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Chris Brooks

(b London, Sept 7, 1814; d London, Feb 23, 1900).

English architect and designer. He committed his feelings and creative energies to the High Anglicanism of the Oxford Movement from the early 1840s and to its expression through the revival of Gothic architecture and design, then vociferously advocated by the Ecclesiological Society, of which he became an active member. Butterfield’s extensive output was almost exclusively confined to the building and restoration of churches and associated buildings, such as vicarages and schools.

He was the eldest son of a London chemist, and his parents were Nonconformists. From 1831 to 1833 Butterfield was articled to a Pimlico builder, Thomas Arber, from whom he must have derived the detailed understanding of practical building that was to be basic to his architectural practice. Between 1833 and 1836 he was the pupil of E. L. Blackburne, a London architect with strong antiquarian interests, and in 1838–9 he became assistant to a Worcester architect, probably Harvey Eginton, whose practice included church building and restoration. During this period Butterfield must have begun to acquire the profound knowledge of medieval architecture that was to underlie all his work. In ...

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(b Stuttgart, Feb 2, 1789; d Hassfurt, Sept 28, 1865).

German architect, painter, sculptor, printmaker and writer. He belonged to a large family of artists descended from Franz Joseph (Ignatz Anton) Heideloff (1676–1772), who was a sculptor and possibly also a painter. He was trained by the architect Nikolaus Friedrich von Thouret, the sculptor Johann Heinrich von Dannecker and the painter Johann Baptist Seele. He also studied mural painting as assistant to his father, Victor (Wilhelm Peter) Heideloff (1757–1817). As a young man he became interested in Gothic and Romanesque architecture, and while he was in Mainz in 1814 he made the acquaintance of Ernest I, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (reg 1826–44), who employed him as his architect until 1821. In 1822, having settled in Nuremberg, he was appointed curator of the city’s historical monuments; he used this position to encourage widespread interest in early German art and to rescue many examples from destruction. He also taught at the local Polytechnische Schule from its foundation in ...

Article

Dimitris Tsougarakis

(b Athens, Dec 23, 1887; d Athens, Oct 6, 1979).

Greek architect and archaeologist. He graduated from the National Polytechnic at Athens as an architect in 1908 and gained his doctorate from the University of Athens in 1915, having studied ancient Greek architecture with Wilhelm Dörpfeld (1853–1940), prehistoric archaeology with Georg Karo (1872–1963), archaic sculpture with Rudolf Heberdey and epigraphy with Anton von Premerstein (d 1937). He was the architect for the restoration works (1910–17) on the Acropolis of Athens under Nikolaos Balanos (1852–1933). He served as director of restorations for the ancient monuments of Greece, apart from the Acropolis, from 1920 to 1942, and director of restorations for the monuments of Greece including the Acropolis from 1942 to 1958. He also held posts as professor of morphology and rhythmology at the National Polytechnic (1919–40); professor of the history of architecture also at the Polytechnic (1943–58); and professor of Byzantine archaeology at the University of Athens (...

Article

Peter Howell

(b Woodford, Essex, June 20, 1824; d London, Dec 18, 1881).

English architect. Widely regarded as the greatest British architect of his time, he played a crucial role in the development of the Gothic Revival between A. W. N. Pugin in the 1840s and its High Victorian climax. Street brought earnest conviction and great self-confidence to his work and won admiration even when his ideals were no longer considered fashionable. His concern for detail was prodigious: the Fellows of Magdalen College, Oxford, for example, were assured in 1879 that if they accepted his design for new buildings, ‘every detail, even the smallest, would, as his custom is, be drawn by him’, although this meant that his assistants and pupils had no opportunity to make independent designs. Through his many articles, books on Italian and Spanish architecture and lectures at the Royal Academy, Street wielded enormous influence and his buildings were greatly admired.

His father was a London solicitor, who retired in ...

Article

Jacqueline Colliss Harvey

(b Carmarthen, Dec 27, 1882; d Newton Abbot, Devon, Jan 11, 1952).

English art historian, writer, and conservator. He trained under Professor W. R. Lethaby at the Royal College of Art, London, and rose to become Professor of Design there from 1925 until his retirement in 1946, when he was made Professor Emeritus. He was an acknowledged expert on medieval wall paintings, particularly their preservation, although his technical methods are now known to have been unsound. He was also a highly influential teacher on the subject and did much to bring the interest and value of medieval painting to public attention. He worked on the preservation and restoration of wall paintings at Westminster Abbey, the Palace of Westminster, and Eton College (Berks), among other sites, and in the cathedrals of Norwich, Exeter, Winchester, and Christchurch, Oxford, as well as on the Pre-Raphaelite murals in the Oxford Union Library. He gave a large collection of his drawings of medieval wall paintings to the ...