61-80 of 403 results  for:

Clear all

Article

David Alexander

[Antoine]

(b Brussels, May 15, 1772; d London, April 16, 1813).

Flemish engraver and print publisher, active in London. The son of Antoine Alexandre Joseph Cardon (1739–1822), a painter and engraver in Brussels, he was persuaded by the troubled times to go to London in 1792. He entered the Royal Academy Schools on 3 November 1792 and was engaged by Paul Colnaghi to engrave, under the direction of Luigi Schiavonetti, three of the Cries of London after Francis Wheatley in 1794–6. Cardon was an enterprising man, soon establishing himself as an independent publisher. He took advantage of the peace of 1801, in that year engraving and publishing in Paris and London Joseph Boze’s painting of The First Consul and General Berthier at the Battle of Marengo (untraced) jointly with the painter. He was known to Joseph Farington, who noted some of his activities, such as his purchase of two paintings by Philippe Jacques de Loutherbourg for engraving (4 March 1805...

Article

Véronique Meyer

(b Lyon, May 28, 1699; d Paris, April 14, 1771).

French printmaker, print publisher and print-seller. Early in his life his family removed to Paris. His father, Jean-François Cars (1661–1730), an engraver and publisher, was his first teacher. He next studied painting under Joseph Christophe (1662–1748) and François Lemoyne and then completed his studies in engraving under Nicolas-Henry Tardieu. In 1729 he was approved (agréé) by the Académie Royale and on 31 December 1733 was received (reçu), on presentation of the engraved portraits of Michel Anguier after Gabriel Revel and of Sébastien Bourdon after Hyacinthe Rigaud. From 1750 he gradually abandoned engraving in favour of print-selling, particularly those of his father’s collection. In 1757 he was appointed a Conseiller. His work included nearly 190 prints; he engraved portraits, historical and mythological subjects after Lemoyne, such as Hercules and Omphale and the Bath of Iris, and genre subjects after Watteau, such as Figures de différents caractères...

Article

(b Nashville, TN, Nov 30, 1945).

American graphic designer. Carson studied fine art and art history at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, graduating in 1966. She started her career as a graphic designer in 1967 working for United Methodist Publishing House, Nashville, TN, designing magazines and educational materials. Working with limited budgets and for readers ranging from children in kindergarten to adults, she learnt to communicate with varying age groups. Drawing on her magazine design skills, she began work for Color Productions in 1968. Producing international magazines gave her exposure to the full-spectrum of design production, illustration, and final press production. When the company resources diminished in 1970, Carson took a position at Design Graphics, a Nashville art studio.

In 1973 she landed a job at Scholastic Publishing House designing their early childhood magazine Let’s Find Out. Teaming up with editor Jean Marzollo, she worked with nationally known illustrators and photographers to make the children’s stories and educational material easy for children to relate to. This partnership lasted far beyond her tenure there, leading to collaboration on the ...

Article

Françoise Jestaz

(b Viterbo; fl 1560; d Naples, April 16, 1620).

Italian printmaker and cartographer. He was in Rome by 1560, the date of his first known engraving, the Adoration of the Shepherds (b. 2), after Heinrich Aldegrever. Bartsch recorded 28 prints by him, to which Passavant added a further 27. Mainly engravings, his works include St Jerome (b. 14), after Albrecht Dürer, Christ Descending into Limbo (b. 7), after Andrea Mantegna, the Last Judgement (b. 18), after Michelangelo, and a Landscape (b. 26), after Titian. Until 1577 Cartaro collaborated with the publisher Antoine Lafréry, providing illustrations for the Speculum Romanae magnificentiae, a collection of plans and views issued between 1545 and 1577, and for Le tavole moderne di geografia (c. 1580). After this, he turned increasingly to the more profitable activity of print-selling. He spent his last years in Naples making drawings for printed maps of the kingdom of Naples (e.g. b. 27) with the help of the mathematician ...

Article

Ingrid Severin

(b Görlitz, Feb 21, 1871; d Berlin, Jan 7, 1926).

German dealer, publisher and journalist. After studying art history at the University of Munich, where he was co-editor of Simplicissimus from 1896 to 1898, he established himself in 1898 as a publisher and dealer in Berlin, helping contemporary artists towards international recognition. In 1908 he founded Verlag Paul Cassirer, a firm that published belles-lettres, especially Expressionist literature, and that promoted such artists as Ernst Barlach. In 1910 he married Ottilie Godefroy, who wrote her memoirs many years later under her stage name of Tilla Durieux.

Cassirer founded the Pan-Presse in 1909, edited the bi-monthly Pan in 1910 and in 1913 founded the journal Die Weissen Blätter, containing comment on literature and art, which he published until 1921. Already President of the Berlin Secession, in 1913 he founded the Freie Sezession, whose exhibitions he planned. In the years preceding World War I Cassirer became a friend of Paul Durand-Ruel and promoted the work of the ...

