You are looking at  41-60 of 305 results  for:

  • Ceramics and Pottery x
  • 1800–1900 x
Clear All

Article

Gordon Campbell

English centre of ceramics production. Town in Derbyshire where a group of manufacturers of household wares in brown stoneware were active from the 18th century to the early 20th. The most prominent factories were Oldfield & Co. and S. & H. Briddon. The Brampton potter Thomas Davenport (1815–88) emigrated to Utah, where he and his descendants worked as potters....

Article

Claudine Stensgaard Nielsen

[Andersen, Hans]

(b Brændekilde, Fyn, April 7, 1857; d Jyllinge, March 30, 1942).

Danish painter, glass designer and ceramicist. He trained as a stonemason and then studied sculpture in Copenhagen at the Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi (1877–81), where he decided to become a painter. In 1884 he changed his name from Andersen to Brendekilde after his place of birth, as he was constantly being confused with his friend Laurits Andersen Ring, who moreover also took the name of his birthplace. In the 1880s Brendekilde and Ring painted together on Fyn and influenced each other’s work. Brendekilde’s art had its origin in the lives of people of humble means and in the country environment of previous centuries. He painted landscapes and genre pictures. He himself was the son of a woodman, and his paintings often contain social comment, as in Worn Out (1889; Odense, Fyn. Kstmus.), which shows the influence of both Jean-François Millet and Jules Bastien-Lepage. Brendekilde was a sensitive colourist, influenced by Impressionism, for example in ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

English pottery established in 1883 by Henry Tooth and William Ault; its formal name was H. Tooth & Co. Ltd. Tooth had recently left Linthorpe Art Pottery, where he had worked with Christopher Dresser, who continued to contribute designs to the Bretby pottery. The pottery was initially housed in Church Gresley, Derbys, but with a year it had moved to Woodville, Derbys, where it was to remain until it closed in ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b c. 1779; d c. 1864).

American potter who made red earthenware domestic wares in Goshen, CT, for 72 years. There is little documentary evidence of the activities of most American potters of the period, but Brooks is an exception. The extensive records, together with the archaeological excavation of the site of his pottery, has meant that he is the best understood American potter of the 19th century. His workshop is now a working exhibition in Old Sturbridge Village, where a replica of his kiln was built in ...

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

(b Valcartier, Qué., May 16, 1836; d Trenton, NJ, May 4, 1922).

American sculptor, ceramic modeller and teacher of Canadian birth. Broome received his artistic training at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia, where he was elected an Academician in 1860 and taught (1860–63) in the Life and Antique department. In 1854 he assisted Thomas Crawford with the statues on the pediment of the Senate wing of the US Capitol in Washington, DC, and tried unsuccessfully to establish a firm for architectural terracotta and garden ornaments in Pittsburgh and New York.

From 1875 Broome was employed as a modeller by the firm of Ott & Brewer in Trenton, NJ. The parian porcelain sculpture he created for their display at the Centennial International Exhibition of 1876 in Philadelphia won him medals for ceramic arts (e.g. Plaque; New York, Met.). Following his success at the Exhibition and at the Exposition Universelle of 1878 in Paris, for which he was Special Commissioner from the USA, he was active as a teacher and lecturer and was keenly interested in educational, political and industrial reforms. He also continued as a modeller for potters in Ohio and Trenton, including the ...

Article

(b Leiden, Oct 19, 1877; d Zoeterwoude, Oct 23, 1933).

