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Article

Jaynie Anderson

(b Dresden, Jan 7, 1847; d Lugano, Aug 25, 1937).

German art historian, collector and dealer. The son of a Lutheran clergyman, he first studied theology at Leipzig but while travelling in Italy in 1869 became interested in early Christian archaeology, in which field he determined to continue. His first publications were on the sources of Byzantine art history and the mosaics of Ravenna. In 1876 he met Giovanni Morelli, whose disciple he became. Their lengthy correspondence constitutes an important source for the early history of connoisseurship. Richter published a short biography of Leonardo in 1880, then a series of articles in the Zeitschrift für bildende Kunst and finally his edition of the Literary Works of Leonardo (1883), the work that established his reputation as a scholar. This was the first scholarly edition of Leonardo’s writings, illustrated, moreover, with a selection of mostly authentic drawings at a time when books on Leonardo were normally illustrated by his pupils’ works....

Article

Malcolm Gee

(b Copenhagen, Aug 11, 1861; d Copenhagen, Jan 25, 1932).

Danish collector, engineer and politician. Together with Christian Tetzen-Lund he was the foremost Danish collector of contemporary art of his time, playing a central role in bringing the achievements of modern French painters to the attention of the Danish public. He trained as an engineer specializing in sanitation and set up a successful business in Copenhagen in the 1890s. He then followed his father into politics, becoming a respected figure in the Social Democratic Party. His early interest in art was stimulated by meeting the collector Carl Jacobsen (1842–1916), and he began collecting drawings and Danish paintings. After visiting Paris in 1912 he became increasingly interested in contemporary French art and began amassing a large collection centred around the work of André Derain, Henri Matisse and Maurice Utrillo, sometimes reselling works in the process. He did not appreciate either Cubism or later avant-garde developments. He served as a trustee for Danish museums and in ...

Article

Hans-Olof Boström

(Fredrik)

(b Malmö, Sept 13, 1835; d Malmö, Oct 11, 1933).

Swedish painter. He lodged with and was a pupil of the Danish landscape painter Frederik Christian Kiærskou (1805–91), and at the same time he studied at the Kunstakademi in Copenhagen (1852–5). In 1857 he moved to the Akademi för de Fria Konsterna in Stockholm. Like several other Swedish artists of his generation he studied at the Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf (1859–64). His teacher there was the Norwegian Hans Gude, who was professor of landscape painting and whose strong influence can be seen in several landscapes including Swedish Landscape (1863; Göteborg, Kstmus.), which was painted in Düsseldorf. Rydberg lived in various parts of Sweden, chiefly in Stockholm, and he settled permanently in his native province of Skåne in 1897. His early landscapes were Romantic, in the Düsseldorf tradition, but in about 1870 he became one of the first plein-air painters of Sweden. He has been called ‘the artistic discoverer of Skåne’, for his impressive depictions of the lowland expanses of Skåne with their wide skies. He preferred simple themes, as in ...

Article

Santos  

James Cordova and Claire Farago

Term that refers to handmade paintings and sculptures of Christian holy figures, crafted by artists from the Hispanic and Lusophone Americas. The term first came into widespread use in early 20th-century New Mexico among English-speaking art collectors to convey a sense of cultural authenticity. Throughout the Americas, the term imagenes occurs most frequently in Spanish historical documents. Santos are usually painted on wood panels (retablos) or carved and painted in the round (bultos). Reredos, or altarpieces, often combine multiple retablos and bultos within a multi-level architectural framework.

European Christian imagery was circulated widely through the Spanish viceroyalties in the form of paintings, sculptures, and prints, the majority of which were produced in metropolitan centres such as Mexico City, Antigua, Lima, and Puebla, where European- and American-born artists established guilds and workshops. These became important sources upon which local artists elsewhere based their own traditions of religious image-making using locally available materials such as buffalo hides, vegetal dyes, mineral pigments, and yucca fibres, commonly employed by native artists long before European contact....

Article

Elisheva Revel-Neher

(b Budapest, 1927; d Paris, 2008).

Art historian and scholar of Jewish and Christian art, active in France. Known as the ‘grande dame’ of Jewish art, Sed-Rajna came to Paris in 1948. She became Director of the Hebraic Section of the Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) and then taught at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes and at the Institut d’Etudes Juives of the Université Libre in Brussels. In 1976 she founded with Bezalel Narkiss the Jerusalem Index of Jewish Art and became President of the European Association for Jewish Studies. She published six pioneering books and numerous articles, scrutinizing the role played by the artistic heritage of the Jewish people.

In all her works the visual expression of the Jewish tradition was envisioned in the larger framework of the history of arts. Her immense knowledge of both texts and images led her to publish in ...

