141-160 of 175 results  for:

  • Conceptual Art x
  • 1900–2000 x
Clear all

Article

Catherine M. Grant

(b Macclesfield, Ches, Sept 18, 1968).

English conceptual artist, draughtsman, photographer, sculptor, painter and installation artist. He studied at the Glasgow School of Art between 1988 and 1991, graduating with a BFA. The concentration in the course on environmental art influenced Shrigley in his presentation of absurd sculptures and notices, as in Leisure Centre (1991; see M. Bracewell, p. 50). Here a small white box with the words ‘Leisure Centre’ written on it is pictured apparently abandoned on a piece of parkland by a road. During the 1990s Shrigley attracted particular attention with his drawings, some of which he published in small runs through his own Armpit Press ( see fig. ). His drawings and accompanying texts are a surreal mixture of mundane observations, ridiculous rules and regulations and violent encounters. These range from a quiz to distinguish television sets from microwaves, which he published in his artist’s book Err (London, 1996), to a comic strip about putting a man in a sack and burning him, under the title ...

Article

Article

Morgan Falconer

(b Los Angeles, 1949).

American artist. She received a BA from the University of California in 1970. Smith emerged from the conceptual art movement in Los Angeles in the early 1970s and initially showed an interest in narrative, arranging fragments of text sourced from fiction in sequences, often with objects attached to the paper. The Red Shoes (1975; see 1991–2 exh. cat., pp. 46–7), which featured, among a series of images, a picture of the Hollywood actress Alexis Smith on the cover of a magazine, is typical of her work at this time and suggests her growing preoccupation with Hollywood film. This interplay of biography, text and movies became a recurring feature of her work, as did her interest in the representation of women. In the late 1970s her use of texts became more eclectic and she began to produce large installations comprising collages, sculptures and wall paintings. The Chandlerisms series (1978...

Article

Midori Yoshimoto

(b Shizuoka, March 3, 1965).

Japanese conceptual artist, sculptor and installation artist . Sone earned an MA in architecture at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music (1992), but decided to experiment with a wider range of media in order to explore the concepts of futility and the unattainable. His first work, Her 19th Foot (1993), shown at the Art Tower, in Mito, and later in the Rooseum, in Malmö, consisted of 19 unicycles welded together for 19 cyclists to ride. As several attempts by different participants failed, the work implied the ‘impossibility of communal illusions’ (see Inoue). His next work, Artificial Lawn Performance (1994), consisted of four photographs that seemed to prove the fiction that Sone had laid Astroturf on the surface of the moon as part of NASA’s art programme. The nonsense of the grandiose act is heightened by the artificial quality evident in Sone’s pseudo-documentary photographs. For the opening of the Expo ...

Article

(b Mamou, LA, July 31, 1941).

American sculptor and conceptual artist. He grew up in a rural, French-speaking Cajun community. He studied art and anthropology from 1959 at the University of South Western Louisiana, Lafayette (BA, 1963). Sonnier then travelled to England, France, and Italy and studied at the Academy in Paris with André Lhote. He then attended Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (MFA, 1964), studying under Robert Morris and joining the Rutgers Group, an informal association of artists who had developed a type of Minimalism from found materials. Sonnier’s first exhibition was at Douglass College, New Brunswick, in 1966. During the late 1960s he produced wall reliefs and floor-based sculptures in cheesecloth, foam-rubber, and other soft materials. Sonnier consistently used a diversity of materials to evoke cultural, psychological and mystical associations. Neon Wrapping Incandescent Light: Triple Loop (neon and incandescent bulbs, 2400×1325×375 mm, 1969; Sylvia Perlstein priv. col.) is a multi-sensory, highly sensual installation, comprising both visual and auditory elements. Beginning in the 1970s Sonnier made numerous works composed of neon bulbs, plate glass, and mirrors. In the 1990s and 2000s he created neon works for gallery and architectural settings, including ...

Article

Lelia Delgado

(b New York, March 1, 1940).

Venezuelan conceptual and performance artist. She studied psychology at the Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas, and sat in on classes at the Escuela de Artes Plásticas Cristóbal Rojas (now the Escuela de Artes Visuales Cristóbal Rojas) in Caracas, at which she later taught (1983–94). In 1962–6 she studied art at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), graduating with a degree in Plastic Arts (1966). Sosa returned to Venezuela in 1966 and combined her work with investigations into the expressive possibilities of the body. She was a founder-member of the dance group Contradanza (1973–6) and performed in Las cosas que nos pasan in Caracas. From 1970 she was highly active as a teacher of expression through movement and the plastic arts. In her work (examples in Caracas, Mus. B.A. and Ciudad Bolívar, Mus.) she reflected upon the surface and space and on the body as an instrument for the comprehension of such space. Sosa also used the chair as a structure from which to ponder the world, space and the role of the spectator....

