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Isabelle Gournay

( Louis )

(b Angers, Oct 20, 1911; d 1996).

French architect . He studied architecture at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris (1928–39), winning the Premier Grand Prix de Rome in 1939. In 1942 he went to Tunisia as a volunteer in the Free French Army. From 1943 to 1948 he practised there as Chief Government Architect, directing a team involved in modernization; they designed housing projects, markets and schools, which were notable for their respect of local traditions. Although he returned to private practice in Paris (1948), he still received large public commissions from the Tunisian government (for example buildings for the University of Tunis, 1960–64). In Paris he was instrumental in the implementation of the Camus process, a prefabrication method that he used in the housing complex at the Pont de Sèvres, Boulogne-Billancourt (1949–52). The Renault industrial complex, Flins (1950–55), is in a straightforward International style, although its façades are enlivened by a polychrome composition by the painter ...

Article

Diane Harris

( fl mid-1st century ad ).

Greek bronze sculptor, active in Rome and Gaul . His name (‘foreign gift’) suggests that he may have been born in Massalia (Marseille), Asia Minor, Egypt or Syria, and according to Pliny (Natural History XXXIV.xviii.46) he was the foremost sculptor of colossal statues of the 1st century ad. From ad 54 to 64 Zenodoros worked in Arvernis, Gaul, making a bronze statue of Mercury, for which he was paid 40 million sesterces. Nero commissioned him to make a colossal imperial portrait c. 36 m high, which was placed in his palace, the Domus Aurea in Rome (Pliny: XXXIV.xviii.45–6; Suetonius: Nero xxxi). During the reign of Vespasian ( ad 69–79) it was converted into a statue of the Sun god, Sol (Aelius Spartianicus: Hadrian XIX.xii; Herodian: I.xv.9; Pliny: XXXIV.xviii.45). A replica of the Mercury was known in Corinth in antiquity (Pausanias: Guide to Greece II.iii.4) and several extant copies may reflect the original appearance of the statue. The colossal statue of ...

Article

D. Walker and Celia Winter-Irving

[formerly Southern Rhodesia , Rhodesia ]

Country of c. 390,580 sq. km in Southern Africa, bordered by Zambia to the west and north, by Mozambique to the north and east, by South Africa to the south, and by Botswana to the south and west. The capital is Harare (formerly Salisbury). Zimbabwe’s fertile plateau and mountain ranges contain vast mineral resources including serpentines and such other stones in many colours as verdite and soapstone. Its population of c. 10,600,000 (census, 1992) comprises mostly Shona-speaking peoples (c. 75%), with the Nguni-speaking Ndebele making up the largest non-Shona group. The area of present-day Zimbabwe was first settled by the San in c. 20,000 bc. Around 500 bc Shona agriculturalists and herdsmen moved into the country and by ad 1000 had built up a commercial empire based around Great Zimbabwe . In the early 19th century a king of the Ndebele, Mzilikazi, conquered the country. In 1890 an army sent by Cecil Rhodes (the British Prime Minister of the Cape Colony) invaded, and by ...

Article

S. J. Vernoit

Muslim dynasty that ruled in parts of North Africa and Spain between ad 972 and 1152. The founder of the dynasty, Ziri ibn Manad (d 972), was a Sanhaja Berber in the service of the Fatimid caliphs, who ruled from Tunisia. In 936 Ziri founded Ashir, the family seat, in the Titeri Mountains 170 km south of Algiers. His son Buluggin (reg 972–84) was appointed governor of North Africa when the Fatimids left Kairouan for Cairo. Under Buluggin, his son al-Mansur (reg 984–96), and his grandson Badis (reg 996–1016), the Zirids greatly enlarged their territory, expanding into northern Morocco, where they came in conflict with the Umayyads of Spain. By 1015 the Zirid domain had become too large to be governed from Kairouan alone: the Zirids retained control of the eastern half, while the western portion was granted to Buluggin’s son Hammad (reg 1015–28), who established his capital at the Qal‛at Bani Hammad to the east of Ashir. In ...

Article

Zulu  

Sandra Klopper

Originally a minor northern Nguni group living along the middle reaches of the White Umfolozi River in South Africa. Use of the name Zulu was extended after Shaka Senzangakhona Zulu (c. 1787–1828) conquered other northern Nguni polities, thereby establishing a formidable militarist state in south-east Africa, stretching from the Pongola River in the north of present-day Natal to the Thukela River in the south; from the mid-1840s it shared its southern boundary with the Colony of Natal. To the north Shaka established tributary relations with Tsonga chiefdoms on the eastern seaboard and, to a lesser extent, with the Swazi kingdom further inland. The kingdom was destroyed by British forces in 1879.

Although they became relatively culturally distinct from one another in the late 18th century and early 19th, the Tsonga of southern Mozambique, the Ngwane (later the Swazi ruling lineage) and the northern Nguni chiefdoms of Zululand-Natal shared many ritual practices. While the Zulu have always produced a variety of utilitarian artefacts and elaborate dress for ritual and other occasions, there have been significant changes in the style, function and symbolic value they attribute to their craft objects and clothing. Indeed some artefacts, once highly valued, are no longer produced. Many factors account for these developments, in particular shifting patterns in the control and distribution of imported materials, especially during the 19th century, the expropriation by European settlers of large areas of fertile land, and the consequent disruptive effects of migrant labour on traditional Zulu life. Zulu arts have been quite widely illustrated (see bibliography) and many museums with African collections have examples of Zulu arts....

Article

David Koloane

(b Ixopo, Jan 1, 1960).

South African mixed-media artist. He obtained his BA in Fine Arts from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. In 1995 he was invited to Reunion Island to create a work as part of a project to engage artists from around the Indian Ocean: Seven Artists, Seven Countries. He exhibited in Trade Routes: History and Geography, the Second Johannesburg Biennale, in 1997, and that same year was a member of the Amakhona Art Centre. Zulu is one of the few black artists who have departed from the trodden path of paint and brushes. In place of a brush he uses a blowtorch, and instead of paint, fire and smoke, which he controls on a blank canvas to delineate form and image; for him, beauty is in form, not content. His pieces depict struggle and make reference to history, religion, art and politics. He works in patterns and metaphors, with pyrotechnic effects. The ashes and charred surfaces are references to oppressive social conditions experienced by South African blacks, with fire symbolism, for example, suggesting the scorched earth policies employed by warring factions in different areas of the country. His fire remains under control, however, though society sometimes seems out of control. His environmental installations comprise scorched roots, grasses and bulbs that also suggest healing qualities inherent in nature and tradition....