Article

Ingrid Reed Thomsen

(b Modum, March 12, 1854; d Eggedal, Jan 19, 1924).

Norwegian painter and writer. After a year at Johan Fredrik Eckersberg’s painting school and the Royal School of Drawing and Art in Christiania (now Oslo), Skredsvig studied in Copenhagen (1870–74), first as a pupil of Vilhelm Kyhn and later at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. Besides landscapes, his main interest was animal painting. In 1874–5 he studied in Paris, in museums and with Léon Bonnat. From 1875 to 1879 he worked in Munich, where among others he was influenced by Arnold Böcklin. Skredsvig painted landscapes based on sketches made in Norway but using German models, as in Evening in the Mountains (1878, priv. col.; replica, 1882, Bergen, Billedgal.), a typical studio work in its smooth finish and use of local colour.

Returning to Paris in 1879 Skredsvig again studied briefly under Bonnat and others. Works from this period such as Unloading Snow by the Seine (...

Article

Tone Skedsmo

(b Christiania [Kristiania from 1877; now Oslo], Nov 29, 1869; d Oslo, June 19, 1935).

Norwegian painter and printmaker. Sohlberg decided to be a painter when young, but his father wished him to follow a thorough training as a craftsman. Sohlberg therefore enrolled at the Royal School of Drawing in Kristiania in 1885 under the interior designer Wilhelm Krogh (1829–1913) and stayed at the school until 1890. Subsequently, he attended night classes under the graphic artist and painter Johan Nordhagen (1856–1956) both in the autumn of 1906 and also from 1911 to 1917, when he concentrated on printmaking. Sohlberg painted his first pictures while staying in the Valdrés region to the north-west of Kristiania in summer 1889. The following summer he painted with Sven Jørgensen (1861–1940) at Slagen near Åsgårdstrand, and in autumn 1891 he was a pupil of Erik Werenskiold and Eilif Peterssen in Kristiania. For some months during the winter of 1891–2 Sohlberg attended Kristian Zahrtmann’s art school in Copenhagen. He also studied for four months in ...

Article

(b Spetsai, Sept 20, 1888; d Athens, Jan 25, 1963).

Greek archaeologist and art historian. Although he originally studied theology, Soteriou devoted his life to Early Christian and Byzantine archaeology, which he studied at the universities of Leipzig, Berlin and Vienna from 1909. He was appointed Inspector General of Byzantine Antiquities at Athens in 1915 and Director of the Byzantine Museum at Athens in 1923. Under his leadership the museum grew into an international centre of Byzantine architectural and archaeological studies.

From 1928 to 1951 he was Professor of Christian archaeology and palaeography at the National Capodistrian University of Athens. He was elected to membership of the Athens Academy in 1926 and held its presidency in 1941; he was also a member of many learned societies both in Greece and abroad. In 1957 he was presented with the prestigious Grand Prix G. Schlumberger for Byzantine studies by the Académie Française.

Soteriou brought to light many previously little- or unknown monuments, as in his excavations (...

Article

Sabine Kehl-Baierle

(b Vienna, July 11, 1875; d Klosterneuburg, nr Vienna, Aug 24, 1959).

Austrian painter. He studied painting from 1890 to 1899 at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna under Christian Griepenkerl (1839–1916), Rudolf Carl Huber (1839–96) and August Eisenmenger (1830–1907). He produced the triptych Faith, Hope and Charity (1899; Giesshübl Church, nr Mödling, Lower Austria). In 1899–1900 he travelled in Italy on a Kenyon scholarship. He volunteered to fight with the Boers in South Africa; having contracted malaria he travelled on to Zanzibar via Madagascar. After a short stay in Bombay he returned to Vienna, where he exhibited studies from his long journey at the Galerie Miethke in 1902 (e.g. portrait of the Sultan of Zanzibar Tipotip, Vienna, Mus. Vlkerknd.). Between 1905 and 1935 (except during World War I), he was a teacher of free-hand drawing at a secondary school in Klosterneuburg. In 1905–6 one of his pupils was Egon Schiele, whose talent he fostered, taking him on outdoor painting trips and introducing him to oil painting. Many of Schiele’s very early works were preserved by Strauch (Vienna, Niederösterreich. Landesmus., on long-term loan in Tulln, Egon Schiele Mus.); several drawings show Strauch working at his easel. Landscapes and genre scenes from his immediate surroundings form the subject-matter of Strauch’s paintings, as in ...

Article

Lori van Biervliet

(b London, March 8, 1832; d London, April 26, 1917).

