1,021-1,034 of 1,034 Results  for:

  • Interior Design and Furniture x
Clear all

Article

Gordon Campbell

Article

Elisabeth Gurock

( fl 1585–1623).

German cabinetmaker . The documents showing that in 1585 he was working for the Bavarian court, and that the court of Mantua wished to secure his services, indicate that he possessed unusual qualities as an artist and craftsman: this is confirmed by his principal works, which have not survived, but are recorded in illustrations. Wörtz was commissioned to execute all the carpentry for the interior of the former Dominican monastery church in Ulm, later called the Dreifaltigkeitskirche or Spitalkirche (destr. World War II). The perfectly unified furnishings included the high altar (1618), the pulpit with its superstructure, the gallery balustrade, the signed choir stalls (1623) and the pews in the nave. In 1891 the general appearance of the richly carved furnishings was severely impaired by the application of brown varnish, and in 1944 bombing destroyed them completely.

Thieme–Becker H. Krins: ‘Instandsetzung und Imbau der Dreifaltigkeitskirche in Ulm im Rahmen des Schwerpunktprogrammes der Landesregierung’, ...

Article

Monique D. J. M. Teunissen

(b Leeuwarden, May 10, 1885; d Wassenaar, Oct 25, 1946).

Dutch architect and furniture designer . He trained as an apprentice (c. 1905–14) in the offices of H. P. Berlage and of Eduard Pfeiffer (1889–1929) in Munich. From 1917 to 1934 he worked as an interior designer for the firm of H. Pander & Zonen in The Hague, also designing a shop (1932; destr.) for them in Rotterdam. He designed mass-produced furniture, lighting and interiors for homes, offices, ships and exhibitions. His first well-known commission was for the interiors of the Villa Sevensteyn (1920–21) built by W. M. Dudok in Zorgvliet Park, The Hague. They are characterized by a strongly marked simplicity, a cubic joining together of volumes, well-balanced spatial effects and a practical division of the floor-plan. He also practised independently as an architect; in his designs, such as that for the Villa De Luifel (1924) in Wassenaar, Wouda showed himself to be strongly influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright. The division of its façades is dominated by horizontal accents, and the buildings are generally low; penthouses, balustrades and built-on flower boxes, as well as large windows, provide accents on the exterior....

Article

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b 1915).

Japanese industrial designer , active in the USA. He worked in Charlotte Perriand ’s Japanese office, and in the 1950s emigated to the USA, where he designed two stools that have since become famous: the fibreglass ‘Elephant’ stool (1954), which was the first all-plastic stool, and the ‘Butterfly’ stool (...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Article

Enrico Colle and Gordon Campbell

(b Bayeux, 1762; d 1838).

French furniture-maker , active in Italy. He worked in Paris from 1795 (or earlier) and established his own workshop in 1799. Elisa, Grand Duchess of Tuscany (Napoleon's sister), invited Youf to Lucca, where he settled in 1805. He made numerous pieces in the Empire style for the refurbishment of the Palazzo Pitti and other former residences of the Medici family. Youf's name often appears in the catalogues of exhibitions in Lucca, where between ...

Article

Torbjörn Fulton

( fl Sweden, 1663–6).

German stuccoist, also active in Sweden . His earliest known works were stuccos in the palace (early 1660s; destr. 1944) of C. G. Wrangel in Stralsund, where he co-operated with Giovanni Anhtoni . They arrived together in Sweden in 1663 and executed work in Wrangel’s Stockholm palace on Riddarholmen. Later, up to 1664, in Skokloster Castle, they created three ceilings in the master suite, either working together or separately. The Skokloster ceiling (1663–4) in the King’s Hall, which links the two halves of the master suite, is a vast surface clearly divided by sturdy, richly profiled frames into a central octagonal compartment and four round corner panels. In the central compartment, the figure of a young man dressed in Roman soldier’s costume, apparently pouring liquid from a drinking horn into the nose or eye of a winged dragon, has been interpreted as that of Apollo, Jason or (most likely) Daniel. In the four corner panels are depicted figures representing Europe, Asia, Africa and America. Between the panels are decorative figures and flowers and heavy scroll ornaments. The heavy, almost toppling sculptural quality of the ceiling is set off by bright colours, at least partially preserved in their original state....