Article

Term for a ‘popular’ print particularly associated with the successful London Broadside printer and publisher James Catnach (1792–1841) and his rival John Pitts (1765–1844), who exploited the innovations of wood-engraving and robust cast-iron printing presses. Between 1820 and 1850 the production of cheap printed material was particularly vigorous in England. The prints produced, particularly those depicting famous gory murders, were churned out in enormous numbers, sometimes in excess of 1 million. The printers tended to have very large collections of blocks, and Catnach often bought up old printers’ stock at auctions and recycled them. Catnach and Pitts were both opportunists, who apparently did not hesitate to print fake narratives on broadsides if there was a dull period with little news; ‘catchpenny’ is thus also a general term for a deceptive or hasty literary work got up for mere profit.

C. Hindley: Curiosities of Street Literature: Comprising ‘cocks’, or ‘catchpennies’, a Large and Curious Assortment of Street-drolleries, Squibs, Histories, Comic Tales in Prose and Verse...

Article

(b Villa Lagarina, nr Trento, c. 1525; d Rome, July 23, 1601).

Italian engraver, publisher and draughtsman. Active from 1559 in Rome, his repertories of engravings reflect the antiquarian interests of his patrons, high clergy of the Counter-Reformation Church. The Antiquarum statuarum urbis Romae provides the first systematic publication of engravings of antique statues in public and private, mostly clerical, collections in Rome. Printed between c. 1560 and 1594 in a series of small editions, its number of plates increased from 58 to 200. The representations of the statues are accurate, showing the degree of restoration. Latin captions give their names and locations, which in later editions reflect changes of address. Cavalieri’s plates were also reprinted in the 17th century. Ashby described each standard edition by Cavalieri and his followers and tabled the plates of the various editions, including captions and present locations of the statues. Many extant copies vary from the standard editions, as customers chose loose plates to bind with a title-page (Gerlach, ...

Article

Ismeth Raheem

(b 1854; d England, 1913).

English photographer, publisher and writer. He first travelled to Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) as private secretary to the Bishop of Colombo. In 1870 he set up a small bookshop in Colombo, which by 1884 had diversified into a flourishing publishing house, H. W. Cave & Company, and a printing firm equipped to produce books with excellent quality photographic reproductions. He took a serious interest in photography, and this enabled him to illustrate the pictorial travelogues written by him and published by his own firm. His close supervision of the details of book production and photographic reproduction gave him a competitive edge over other commercial photographers. He returned to England in 1886 after the death of his wife and settled down in Oxford. He made occasional visits to Ceylon, but continued to manage his firm’s business from England.

In his photography Cave specialized in rural and landscape scenes and was especially interested in creating views with luxuriant tropical vegetation, using dramatic atmospheric lighting effects. Some of the best examples of this type of work are reproduced in his lavishly printed travelogues ...

Article

Laura Suffield

(b Kent, ?1427; d London, 1492).

English printer, publisher, translator, and merchant. In 1437–8 he entered the London Mercers’ Company, apprenticed to wool merchant Robert Large after whose death (1441) he moved to Bruges, where he established a position of considerable prestige in the English trading community; in 1462 he became governor of the settlement of English merchants in Bruges known as the English Nation and subsequently entered the service of Margaret of York, Duchess of Burgundy. Several documents refer to Caxton’s diplomatic activities. In 1469 he began a translation of Raoul Le Fèvres’s Recueil des histoires de Troye, which he completed in 1471 in Cologne, where he also learnt the trade and art of printing; however, his first books were probably printed in Bruges, to which he returned probably in early 1473. On his return to England he set up the first printing press in the country in the precincts of Westminster Abbey. His earliest dated London work is an ecclesiastical indulgence dated ...

Article

Francesco Paolo Fiore

(b 1476–8; d Milan, 1543).

Italian architect, theorist and painter. He was active mainly in Milan and is famous for publishing the first Italian translation, with commentary and illustrations, of Vitruvius (1521). The brief autobiography that this contains is also the principal source of information regarding Cesariano’s own life, education and aims.

Cesariano’s date of birth has been disputed, but it is now thought to be 1476–8, following the documentation from the time of his father’s death in 1482. In 1482 Cesariano was introduced to the court of Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan, where he came into contact with courtiers and artists and met Bramante, whom he named as his chief teacher. He doubtless observed the preparatory phases and building of S Maria presso S Satiro, the only work by Bramante in Milan to which he refers specifically in his commentary on Vitruvius. He could not have followed Bramante’s subsequent career, for he was forced to leave his home town ...

Article

(John)

(b London, c. 1819; d c. 1883).

