1-2 of 2 results  for:

  • Performance Art and Dance x
  • 1300–1400 x
Clear all

Article

Rowan Watson

(b ?Reims, c. 1300; d ?April 13, 1377).

French composer and poet. He was the most prolific and inventive poet and composer of his day. His texts and manuscripts characterize the taste of the royal court in mid-14th-century France. From c. 1323 to 1346 he was in the service of John of Luxembourg, King of Bohemia, after which he served members of the French royal family, among them Jean, Duc de Berry. Despite a peripatetic career, Machaut’s chief home was in Reims, where he finally became a canon in 1337, and where the Dauphin, the future Charles V, had him sought from his house during a visit to the city in 1361.

Machaut’s autobiographical poem Voir-dit (1362–5) shows his working methods. In his mature years at least, he dictated work to a secretary and could call on the services of copyists. Mention of Machaut’s Livre où je met toutes mes choses in the poem appears to refer to a personal copy of his works, possibly partly in his own hand, that was unbound to facilitate copying, re-ordering, and further additions. Miniatures showing the poet writing upon a roll refer to another means by which he transmitted texts, particularly suited for performance or reading aloud....

Article

John Richards

(b Rigoli, nr Pisa, 1348; d Pisa, after 1438).

Italian painter. The style of the altarpiece that is probably Turino’s earliest extant work, the Virgin and Child with Saints, Archangels and Angel Musicians (c. 1380; Palermo, Mus. Reg.), suggests he was influenced by Sienese painting, but this may have come via Barnaba da Modena, whose Madonna dei Mercanti (Pisa, Mus. N. S Matteo) is exactly reproduced in the central group. A Baptism of Christ of c. 1390 (Pisa, Mus. N. S Matteo) is closely based on the panel by Niccolò di Pietro Gerini (London, N.G.). In 1397 Turino signed and dated a panel of the Virgin and Child with Two Saints and Two Blessed (Pisa, S Paolo a Ripa d’Arno). In this and panels of the Virgin and Child with Angels (Paris, Louvre) and the Virgin Annunciate and the Archangel Gabriel (both c. 1395; Pisa, Mus. N. S Matteo) Turino’s style is more robust. Figures are larger and more ponderous, recalling earlier Florentine painting. Between ...