Dutch potter and sculptor. He trained as a drawing teacher but took a particular interest in bookbinding, decorative woodcuts and household pottery. From the example of the Arts and Crafts Movement he learnt the value of traditional techniques and craftsmanship. In 1898 he settled in Gouda in order to perfect his technical knowledge of pottery-making. Three years later he started his own ceramics firm in Leiderdorp. His ceramics are characterized by their intentionally plain shapes, combined with mostly geometric linear ornament and frequently with sculptural decoration applied in low relief. His work attracted international attention and gained awards at several exhibitions, including the Esposizione Internazionale d’Arte Decorativa in Turin (1902) and the Exposition Universelle et Internationale in Brussels (1910). Around 1907 Brouwer began to experiment with large-scale ceramic decoration. His terracotta ornaments and façade sculptures were greatly admired by contemporary architects, who secured him important commissions in this field, for example the ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

English ceramics manufactory (also known as Wilcox and Co.) founded in Leeds in 1858, originally for the manufacture of bricks and building materials. In 1879 the firm began to produce tiles, display pottery and architectural faience; tiles from this period survive in the sumptuous bathroom of Gledhow Hall in Leeds (decorated for the visit of the Prince of Wales, ...

Article

Annie Scottez-De Wambrechies

(b Paris, Dec 12, 1812; d Paris, March 13, 1893).

French painter. From 1825 to 1828 he was apprenticed as a decorator of porcelain at the Gouverneur Factory in Paris. He then studied under Camille Flers, who taught him to paint landscape en plein air and compelled him to sharpen his powers of observation of nature at the expense of the rules of classical landscape. In 1830 he visited Normandy and on his return to Paris he associated with two avant-garde painters, Philippe-Auguste Jeanron, founder of the Société Libre de Peinture et de Sculpture, and Jules Dupré. The latter was a committed member of the Barbizon school who sought to portray the truthfulness of nature in his landscapes rather than an arranged composition (see Barbizon school). In order to deepen their study of nature, Cabat and Dupré painted together in the Forest of Fontainebleau. In 1832 they also visited the region of Berry. The following year, Cabat exhibited for the first time at the Salon in Paris, where until ...

Article

Bernadette Nelson

Portuguese centre of ceramic production. Documents record kilns operating in the town in 1488, and the first potters were Álvaro Annes, Vicente Annes and Francisco Lopes. However, the modern ceramics tradition with which the town is associated dates to the time of a certain D. Maria ‘dos Cacos’, who is recorded as having attempted to sell his wares in fairs all over Portugal between 1820 and 1853. Pieces attributed to him are rare. He was succeeded by Manuel Cipriano Gomes (fl 1853–7) from Mafra. In addition to producing faience that resembled wares made in the Oporto factories (see Oporto §2), Gomes also produced a body of wares that were strongly influenced by the work of Palissy, Bernard.

In 1884 the Fábrica de Faianças das Caldas da Rainha was established in Lisbon, under the artistic direction of the painter Rafael Bordalo Pinheiro (see Bordalo Pinheiro family §(1)...

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b 1839; d 1901).

Italian pottery manufacturer. In 1878 he founded (together with his brother Giuseppe) the Manifattura Cantagalli in Florence. The factory made Islamic style tin-glazed earthenwares, and also produced imitations and copies of earlier Italian maiolica. In 1892 William De Morgan began spending winters in Florence, where he employed decorators at the Cantagalli pottery to paint his new designs and fired some of his pottery in the Cantagalli kilns; some pieces bear their joint signatures....

Article

Carouge  

Gordon Campbell

Swiss centre of ceramics production. There were three potteries producing creamware in 19th-century Carouge, which was part of Savoy from 1786–1816 and thereafter joined the Swiss canton of Geneva, of which it is now a suburb. The first ran from 1779–1829, the second from 1803–c. 1820 and the third (founded by Abraham Baylon) from 1813 till the early 20th century. Some of the finest pottery was made between 1813 and 1820 at the second of the three potteries; during this period Johann Jakob Dortu owned the pottery, and the manager was Jacques-François Richard. In the 20th century the most important potter was Marcel Noverraz (1899–1972), who settled in Carouge in 1922. The Musée de Carouge has a collection of earthenware produced by the Carouge factory between 1810 and 1930 and of Noverraz Art Deco ceramics made between 1930 and 1960. Carouge is still an important pottery centre, and since ...

Article

(b Anizy-le-Château, Aisne, June 12, 1824; d Sèvres, June 3, 1887).

