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Çigdem Kafesçioglu and Walter B. Denny

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(b Maple, Ont., May 25, 1879; d Cherkley, nr Leatherhead, June 9, 1964).

British publisher, financier, politician, collector and patron, of Canadian birth. As Minister of Information during World War I, he was responsible for the War Records Office in London, through which Wyndham Lewis, Muirhead Bone, William Orpen, Christopher Nevinson, Augustus John and six Canadian artists, J. W. Beatty (1869–1941), Maurice Cullen, C. W. Simpson (1878–1942), Fred Varley, David Milne and A. Y. Jackson, received commissions to record Canada’s military contribution to the war effort. The Canadian War Memorials were deposited at the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, in 1921, and since then all but the major canvases have been transferred to the Canadian War Museum, also in Ottawa.

Beaverbrook was instrumental in developing the National Gallery of Canada’s collection of historical pictures; he was directly responsible for the gift of Benjamin West’s The Death of Wolfe by the Duke of Westminster in 1918, and the acquisition of ...

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R. Krauss

[Amenophis IV, Neferkheperurewaenre]

(reg c. 1353–c. 1336 bc).

King of Egypt in the late 18th Dynasty, son of Amenophis III and husband of Nefertiti. His reign was characterized by revolutionary changes in religion and art. Soon after his accession, Amenophis IV, as Akhenaten was at first known, began to build a temple complex at Thebes for the Aten, the disc-shaped manifestation of the traditional sun-god Re. In the fifth year of his reign, he founded a new capital in Middle Egypt at the site now known as Amarna, (Tell) el-: the period roughly encompassed by Akhenaten’s reign is therefore usually known as the Amarna period. Thereafter the King changed his name to Akhenaten (‘Beneficial to the Aten’), and throughout Egypt the worship of traditional gods was neglected, while the cult of the previously pre-eminent god Amun was actively persecuted.

Akhenaten’s name is inextricably associated with the Amarna style created during his reign, according to which the King, his family and their relationship to the sun-god were the only proper subjects for art. Reliefs in the earlier Amarna style are known from reused fragments (the so-called ...

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Marianne Barrucand

[‛Alawī; Filālī]

Islamic dynasty and rulers of Morocco since 1631. Like their predecessors the Sa‛dis, the ‛Alawis are sharīfs (descendants of the Prophet Muhammad), and both dynasties are sometimes classed together as the ‘Sharifs of Morocco’. From a base in the Tafilalt region of south-east Morocco, the ‛Alawi family was able to overcome the centrifugal forces exerted by the Berber tribes who had destroyed the Sa‛di state in the first half of the 17th century. To restore political authority and territorial integrity, Mawlay Isma‛il (reg 1672–1727) added a new black slave corps to the traditional tribal army. Although royal power was weak during the 19th century and the early 20th, when the French and Spanish established protectorates, the ‛Alawis’ power was fully restored after independence from the French in 1956.

‛Alawi building activities (see Islamic art, §II, 7(v)) were concentrated in the four cities that have served as their capitals: Fez and Marrakesh at various times from ...

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Marcus Burke

[Alvárez de Toledo] [now Berwick y Alba]

Spanish family of politicians and collectors. The prominent role of the Alvárez de Toledo family in the history of Spain and the dynastic marriages that have joined many other titles into the house of Berwick y Alba have placed the Alba collection among the finest in Europe. Don Fernando Alvárez de Toledo (1507–82), the ‘Gran-Duque’ de Alba, Governor of the Netherlands (from 1567), commissioned paintings from Anthonis Mor and Titian (General Pardon Conceded to Flanders by the Duque de Alba; Christ in the House of Martha; portrait of Don Fernando Alvárez de Toledo, Duque de Alba, in Armour; all Madrid, Pal. Liria, Col. Duke of Alba). His namesake, Don Fernando Alvárez de Toledo, the 6th duke, returned to Spain in 1653 from an embassy in Italy with a large shipment of works of art. The family collection, which included an impressive holding of tapestries, was housed in the palace of La Abadia in Extremadura and at the former ducal seat in Alba de Tormes....