English mezzotint engraver. He was a prolific engraver in London and was employed by most of the leading publishers and dealers. He specialized in large-scale portrait, historical and genre prints engraved after a wide variety of contemporary artists and 18th-century portrait painters including Joshua Reynolds. He first exhibited at the Royal Academy in ...

Article

Christopher Masters

French family of publishers. Gervais Charpentier (d 14 July 1871) introduced to France a new format for books that allowed more words to be printed on the page, thereby making books much less expensive to produce. Although the format was originally called in-18 anglais, it was soon known in France as the format Charpentier. Charpentier’s publishing house produced, among other things, beautiful illustrated books, including Théophile Gautier’s Capitaine Fracasse (1863), with illustrations by Gustave Doré, and an edition of the works of Alfred de Musset illustrated by Alexandre Bida (1813–95). These achievements were continued by Gervais’s son Georges Charpentier (b Paris, 1846; d 1905). As well as publishing important novels by French Realist writers, Georges was responsible for such editions as Quatrelle’s A coups de fusil illustrated by Alphonse de Neuville. Georges Charpentier was awarded the Légion d’Honneur in 1886.

Dictionnaire universel des contemporains...

Article

Marianne Grivel

(fl 1558–74).

French painter, draughtsman, print publisher and possibly engraver. He was a painter working in Orléans and published about 20 prints, dated between 1558 and 1574, which he may have engraved himself. He may have gained his knowledge of the art of the School of Fontainebleau from Jacques Androuet du Cerceau (i), who was at one point established in Orléans. It is possible, however, that he worked at the château of Fontainebleau, since his engraving the Masquerade of Persepolis is an interpretation of a painting by Francesco Primaticcio in the chamber of the Duchesse d’Etampes there. Chartier also published and possibly engraved the same artist’s Ulysses Recognized by his Dog, the 34th picture in the Galerie d’Ulysse at Fontainebleau. Original prints by him, such as Blazons of Virtue and the Naked Man Walking on Hot Coals, are typical of the style of Fontainebleau and representative of provincial French Mannerism in their almost excessive and somewhat angular refinement....

Article

Philippe Kaenel

(b Sens, Yonne, May 11, 1807; d Versailles, Feb 27, 1890).

French journalist and politician. He was the son of a smallholder. He studied law in Paris (1824–7) and then worked for several philanthropic societies, before being appointed editor (1829) of the Bulletin de la Société pour l’instruction élémentaire. The following year he joined the Saint-Simonistes (a militant movement for social equality), leaving in 1831 to take up a post in the Ministry of Public Works. In 1833 he founded, with Euryale Cazeaux, the first popular illustrated weekly in France: the Magasin pittoresque. In 1843 he participated in founding L’Illustration, the first major illustrated daily newspaper in France. During this period he was also pursuing a political career as a moderate republican. He served as Député for the Yonne in the Assemblée Nationale and in 1848 became Secretary-General of the Ministry of Education, but under the Second Empire (1852–70) he withdrew from politics.

During the 1850s and 1860s Charton produced books of travel, such as ...

Article

Maxime Préaud

(b Orléans, bapt April 18, 1635; d Paris, Sept 15, 1683).

French engraver and print publisher. He travelled to Rome, where he trained as an engraver with Johann Friedrich Greuter (c. 1590/93–1662) and Cornelis Bloemaert the younger. He then worked for a time for the Papacy and stayed in Venice and Genoa before returning to France. He taught engraving in Lyon to Benoît Farjat (1646–c. 1720). Having moved to Paris, he became known for his engravings after works by Poussin, such as the Death of Germanicus (1663; see Weigert, no. 35). He worked for Louis XIV and in 1663 became one of the first engravers to be admitted to the Académie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture. In 1665 he married the miniaturist Antoinette Hérault (1642–95), thus becoming brother-in-law to the painters Charles-Antoine Hérault (1644–1718) and Noël Coypel. Chasteau went into partnership with the latter in the publication of thesis frontispieces, Coypel supplying the drawings and Chasteau carrying out the engraving and distribution. Without abandoning engraving, he actively engaged himself in the publishing and selling of prints, as is shown by the inventory made after his death; he set up business in the Rue St Jacques, first under the sign of the Guardian Angel and then under that of the Bust of Louis XIV. He exhibited at the Académie Royale in ...

Article

Celia Carrington Riely

[Ch’en Chi-ju; zi Zhongshun; hao Meigong, Meidaoren, Migong]

(b Huating, Jiangsu Province [modern Songjiang, Shanghai Municipality], 16 Dec 1558; d 19 Oct 1639). Chinese editor, writer, calligrapher and painter. He exemplified the literati ideal of the accomplished gentleman–scholar who rejected the sordid world of political involvement and devoted himself to a life of literary, artistic and philosophical pursuit. At the age of 28, having passed the prefectural examination, the first important step leading to a career in government office, Chen renounced official life in a dramatic gesture, by burning his Confucian cap and gown. Thereafter he lived at country retreats at Kunshan and then Mt She, near Huating in Jiangsu Province: entertaining guests; writing and editing; composing the poems, prefaces, epitaphs and biographies for which he was in constant demand; and travelling to places of scenic beauty in the company of friends.