English art historian. He was educated at King’s College, London, from 1842 to 1848. From an early age he was interested in medieval Christianity, and in February 1849 he converted to Roman Catholicism. He had a lifelong interest in Christian symbolism and iconography and, above all, liturgy. Another early interest was in Belgian churches (he had visited every parish church by the age of 19) and memorial tablets. In 1855 he moved to Bruges, where his antiquarian interests led him to undertake work in the restoration and preservation of ancient monuments. In 1863 he launched Le Beffroi, a periodical concerned with the conservation of monuments and historic buildings, the study of medieval art and the promotion of the Neo-Gothic style. In this, and in La Flandre (a magazine published on Weale’s initiative in 1867), he published much of the information he discovered while researching the city’s archives. He also established the ...

Article

Rigmor Lovring

(b Christianshavn, Nov 18, 1879; d Copenhagen, April 9, 1943).

Danish painter . He was self-taught, except for a short period of study under Kristian Zahrtmann at the Kunstnernes Studieskoler, Copenhagen (1906–7). On his first journey abroad to Italy in 1907 he was impressed by the Mediterranean light, which influenced his later desire to introduce lighter colours into his painting. His maturation as an artist, however, took place in Denmark. His first paintings were naturalistic, with a colour scale close to grey. He described this early work as realistic–impressionistic, with a rhythmical weighing out of form and colouring, the chief emphasis being laid on the colouring, as in the Painter’s Mother (1908; Copenhagen, Stat. Mus. Kst). In 1912 Weie visited Paris for the first time, and later in the same year he stayed on the island of Christiansø. Both of these experiences led to a new stage in his development. The colour surface gained a broader and more Cubist character. He began a series of freely-imaginative figurative compositions, in which sea, rocks and figures were woven into a turbulent drama. Among these are different depictions of Poseidon, such as ...

Article

Leif Østby

(b Christiania [now Oslo], Oct 7, 1859; d Lillehammer, Feb 10, 1927).

Norwegian painter . He was descended from a Bohemian family of glassmakers who settled in Norway c. 1750. He studied at Knud Bergslien’s art school (1879–81) and at the same time at the Royal School of Design in Christiania, and in 1883 he was a pupil of Frits Thaulow, who introduced him to plein-air painting. Wentzel paid a short visit to Paris that same year and stayed there again in 1884 as a pupil of William-Adolphe Bouguereau at the Académie Julian. In 1888–9 he studied with Alfred Roll and Léon Bonnat at the Académie Colarossi. During this period he painted mainly interiors with figures, the urban middle-class and artisans in their homes, and also artists’ studios. His earliest paintings, for example Breakfast I (1882; Oslo, N.G.), render detail with a meticulousness unsurpassed in Norwegian Naturalism. Wentzel’s work gradually adopted an influence from contemporary French painting, including a more subtle observation of the effects of light and atmosphere on local colour, as in the ...

Article

Leif Østby

( Theodor )

(b Vinger, Feb 11, 1855; d Oslo, Nov 23, 1938).

Norwegian painter, draughtsman and printmaker . He studied in Christiania (later Kristiania, now Oslo) in 1873–5 under Julius Middelthun, who discovered his unusual gift for drawing, and then at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Munich (1876–9). Among his early paintings, Female Half-nude (1877; Bergen, Billedgal.) is typical in revealing an interest in individual personality and psychology even in a traditional academic subject. In 1878, while on a visit to Kristiania, Werenskiold met the collector and editor Peter Christien Asbjørnsen (1812–85) and was engaged as an illustrator for his new edition of Norwegian fairy tales (Kristiania, 1879). Together with Theodor Kittelsen, he continued to contribute illustrations to Absjørnsen’s publications. In his drawings for tales such as De Kongsdøtre i berget det blå (‘The three princesses in the mountain-in-the-blue’; Kristiania, 1887), he achieved a striking combination of realistic observation, fantasy and humour, his imaginary creatures being especially successful. During the 1880s Werenskiold was also active as a painter. He left Munich early in ...

Article

Zervos  

Isabelle Monod-Fontaine

French collectors, writers and patrons. Christian Zervos (b Cephalonia, Greece, 1 Jan 1889; d Paris, 12 Sept 1970) was of Greek origin and worked briefly for the magazine L’Art d’aujourd’hui, before founding Cahiers d’art in 1926. Covering contemporary painting and sculpture, music, architecture, film and photography, this magazine was internationally acclaimed not only for its promotion of major modernist artists but also for its immaculate presentation and typography. Its authors included critics, historians and aestheticians (Zervos himself, Tériade, Maurice Raynal, Georges Duthuit, P. G. Bruguière, Dupin), lending each issue a balance of historical analysis and poetic sensibility. Zervos’s concern with the relationship of image to text also extended to confrontations between contemporary art and non-European or primitive sources, such as Cycladic, African, or Oceanic art.

In addition to his editorial work, Zervos published his own monograph on Henri Rousseau (1927) and then books by other authors on Frank Lloyd Wright (...