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Olivier Michel and Luca Leoncini

Italian family of ecclesiastics, patrons and collectors.

Olivier Michel

(b Urbino, July 22, 1649; elected Nov 23, 1700; d Rome, March 19, 1721).

He became a cleric at the age of 28 after pursuing studies in law, literature, philosophy and theology in Rome. When working within the curia he acted in succession as governor of Rieti, Spoleto and Orvieto. In this same period he was involved in the academic activities of the intellectual circle around Christina, Queen of Sweden. He was created a cardinal in 1690, receiving the title first of S Maria in Aquiro, then of S Adriano and finally of S Silvestro in Capite. As cardinal he initiated the restoration of S Brigida, Rome, where the ceiling fresco by Biagio Puccini of St Bridget in Glory (late 1690s) incorporates his papal coat of arms. His pontificate as Clement XI was disturbed by the War of the Spanish Succession (...

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(b Amsterdam, Aug 13, 1820; d Amsterdam, March 17, 1889).

Dutch writer, critic and collector. He was raised in a cultivated and artistic merchant family but preferred writing to commerce. In addition to serving as an editor of the Volksalmanak voor Nederlandsche Katholieken, he published the Dietsche Warande. His lifelong advocacy of Roman Catholic emancipation is reflected in many of his short stories (written under the pseudonym Pauwels Foreestier) concerning Catholic life in 17th-century Holland. In 1876 he was appointed professor of aesthetics and the history of art at the Rijksacademie voor Beeldenden Kunsten, Amsterdam. An architectural preservationist and an important critic of the art and architecture of his time, he asserted that art should serve a religious function, as it had during the Middle Ages. It should be social, idealistic and transcendental. In his ideal society the arts would form a harmonious unit under the heading of architecture. His brother-in-law P. J. H. Cuypers was the leading Dutch architect of the day, whose career was assisted by Alberdingk Thijm’s advocacy of Gothic Revivalism in architecture. Alberdingk Thijm was particularly opposed to the painters of the Barbizon and Hague schools, whose work he considered to have no underlying purpose. Rather, he preferred the Düsseldorf school, which displayed a knowledge of history and literature. His large collections reflected his philosophical orientation. His numerous 17th and 18th-century Dutch paintings, mostly by minor masters, represented all the genres. He also owned a large collection of drawings and prints, as well as books, manuscripts and religious art from the Middle Ages and Renaissance, which included a Gothic ciborium, a Byzantine crucifix and embroideries on silk, which were dispersed at auction after his death (Amsterdam, Muller, ...

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Claire Baines

(b Dec 12, 1479; d ?Bologna, c. April 1552).

Italian historian, topographer, writer and patron. He was a friar and first entered the Dominican Order at Forlì but was in Bologna from 1495 and was officially transferred to the monastery there in 1500. Alberti received an extensive grounding in humanist studies under the Bolognese rhetorician Giovanni Garzoni. After acting as companion to the head of the order, Tomaso de Vio Cajetan, Alberti was made Provinciale di Terra Santa in Rome in 1520. This included the role of travelling companion to Tomaso’s successor, Fra Silvestri da Ferrara (‘il Ferrariense’). His travels with Silvestri throughout Italy, including the islands, laid the foundations for his most important work, the Descrittione di tutta l’Italia (1550), modelled on the Italia illustrata of Flavio Biondo. It was reprinted many times: the Venice edition of 1561 was the first to include Alberti’s sections on the islands of Italy, which were not covered by Biondo; the Venice edition of ...

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Janet Southorn

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Zilah Quezado Deckker

(b Alhandra, nr Lisbon, 1500; d Lisbon, 1580).