French sculptor and designer. He was one of the most prolific and versatile sculptors of the 19th century, producing portrait busts, monuments and ideal works, as well as exploiting to the full the commercial opportunities offered by developing technology for the mass production of small-scale sculpture and decorative wares. His style ranged from the unembellished Realism of his male portraits to the neo-Baroque exuberance of his architectural decoration, and his art is particularly associated with the amiable opulence of the Second Empire. He signed his works A. Carrier until c. 1868, thereafter adopting the name Carrier-Belleuse.

Carrier-Belleuse began a three-year apprenticeship with a goldsmith at the age of 13, a training that gave him a lifelong sensitivity to intricate surfaces. In 1840 David d’Angers sponsored his entry to the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, but his straitened financial circumstances led him to study decorative arts at the Petite Ecole. This left him free to produce small models for such commercial manufacturers of porcelain and bronze as ...

Article

(b Lyon, Feb 15, 1855; d Paris, July 1, 1894).

French sculptor and ceramicist. He was brought up in an orphanage and in 1868 entered the studio of a sculptor of religious images named Vermare. In 1874 he became a probationary pupil of Augustin-Alexandre Dumont at the Ecole des Beaux–Arts in Paris but, having failed the tests for full admission, left to set up on his own. He made his début at the Salon of 1875; his first success, however, came after that of 1881, and above all from a private exhibition organized by the Cercle des Arts Libéraux in 1882. Most of his sculptural work, principally bronze portrait busts cast by the lost-wax method, was carried out between 1881 and 1888. It includes portraits of contemporaries, for example Jules Breton and Léon Gambetta (plaster casts of both, Paris, Petit Pal.); historical representations, for example of Frans Hals and Diego Velázquez (plaster casts of both, Paris, Petit Pal.); and a number of ideal busts—Symbolist reinterpretations of the academic ...

Article

K. Somervell

English ceramics factory. The factory was founded in 1837 by Edward Bingham (d 1872) in Castle Hedingham, Essex, where there were good-quality deposits of clay. The earliest output was earthenware for local use. During the 1850s Bingham’s son Edward Bingham (1829–c. 1900) took over the factory, and more decorative wares were produced. The first pieces of ornamental ware were red terracotta baskets introduced in 1853 and trelliswork cache-pots in 1854. By 1860 over 60 different types of unglazed vases, baskets and bowls were being produced. In the 1870s more ambitious glazed wares were made. From 1875 lead-glazed wares with moulded reliefs and sgraffito decoration were manufactured in quantity. Included in the range were wares that reflect Bingham’s interest in ceramic products of the 16th and 17th centuries. The range of wares include tigs, mugs, candlesticks, miniature vessels and large vases. In 1899 Bingham’s son Edward William Bingham (...

Article

Gordon Campbell

English pottery factory established in the Yorkshire town of Castleford in 1790 by David Dunderdale, whose company (David Dunderdale & Co.) produced fine cream-coloured earthenware and white stoneware decorated in blue and black; the best-known products of the factory are teapots. The mark, which was impressed, was d d & ...

Article

John Sandon

English family of ceramic manufacturers. Robert Chamberlain (bapt Worcester, 1 Aug 1736; d Worcester, 19 Dec 1798) is believed to have been the first apprentice employed at the Worcester Porcelain Co. who progressed to become the senior decorator in charge of the painting and gilding departments. His son Humphrey Chamberlain (b Worcester, 13 April 1762; d 1841) joined him, and together they were responsible for overseeing the entire ornamental work done at the company from the late 1770s until 1786–7, when they left to form their own decorating workshop. Around 1788 they finally broke with the factory (then owned by Thomas Flight (1726–1800) and managed by his sons John (c. 1766–91) and Joseph (c. 1762–1838)) and bought white porcelain from the Caughley Porcelain Factory for enamelling. By 1790 the Chamberlains were manufacturing their own porcelain and employed skilled painters and gilders to produce some of the richest Regency porcelain. Their most celebrated productions were a Japan-style service (...

Article

(b Sèvres, Hauts-de-Seine, 1835; d Choisy-le-Roi, Val-de-Marne, 1909).

