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Diana Buitron-Oliver

In 

Article

Gordon Campbell

German porcelain factory near Jena, Thuringia, which produced fine domestic wares from 1901 to 1929. The company was owned by Ferdinand Selle, and its designers included Henry Van de Velde and Albin Müller (1871–1941), both of whom designed well-known breakfast services (1907 and 1910).

B. Fritz...

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Gordon Campbell

English ceramics manufactory (also known as Wilcox and Co.) founded in Leeds in 1858, originally for the manufacture of bricks and building materials. In 1879 the firm began to produce tiles, display pottery and architectural faience; tiles from this period survive in the sumptuous bathroom of Gledhow Hall in Leeds (decorated for the visit of the Prince of Wales, ...

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Rupert Featherstone

Tool with a hard, smooth, tip, mounted in a wooden handle, used for smoothing or polishing. In water gilding, a burnisher of polished agate is used to smooth the underlying gesso and bole after the gold is applied, giving a highly reflective surface. Burnishers used to burnish ancient pots are depicted in Egyptian wall paintings from the 14th century ...

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Hugo Morley-Fletcher

(b Locarno, ?1723; d Munich, April 1763).

German porcelain modeller of Swiss birth. Although little is known about his early life, he is recorded as joining the Neudeck factory near Munich in November 1754 as Modellmeister; the factory was later moved to the Nymphenburg Palace, from which it then took its name. From that time until his death he produced one of the most remarkable series of porcelain figures ever modelled. Beginning with small Ovidian gods (e.g. Flora, 1755–8; Frankfurt am Main, Mus. Ksthandwk), nude putti with various classical attributes on fairly simple bases, he then made a series of figures of street vendors including an egg seller (e.g. c. 1755; Hamburg, Mus. Kst & Gew.) and a mushroom seller. These early figures do not reflect the full Rococo movement of Bustelli’s later work. They do, however, display one essential characteristic of his entire oeuvre: a tendency to conceive his figures with faceted planiform surfaces, more reminiscent of wood-carving than clay-modelling, which may suggest that he was trained as a wood-carver. His figures seem to carry on in porcelain the rich traditions of the south German Rococo, and his first major compositions, including a Crucifix, a Virgin and a St John, are all in the direct tradition of south German ecclesiastical sculpture; at one time they were even ascribed to the sculptor ...

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Cabaret  

Gordon Campbell

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Annie Scottez-De Wambrechies

(b Paris, Dec 12, 1812; d Paris, March 13, 1893).

French painter. From 1825 to 1828 he was apprenticed as a decorator of porcelain at the Gouverneur Factory in Paris. He then studied under Camille Flers, who taught him to paint landscape en plein air and compelled him to sharpen his powers of observation of nature at the expense of the rules of classical landscape. In 1830 he visited Normandy and on his return to Paris he associated with two avant-garde painters, Philippe-Auguste Jeanron, founder of the Société Libre de Peinture et de Sculpture, and Jules Dupré. The latter was a committed member of the Barbizon school who sought to portray the truthfulness of nature in his landscapes rather than an arranged composition (see Barbizon school). In order to deepen their study of nature, Cabat and Dupré painted together in the Forest of Fontainebleau. In 1832 they also visited the region of Berry. The following year, Cabat exhibited for the first time at the Salon in Paris, where until ...

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Gordon Campbell

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Gordon Campbell

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Gordon Campbell

Germany pottery manufactory. In 1904 Emperor Willliam II founded an imperial pottery on his private estate near the East Prussian town of Cadinen (now the Polish town of Kadyny). The factory made imitations of classical and Renaissance pottery, and also produced original works by artists such as Adolf Amberg, Ludwig Manzel (...

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Gordon Campbell

One-piece teapot with no lid, filled through a hole in the bottom; the tea runs through a tube from the bottom to the top, and when the teapot is turned to an upright position the tea can be poured through the spout. The design was based on a Chinese wine-pot, of which an example must have been brought to England in the late 18th century, possibly by a member of the family of the Earl of Cadogan. Cadogan teapots were first manufactured in the early 19th century at the Rockingham Porcelain Factory and thereafter by other English manufacturers....

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Carmen Ravanelli Guidotti

Italian ceramic factory. In 1498 a maiolica factory was established in the Medici villa of Cafaggiolo, in the Mugello near Florence, by the brothers Piero and Stefano Schiavon family from Montelupo, a famous Tuscan centre of ceramics production. The factory was in production throughout the 16th century, and the products made for the grand dukes of Tuscany and other noble Florentine families reveal a remarkable pictorial zeal, which developed from decorative schemes influenced by the style of wares from Faenza, including alla porcellana (blue-and-white decoration inspired by Chinese porcelain) and grotesques and the rather showy and heraldic istoriato (narrative) scenes. Many of these works are stamped or marked underneath with the words in Chafagiollo or Chafaguotto or sometimes stamped with the famous sp monogram, by tradition ascribed to the Fattorini family (e.g. jug with a portrait of Leo X, c. 1515; Faenza, Mus. Int. Cer.). The strong incentive of an important, rich clientele lasted for several decades. When it declined, however, the factory’s production became increasingly mediocre during the 16th century and was finally supplanted by ...