Portuguese statesman, patron and writer. He was the natural son of Afonso d’Albuquerque (1453–1515), who was involved in the Portuguese conquest of India. In 1506 he was legitimized by Manuel I, who ordered that he take the name of Afonso in honour of his father. Marriage to Dona Maria de Noronha, daughter of the Conde de Linhares, a minister of the King, together with royal favours, brought him a substantial fortune; he later became the Inspector of Finances to John III and President of the Senate of Lisbon. His Commentarios de Affonso d’Albuquerque (1557), based on his father’s memoirs, became a standard history of the Portuguese in India. In 1521 Albuquerque travelled to Italy in the suite of the Infanta Dona Beatriz and developed an interest in Italian Renaissance architecture. This is apparent in the work carried out to the late 15th-century Quinta da Bacalhoa, Azeitão, which he purchased in ...

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Italian family of lawyers, ecclesiastics and patrons. The family was Florentine, of ancient origin but modest distinction. Silvestro Aldobrandini (1499–1558) was a lawyer whose republican leanings forced him into exile after the restoration of the Medici in Florence in 1527. In 1548 he secured the protection of Cardinal Alessandro Farnese, under whose aegis his career and family flourished in Rome in the service of successive popes. Silvestro’s son, Ippolito, who became (1) Pope Clement VIII, elevated the family to the pinnacle of its fortune. He created his nephews (2) Pietro Aldobrandini and Cinzio Passeri (1551–1610) cardinals in 1593 and made them his principal secretaries of state. Cinzio was the son of Clement VIII’s sister; he took the name Aldobrandini on his uncle’s election, but was generally known as the Cardinal di S Giorgio in Velabro. He is chiefly distinguished as the last patron and protector of the poet Torquato Tasso and was also an avid collector of antiquities, including the then recently discovered ancient Roman fresco known as the ...

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Howard Colvin

(b Westminster, London, Jan 1647 or 1648; d Oxford, Dec 14, 1710).

English architect and scholar. The son of Henry Aldrich, later auditor to James, Duke of York, he was educated at Westminster School, London, and at Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated as a BA in 1666 and an MA in 1669. He remained in Oxford for the rest of his life, becoming in 1682 a canon of Christ Church and in 1689 Dean of the College and Cathedral. From 1692 to 1695 he served as Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University.

Aldrich was a highly accomplished man who was well known for his learning in many fields. He edited Greek and Latin texts, wrote a standard book on logic, and also published works on mathematics, music and architecture. He had a large library that included books on antiquities and many architectural and other engravings. He left his library to Christ Church, where it remains, but directed that all his personal papers were to be destroyed. As a result, relatively little is known about his architectural interests and activities. However, there is reason to think that he had visited France and Italy, and he was certainly regarded by contemporaries as an authority on architectural matters. He was himself an excellent draughtsman and made the drawings for the allegorical engravings that decorate the Oxford almanacks for ...

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Olivier Bonfait and François Quiviger

[Aldovrandi]

Italian family of patrons. The Aldrovandi were one of the oldest patrician families in Bologna and were prominent in the city’s civic life from at least the 12th century. Giovanni Francesco Aldrovandi (d 1512) was ambassador to Rome and Ferrara, a poet and patron of literature. According to Vasari, Michelangelo stayed in Aldrovandi’s palazzo in 1494–5 (see Michelangelo §I 1., (i)). The most renowned family member was (1) Ulisse Aldrovandi, the naturalist and antiquarian. Conte Filippo Aldrovandi commissioned paintings from Guercino, such as the Portrait of a Dog (c. 1625; Pasadena, CA, Norton Simon Mus.), and fresco decorations in the Villa Giovannina, near Cento. The earliest inventory of the family collection (1644) lists 72 items; by c. 1690 this had grown to 293. Pompeo Aldrovandi (1668–1752), who was made a cardinal in 1734, began rebuilding the family palazzo (now the Palazzo Montanari) in ...

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