Article

(b Newark, NJ, April 10, 1938).

American painter, printmaker, and conceptual artist. She wanted to become an artist from an early age. She studied graphic art at the Pratt Institute, New York (1956–8), and painting and comparative literature at Boston University (1958–60). Steir noted her teachers Richard Lindner and Philip Guston and her studies of Voltaire and Leibniz as highly influential on her work. Her wide visual vocabulary stems from her foundation in graphics and illustration at Pratt. In the early 1960s she worked as a freelance book-cover designer, and as art director at publishers Harper & Row, New York (1965–9), simultaneously pursuing her own painting. Her first mature works were exhibited in solo shows at the Graham Gallery and Paley & Lowe, New York (1972). They are characterized by grids, informalized colour or tonal charts and scales, painterly marks, letters, numbers, signs, and the rendering of such simple motifs as birds, shells, flowers, mountains, and clouds. In the late 1970s Steir was on the board of the feminist magazines ...

Article

Morgan Falconer

(b Worcester, 1949).

English conceptual artist, photograher and collagist. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, London, from 1967 to 1971. Stezaker always worked with the camera, yet his art, emerging out of the conceptual art movement of the 1970s, was shaped more by questions about the politics of representation than the history of photography. His earliest work often employed found popular imagery to examine the construction of stereotypes, and the ways in which the dominant ideology is naturalized through the construction of something designated as ‘reality’. I (1974; see 1979 exh. cat., p. 3) suggests this in its juxtaposition of a car advertisement with a passage from Sigmund Freud. This early use of captions was abandoned in 1976, often in favour of collage: Enter… (Exit)… the Third Person (A Domestic Allegory) (1976; see 1978 exh. cat., pp. 53–5) is typical of the period: its fragments depict an obscure scene involving a woman and a sexually predatory man; large sections of the tableau remain blank, while some of the elements are connected by extended white lines. In the late 1980s Stezaker began to produce large silkscreened images, again with collaged elements. These seemed of a more allegorical cast than his earlier work, combining motifs such as owls, tyres, moons and ships in mysterious juztapositions, often framed by pieces of bark. His work in the 1990s suggested a return to his theoretical interests of the 1970s: ...

Article

Margaret Barlow

(b Los Angeles, CA, Feb 10, 1938).

American conceptual artist, painter and draughtswoman. She studied at the Chouinard Art Institute, Los Angeles (1954–5), at the Instituto de Bellas Artes, Mexico City (1955–6), under Diego Rivera, and at the New School for Social Research, New York (1958–60). Her first exhibition was at Douglass College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (1973). As a child Stuart accompanied her father, an engineer, to survey and map water lines in the deserts of southern California. While working as a topographical draughtswoman and topographer for the Army Corps of Engineers she mapped the earth’s crust from Las Vegas, USA, to Korea. Stuart acknowledged the influence of such experiences on her work, which focuses on a celebration of human culture and its various artefacts, rituals, and monuments, often incorporating the arts of non-Western societies. Her early works took the form of large sculptural scrolls, made of paper impressed with site-specific earth and rocks, for example ...

Article

Morgan Falconer

(b Lakewood, Ohio, 1930; d Paris, May 7, 2014).

American painter, sculptor and conceptual artist. Although notoriously reluctant to reveal biographical details including her date or place of birth, she went on record as having studied at a remarkable number of institutions including the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Art Students’ League in New York, the University of Iowa, the University of Zurich and Columbia University in New York. She quickly rose to notoriety in the late 1960s for her appropriation of famous images by contemporary Pop artists. Her choice of artistic models was carefully made, as the Pop artists had themselves mimicked the appearance of found objects and ready-made images from advertising, commercial art and photography. One of her first such works was a copy of Jasper Johns’s Flag exhibited at a group exhibition in 1965; in 1966 she held a solo exhibition consisting entirely of reproductions of screenprinted paintings from Andy Warhol’s ...

Article

Peter A. Nagy

(b Simla, May 28, 1943).

Indian conceptual and installation artist . Sundaram studied painting (1961–5) at the M.S. University of Baroda, in the western Indian state of Gujarat and at the Slade School in London (1966–8). In 1970 he returned to India and developed a style of figurative painting that became associated with what came to be known as the Baroda School (his peers being Bhupen Khakhar (1934–2003), Gulammohammed Sheikh (b 1937), Nilima Sheikh and Nalini Malani). The Baroda School championed a re-negotiation of figurative painting, employing both narrative devices and art historical quotations. During the 1970s and 1980s, Sundaram’s paintings employed an Impressionistic technique paired with Magic Realist imagery, often alluding to autobiographical events or social situations specific to India ( see fig. ). One notable series of drawings, The Heights of Maacchu Picchu (1972; see Sheikh, p. 174) attempted to address the struggles of the masses through graphic terms. This preoccupation with articulating his own ideological preferences is a recurring leitmotif in his art....