Article

Article

Christina Thon

German family of artists. (1) Johann Baptist Zimmermann and (2) Dominikus Zimmermann were the sons of Elias Zimmermann (1656–95), a stuccoworker and mason from Wessobrunn, whose work is known only from documentary sources. It is almost certain that they learnt their craft as stuccoists in the Wessobrunn school ( see Stucco and plasterwork §III 10., (i), (e) ). While Dominikus was almost exclusively associated with Bavarian and Swabian religious architecture, Johann Baptist became the leading representative of 18th-century interior decoration at the Bavarian court. Their collaboration was very influential on the development of Bavarian Rococo ( see Rococo §III ). Their extensive output required a large studio or workshop: among Johann Baptist’s assistants were his sons Johann Joseph Zimmermann (1707–43) and Franz Michael Zimmermann (1709–84), who were both painters and stuccoists and contributed to the frescoes of the pilgrimage church at Steinhausen, near Schussenried, and the stuccowork at Seligenthal Abbey, Landshut (see below). Franz Michael succeeded his father as court stuccoist to the Elector. Dominikus’s son, ...

Article

Heidrun Zinnkann and Gordon Campbell

German term for a Neo-classical style that emerged c. 1770, corresponding to the French Louis XVI style. The term means ‘pig-tail style’, an allusion to the ancien régime. In the Zopfstil, early Neo-classical phase, traditional furniture continued to be made but with some updating of ornament. In the secrétaire, for example, serpentine Rococo forms were replaced by rectangular, more architectural designs, while marquetry decoration became confined to the centre of a drawer, door panel or fall-front. The new repertory of ornament used by cabinetmakers such as David Roentgen included such motifs as festoons, floral bands, paterae vases, metopes and triglyphs. The trend towards simplicity was firmly established by the end of the century. A favourite Zopfstil design type was the roll-top desk, which had been developed in France and eventually replaced the writing-cabinet or secrétaire. The desk cover, in the form of a quarter cylinder, retracted when the writing compartment was opened. The principled simplicity of the ...

Article

Bernard Jacqué

French wallpaper manufacturing company established in 1790 in Mulhouse, Alsace. Originally the company was set up under the name of Nicolas Dolfus & Cie with Joseph-Louis Malaine (1745–1809), a designer from the Gobelins, as artistic director. In 1795 it changed its name to Hartmann, Risler & Cie, and in 1797 it moved to the commandery of Rixheim at the Mulhouse city gates. It was bought out in 1802 by Jean Zuber (1773–1852), the head of the marketing side of the business, whose name the company adopted and whose descendants remained in possession of the company until 1968.

Zuber was the driving-force behind the company. He ensured high-quality production by employing such excellent designers as Eugene Ehrmann (1804–96) and Georges Zipelius (1808–90), who designed ‘Décor chinois’ (1832; U. Manchester, Whitworth A.G.), and by perfecting new wallpaper manufacturing techniques: irisé or blended colourgrounds from ...

Article

Sabine Heym

Italian–Swiss family of stuccoists, builders and architects active in Bavaria . The first important member of the family was Giovanni Battista Zuccalli (d 1678), a stuccoist recorded as working in Kempten (Allgäu) in 1661. His son-in-law Gaspare [Kaspar] Zuccalli (1629–78) and a cousin Domenico Christoforus Zuccalli ( fl 1651; d 1702) worked together (until c. 1666), designing and building churches and conventual buildings in Upper Bavaria and the Innviertel district. Gaspare, following his appointment (1668) as master mason to the Bavarian electoral court, brought (1) Enrico Zuccalli, son of Giovanni Battista, to Munich. Enrico, who had previously trained in Paris in the circle of Gianlorenzo Bernini, became the most important architect in the family and one of the most prominent architects in the circle of Italian-influenced builders from the Grisons. In later years he trained his young cousin Giovanni Gaspare Zuccalli (...

Article

Sjarel Ex

(b Zaandijk, May 28, 1885; d Wassenaar, Sept 27, 1977).

Dutch designer and typographer . After working in the tradition of the Arts and Crafts Movement, he came into contact in 1917 with De Stijl, which fundamentally changed the course of his work. Through Vilmos Huszár and Jan Wils, he met H. P. Berlage, for whom he worked as a draughtsman, and international artists working in typographic design, such as Kurt Schwitters, El Lissitsky and Jan Tschichold. His international importance is based on typographical works, such as those he made between 1923 and 1930 for NKF, the Dutch cable works, and for PTT, the Dutch postal service. His advertisements, inspired by Dada, often used a wide range of typography and could be read as messages, poems or advertising slogans, while being appreciated simply as designs. Zwart was also active as an interior designer; his most successful work in this field was the kitchen (1938) that he designed for the ...