeo Ugonio, his professor of letters at the Sapienza, undertook the first exploration of the Catacombs of Domitilla on the Via Ardeatina (see Rome, §V, 13). This was followed by other discoveries: the cemetery of Ciriaca on the Via Tiburtina (1593); the Catacombs of SS Pietro and Marcellino on the Via Labicana; the Catacombs of S Valentino on the Via Flaminia and the underground basilicas in the Catacombs of SS Trasone and Saturnino on the Via Salaria Nuova (...

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Gordon Marshall Beamish

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Patrick M. de Winter

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