Article

Rex Butler

(b San Remo, Victoria, 1974).

Australian conceptual artist, active also in the USA. Swallow came to prominence only a few years after completing his Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Victorian College of the Arts, Melbourne, by winning the prestigious Contempora 5 art prize in 1999. Swallow could be said to have ushered in a wholly new style in Australian art after the appropriation art of the 1980s and 1990s. His first mature work was a hammerhead shark made out of plaid, later followed by such objects as bicycles and telescopes made out of plastic. These were not hyperreal simulacra in the manner of Pop artist George Segal or sculptor Ron Mueck . Rather, in remaking these objects in altered materials, Swallow wanted to open up a whole series of associations around memory and obsolescence. In one of the works for Contempora 5, Model for a Sunken Monument (1999), Swallow made a vastly scaled-up version of the mask Darth Vader wore in the ...

Article

Terry Smith

(b Sydney, July 30, 1950).

Australian conceptual artist and painter. An architecture student at Sydney University (1969–72), he closely followed the profound questioning of artistic practices concentrated there, including the radical rethinking of Australian and modern art history occurring in the courses and research of the Power Institute of Fine Arts. He was also alert to the particular nexus between minimalist aesthetics and conceptual experimentality being forged by artists in Sydney as elsewhere. A son of Latvian immigrants, he saw these developments from an already displaced perspective. They gave him the grounding for his artistic language, and for his recurrent subject: the imagery of identity, of the personal within the social. It was approached obliquely, usually by inference, often unstable and elusive to the point of disappearance.

The vital paradox of Tillers’s art is the projection of such significant content through the appropriation and quotation of imagery from a number of sources, including reproductions of other artists’ works. His large paintings are assemblies of small canvas-boards, scored by oilstick and arrangeable in various combinations; he even exhibited them in stacks. ...

Article

Reena Jana

(b Buenos Aires, July 21, 1961).

Thai conceptual and installation artist, active also in the USA ( see fig. ). Tiravanija, son of a Thai diplomat, studied at the Ontario College of Art, Toronto and the Banff Center School of Fine Arts, before attending the art school of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Independent Study Program at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Tiravanija’s practice often involves everyday actions and commonplace materials, as well as audience interaction. His first untitled solo show, at 303 Gallery, New York in 1992, consisted of offering visitors Thai food cooked on-site. In 1995 he presented a similar untitled work at the Carnegie International exhibition at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA. At this venue he included wall text that presented written instructions for cooking South-east Asian green curry, which was then prepared for visitors ( see fig. ).

The participatory and performative aspects of Tiravanija’s art, combined with straightforward instructions, recall elements found in work by the Japanese Fluxus artist ...

Article

Jasmina Tumbas

(b Belgrade, Serbia, Sept 2, 1945).

Serbian writer, painter, sculptor, performance, conceptual, and installation artist. Todosijevic studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Belgrade from 1964–69. Along with Marina Abramović, Zoran Popovic (b 1944), Nesa Paripovic (b 1942), Gergelj Urkom (b 1940), and Era Milivojevic (b 1944), Todosijevic was part of the group of six artists active in the 1970s at the Student Cultural Centre (Studentski Kulturni Centar, SKC, opened in 1971) in Belgrade. This alternative art institution became one of the central sites for the New Artistic Practices, a phrase applied to artists who introduced experimental art practices like performance, conceptual, and video art in former Yugoslavia during the 1960s and 1970s. The SKC in Belgrade gained international recognition with its ‘April Meetings for Expanded Media’ (1972–78), where Todosijevic’s work was shown regularly, along with artists like Joseph Beuys and Gina Pane.

Todosijevic’s politically charged oeuvre systematically confronted normative views on art, culture, politics, and social relations, and was influenced by the student protests of ...

Article

Jasmina Tumbas

[Antonio Gotovac Lauer]

(b Sombor, Serbia, Feb 9, 1937; d Zagreb, Croatia, June 24, 2010).

Serbian experimental and documentary filmmaker, performance, body, and conceptual artist. Gotovac was a student at the Faculty of Architecture in Zagreb from 1955–56. From an early age, Gotovac was an autodidactic scholar of film and a habitual visitor of the cinema, carefully studying all the aspects of filmmaking, including sound, structure, and film direction. He began to make his experimental films in 1962, most of which paid homage to popular and avant-garde films, as well as honouring musical virtuosos such as Billie Holiday and Glenn Miller. One of the earliest examples was his structuralist Trilogy from 1964, Straight Line (Stevens – Duke), Circle (Jutkevic – Count), and Blue Rider (Godard – Art). Inspired by Kurt Schwitters’ Merz collages, which Gotovac first saw in 1959 in Zagreb, the artist collected materials for years and began to make collages out of train tickets, product wrappers, magazine advertisements, and the like during 1964 and 1965. In ...