French potter. He was apprenticed at the Sèvres porcelain factory, studying historic styles and techniques. From 1857 to 1874 he produced painted earthenware at the Laurin factory in Bourg-la-Reine, Hauts-de-Seine. In 1875 he joined an experimental workshop in Auteuil, Paris, where he worked with Félix Bracquemond. The studio was owned by Charles Haviland (1839–1921) and provided moulds and underglaze decoration for the Haviland factory at Limoges. In the early 1870s Chaplet pioneered barbotine, a method of underglaze painting in coloured slips (see fig.). With the help of in-house and freelance artists, skilled copies were made of works by Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Watteau and the Italian masters, or landscapes and still-lifes of fruit and flowers. Barbotine vases, jugs and bottles quickly became fashionable, but the pieces were difficult to fire and after a few years the factory abandoned the technique. The Haviland company made a second studio available to Chaplet in ...

Article

Mikhail F. Kiselyov

(Vasil’yevich)

(b Valayka Station, Novgorod Province [now Lykoshino, Tver’ region], 1878; d en route from Germany to Paris, Feb 22, 1936).

Russian graphic artist, ceramicist, painter and designer. In 1896 he studied at the School of Drawing at the Society for the Encouragement of the Arts and in 1897 at Maria Tenisheva’s art school in St Petersburg, where he worked under Il’ya Repin until 1900. In 1904 he worked in the pottery studio at the Abramtsevo colony. At this period he employed Art Nouveau elements in his work, as in the majolica decorations for the Hotel Metropole, St Petersburg (early 1900s) and the majolica panel St George Triumphant for the Municipal Primary School on Bol’shaya Tsaritsynskaya [now Bol’shaya Pirogovskaya] Street in Moscow (1909). He took up book illustration in 1904 and his graphic talent flourished in the 1910s. His work for Apollon was particularly successful, his illustrations first appearing in its pages in 1911. Chekhonin soon became an original and skilful artist, using a sharp and elastic line interspersed with dots. From ...

Article

(b Lyon, 1798; d Paris, June 16, 1838).

French painter, designer and interior decorator. Throughout his career he was an advocate of the importance of art and design for industry and manufacture. In 1830 he was appointed adviser to the Sèvres Porcelain Factory by the director Alexandre Brongniart (1770–1847). There Chenavard made cartoons for stained-glass windows, a stoneware ‘Vase de la Renaissance’ shown at the 1833 Sèvres exhibition and designs for the Duc d’Orléans (future King Louis-Philippe), such as a silver-gilt ewer made by M. Durant and shown at the 1834 Paris Exposition Universelle. Chenavard exhibited designs at the Paris Salons of 1827, 1831, 1833 and 1834, among them his Gothic-style designs, in collaboration with Achille Mascret, for the decoration of the chapel at the château of Eu, and his sketches for the restoration of the Théâtre Français and Opéra Comique in Paris. Material by Chenavard is preserved in the Musée National de Céramique at Sèvres and the ...

Article

Fabio Benzi

(b Florence, Dec 2, 1873; d Florence, Aug 24, 1956).

Italian painter and potter. He began his artistic activity at a very early age, as a decorator and fresco painter. In 1894, as a pupil of the Italian painter Augusto Burchi (b 1853), he painted a ceiling and a frieze in the Palazzo Budini–Gattai in Florence; these frescoes are in a lively style combining naturalism with elements derived from Italian painting of the 16th century. In the following years Chini was influenced by the Pre-Raphaelites and by Art Nouveau, for example in illustrations for the magazine Fiammetta in 1896–7, in Portrait of my Sister Pia (1897; priv. col., see 1987 exh. cat., p. 20) and in paintings enriched by Divisionist effects, such as Seashore in Versilia (1899; priv. col., see 1987 exh. cat., p. 21).

By the early 1900s Chini was working in a wholly Symbolist idiom, as in Self-portrait (1901; Pistoia, Cassa di Risparmio, see ...