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J. Lesley Fitton

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Article

D. Evely

Site in eastern Crete on low hills flanking the north–south route across the Ierapetra Isthmus, inhabited c. 3500–c. 1050 bc. First investigated by R. B. Seager (1903–6), it has been substantially reinterpreted by A. Zoïs (from 1970). Although there are traces of Early Minoan (em) i (c. 3500/3000–c. 2900/2600 bc) pottery, the first clear signs of habitation are of early em ii (c. 2900/2600–c. 2200 bc) date. Buildings belonging to several phases had covered the main hilltop by Middle Minoan (mm) ia (c. 2050–c. 1900 bc). The main surviving structures are two buildings of early em ii date and, to their south, two of late em ii. The settlement was destroyed in a great conflagration towards the end of em ii. The southern pair (now the Red/East and West houses) were regarded by Seager as a single ‘House on the Hill’. Zoïs showed that they were separate buildings, which somewhat weakens earlier theories that Vasiliki anticipated features of Minoan palatial architecture (...

Article

Gerald Cadogan

Large Late Minoan i (c. 1560–c. 1425 bc) country house a few kilometres south of Archanes and Knossos in northern central Crete. Excavated by Spyridon Marinatos in 1949–51, it stands on a spur overlooking fertile country, dominated by Mt Juktas to the north-west, with its shrines. The house, which measures over 20×20 m, was apparently not part of a village or hamlet. Its few outbuildings include a kiln, while in the house itself are presses for olive oil and wine. Its architecture exemplifies the high quality of building of these large villas, which probably controlled large estates. Features include ashlar masonry, column bases of different stones, pillar basements, recesses for windows and a paved west court. On the east side of the building, opposite the entrance and across a small courtyard, is a tripartite shrine, with a central recess (possibly for a seat or statue) between two square masonry structures with hollow centres. These may have held flagstaff-like masts, as depicted on the peak-sanctuary chlorite and gold rhyton from ...

Article

D. Evely

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D. Evely

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D. Evely

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Louise Schofield, C. D. Fortenberry, Stefan Hiller, O. T. P. K. Dickinson, Lyvia Morgan, D. Evely, Reynold Higgins, Margaret A. V. Gill and Susan Sherratt

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Reynold Higgins

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Margaret A. V. Gill

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Margaret A. V. Gill

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P. M. Warren

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O. T. P. K. Dickinson

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D. Evely

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Susan Sherratt

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Susan Sherratt

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Susan Langdon

[now Ayios Vasilios]

Site of an Early and Late Bronze Age town in the Corinthia of southern Greece, midway between Argos and Corinth. Excavations at the Zygouries Hill in the Kleonai Valley were conducted by Carl Blegen in 1921–2 for the American School of Classical Studies, revealing an important sequence of Bronze Age settlements. The Early Helladic (eh) phase (c. 3600/3000–c. 2050 bc) was the most abundantly represented, with at least ten houses of mud-brick on stone socle construction arranged close together on narrow streets. The rectangular, flat-roofed, two- and three-roomed structures with fixed central hearths provided one of the first definitive examples of Early Bronze Age domestic architecture. Contemporary graves yielded a broad variety of eh pottery, small gold, silver and bronze ornaments, numerous figurines and stone tools. Like its neighbours Tiryns, Asine, Lerna and Ayios Kosmas, Zygouries suffered a severe destruction at the end of ...