Article

Morgan Falconer

(b Jerusalem, May 18, 1945).

Israeli conceptual artist. He emerged as an artist, in the 1970s, without having had any formal education, addressing disparate concerns germane to conceptual art. The series Five Finger Excercise, begun in 1973, looked at the idea of sameness and uniqueness in art by covering canvases with the artist’s fingerprints. Towards the end of the decade he began to settle on a core of related themes and concerns that continued to preoccupy him. Fascinated by Modernist art’s pursuit of formalism, Toren sought metaphors for the way in which art cannibalizes itself; in so doing he has addressed issues relating to representation in art. In the series Neither a Painting nor a Chair (1979–80; see exh. cat. 1990–91, p. 15) Toren used shavings of wood from a demolished chair as pigment for a series of ten paintings reconstituting the chair as an image. A similar series begun in 1983, Of The Times...

Article

Jasmina Tumbas

(b Sümeg, Hungary, Nov 5, 1937).

Hungarian painter, author of artist books, filmmaker, mail artist, conceptual and action artist, and participant in the Fluxus movement. Tót began his studies at the Hungarian Art Academy in 1958, but was forced out of the program because his artworks diverged from Socialist Realism, which was institutionalized in socialist Hungary at the time. He continued his studies at the Budapest College of Applied Arts from 1959–65, and soon distinguished himself with his informel and abstract expressionist painting style. In the late 1960s Tót began to exhibit with the Hungarian experimental group Iparterv (1968–69). By 1970, he abandoned painting and pronounced that his work had arrived at a ‘ZERO (0)’ point, a concept that signified his deliberate turn towards conceptualism, action, Fluxus, and Correspondence art. ‘Nothing ain’t nothing’, the use of 0s, and a declaration of ‘TÓTalJOYS’ became leitmotifs for his conceptual artworks, poster actions, telegrams, postcards, rubber stamps, T-shirts, and artist books. Tót frequently used a photograph of himself smiling or doing everyday things (standing, walking) in combination with proclamations of joy about such seemingly mundane actions, such as ...

Article

Nina Lübbren

(b Schwerte, Nov 13, 1952).

German conceptual artist. She studied from 1974 to 1978 at the Werkkunstschule, Cologne, which was then heavily influenced by Joseph Beuys. In the early 1980s she came into contact with the Mülheimer Freiheit, a Cologne-based group of painters that included Walter Dahn (b 1954) and Jiří Georg Dokoupil, and she exhibited at the Cologne gallery of Monika Sprüth, who at that time showed only women artists. In 1985 Trockel produced her first ‘knitting pictures’, consisting of lengths of machine-knitted woollen material stretched on to frames. The material is patterned with computer-generated geometrical motifs or recognizable logos, for example the hammer-and-sickle motif of the Soviet Union ironically superimposed on a background of red-and-white stripes that recall the US flag (Untitled, 1986; see 1991–2 exh. cat., pl. 9). The knitted works are ironic comments on the traditionally feminine occupation of knitting placed in a context of mass production. Other works by Trockel also have a feminist theme. A piece consisting of a steel cube fitted with six hot plates in two parallel diagonal lines (...

Article

Tunga  

Adrian Locke

[De Barros Carvalho e Mello Mourão, Antonio José ]

(b Palmares, Pernambuco, Feb 8, 1952; d Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 6, 2016).

Brazilian conceptual artist. He graduated in architecture from the Universidade Santa Ursula, Rio de Janeiro in 1974. In 1976 he co-founded and edited the alternative art journal Malasartes, along with fellow Brazilian artists Cildo Meireles, José Resende (b 1945) and Waltercio Caldas (b 1946); Meireles and Tunga also founded another art journal together, A parte do fogo, in 1980. Tunga produced installation work involving both animate and inanimate objects, and also uses film and video, as in the 1980 Dois irmões (‘Two Brothers’) project and in his collaboration with Arthur Omar, O nervo de prata (‘The Silver Needle’). Large scale and repetition dominate Tunga’s work, which forms an alliance between the natural and the industrial. The result is often the presentation of seemingly desolate industrial landscapes where the initial appearance of sterility is off-set by natural elements that challenge the viewer’s perception. The presence of these organic elements gives life to the industrial forms, forcing the viewer to confront the reality of Brazil’s struggle to marry industrial development with environmental preservation. Huge plates of steel and magnets merge with what appear to be long, thick plaits of hair, a recurrent theme in his work. This hair is often real, attached to the heads of living people or, as in the ...