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Kathy Niblett

(b Buenos Aires, Feb 8, 1930).

English potter. He became interested in pottery while at King’s College, Cambridge (1949–52), and took pottery evening classes at the Central School of Arts and Crafts, London (1954–5). In 1955 he founded Aldermaston Pottery, Berks, a cooperative workshop (closed down in 1993) of about seven potters making functional domesticware and tiles, as well as individual commissions and one-off pots. By trial and error he revived and perfected two virtually lost techniques: the use of tin glaze and painted pigments on red earthenware clay, and the firing of lustres on to tin glazes (e.g. earthenware bowl, 1968; London, V&A). He has also written extensively on both techniques.

Tin-glaze Pottery in Europe and the Islamic World: The Tradition of 1,000 Years in Maiolica, Faience and Delftware (London, 1973) with R. Lightbown, trans. G. Piccolpasso: I tre libri dell’arte del vasaio (1548) as The Three Books of the Potter’s Art...

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Gordon Campbell

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Carmen Ravanelli Guidotti

[Virgilio]

(fl Faenza, 1531; d Faenza, c. 1570).

Italian potter. He was the son of Giovanni da Calamello, and there are plenty of documents relating to him, especially after 1540, when as a practising potter he went to sell his wares in Bologna. He was so successful that citizenship was conferred on him. In Faenza his workshop was situated in the S Vitale quarter, where there were many other potteries during the 16th century. An inventory of 1556 (Grigioni, pp. 143–51) describes his economic position and the progress of his workshop. Apparently his was among the most well-established workshops in Faenza, able to produce huge table-services, including water jugs, salt-cellars, dishes and vases (e.g. vase with lion handles, c. 1550–60; Brunswick, Herzog Anton Ulrich-Mus.). In 1566, for health reasons, he handed his shop over to Leonardo Bettisi, known as Don Pino, also from Faenza. Calamelli is recognized as an important exponent of the Compendiario (sketchy) style, which was typical of the so-called ...

Article

Bernadette Nelson

Portuguese centre of ceramic production. Documents record kilns operating in the town in 1488, and the first potters were Álvaro Annes, Vicente Annes and Francisco Lopes. However, the modern ceramics tradition with which the town is associated dates to the time of a certain D. Maria ‘dos Cacos’, who is recorded as having attempted to sell his wares in fairs all over Portugal between 1820 and 1853. Pieces attributed to him are rare. He was succeeded by Manuel Cipriano Gomes (fl 1853–7) from Mafra. In addition to producing faience that resembled wares made in the Oporto factories (see Oporto §2), Gomes also produced a body of wares that were strongly influenced by the work of Palissy, Bernard.

In 1884 the Fábrica de Faianças das Caldas da Rainha was established in Lisbon, under the artistic direction of the painter Rafael Bordalo Pinheiro (see Bordalo Pinheiro family §(1)...

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Gordon Campbell

(b 1839; d 1901).

Italian pottery manufacturer. In 1878 he founded (together with his brother Giuseppe) the Manifattura Cantagalli in Florence. The factory made Islamic style tin-glazed earthenwares, and also produced imitations and copies of earlier Italian maiolica. In 1892 William De Morgan began spending winters in Florence, where he employed decorators at the Cantagalli pottery to paint his new designs and fired some of his pottery in the Cantagalli kilns; some pieces bear their joint signatures....

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Clare Le Corbeiller

Italian porcelain factory. It was founded in 1743 in the grounds of the Palazzo Reale di Capodimonte by Charles VII, King of Naples (later Charles III, King of Spain). The clear, white, soft-paste porcelain was developed by Livio Schepers (d 1757) and Gaetano Schepers (d after 1764). The chief modeller was Giuseppe Gricci and the principal painters were Giovanni Caselli (1698–1752), Giuseppe della Torre (fl 1744–c. 1764) and Johann Sigismund Fischer (fl 1750–58). The factory produced useful wares, sculpture and snuff-boxes. Some early decorative schemes were based on prototypes from the Saxon factory of Meissen. Painted subjects included battle scenes, allegorical figures and still-lifes stippled or painted in a subdued palette of browns, blues and greens and chinoiseries in brilliant colours. Religious figures were also produced, but most were of peasants or characters from the commedia dell’arte, composed as narrative couples or groups. Modelling was simple and effective more through mood and gesture than detail. Figures were sparsely decorated and costumes were simply trimmed with coloured or gilded borders. One of the factory’s most extraordinary achievements was the ...