Chen followed the lead of his close friend Dong Qichang, the foremost painter, calligrapher and connoisseur of the late Ming period (...

Article

Véronique Meyer

(b Blois, March 20, 1680; d Paris, April 15, 1729).

French engraver, print publisher and print-seller. He was the son of a joiner and was trained in Girard Audran’s workshop in Paris. In 1715 he was accepted (agréé) by the Académie Royale and was received (reçu) in 1718 with his engraving after a Self-portrait by Louis Boullogne (i) (Roux, no. 28). In that same year he bought Girard Audran’s business, called Les Deux Piliers d’Or, from his widow, and with it part of its stock of plates. He published chiefly high-quality prints and was one of the first to be interested in engravings after Watteau. He was esteemed as an engraver, even though his oeuvre comprises only 56 finished plates. Although Chéreau engraved some paintings on sacred subjects after such artists as Domenichino, Guido Reni (Crucifixion, r 4) and Raphael (St John the Baptist in the Wilderness, r 2, for the Recueil Crozat), he chiefly engraved portraits, a genre in which, according to Pierre-Jean Mariette, only the Drevet family could rival him. Most of the portraits are engraved after ...

Article

(b Antwerp, c. 1560; d Antwerp, June 29, 1618).

Flemish draughtsman, engraver, print publisher and dealer. He was probably trained by the engraver and publisher Philip Galle, whose daughter Justa (d 1616) he married in 1586, and with whom he collaborated. In 1580 Adriaen was admitted to the Antwerp Guild of St Luke as a master’s son; in 1596 and 1597 he was respectively assistant dean and dean. Collaert produced a notable and extensive oeuvre of c. 600 engravings, including various series after his own drawings of birds, fish and animals (e.g. Animalium quadrupedum, Hollstein, nos 596–615; and Avium vivae icones, 1580; Hollstein, nos 616–47). Also after his own designs are the series of engravings of the Four Elements (pubd by himself; Hollstein, nos 453–6) and Flowers (pubd by Theodoor Galle; Hollstein, nos 679–702). All these rather uneven compositions are characterized by the faithful representation of nature. Collaert’s own compositions often include decorative borders consisting of flowers, animals and grotesques. This suggests he was important as a designer of ornament. However, by far the majority of his work comprises engravings after other Netherlandish artists, including ...

Article

Jacques Kuhnmünch

(b ?Nancy, c. 1610; d Rome, bur Jan 18, 1687).

French engraver, print-seller and publisher, active in Italy. After a four-year apprenticeship sometime between 1622 and 1630 in the studio of Jacques Callot, he went to Rome to finish his training as an engraver. Collignon is chiefly known as a print-seller and publisher, however. After a modest start in Paris, he settled in the Parione district of Rome. Details of his estate, posthumously published, reveal that he was a major figure in publishing and print-selling. Sometime after 1650 he and Giovanni Giacomo Rossi were the joint publishers of Pietro Testa’s engravings, and Collignon also published plates by Cornelis Bloemaert (ii) after Pietro da Cortona, Nicolas Poussin and Charles Le Brun. He also handled engravings by Simon Vouet and François Spierre as well as large numbers of prints by Nicolas Pérelle and Jean Le Pautre. On Collignon’s death, his business was bought up by the Antwerp dealer Arnold van Westerhout (...

Article

Pat Gilmour

[Fr. phototypie; Ger. Lichtdruck]

First viable commercial printing process capable of translating the continuous tones of photography into the permanency of printer’s ink. Patented in 1855 by the Frenchman Alphonse Louis Poitevin, the technique involved printing from a surface of photosensitized gelatin, hence its English name (from Gr. kolla: ‘glue’). During the 19th century collotype was called by a bewildering variety of names: some, such as ‘Photopane’, ‘Hoeschotype’ and ‘Autotype Mechanical Process’, deriving from the names of individuals or companies who adopted it and others, such as ‘photogelatine process’, referring to its technical features. ‘Ink photos’, made by transferring to lithographic stone an image developed as a coarse collotype grain on gelatin, were used in the 1880s before relief half-tones were possible.

Modern collotypes are made by pouring a solution of gelatin and potassium bichromate over a sheet of plate-glass. When dry, the plate is placed in contact with a continuous tone negative and exposed to light. Where the light shines through the negative and strikes the sensitized gelatin, the coating hardens in such a way that it later rejects moisture but accepts printing ...