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Dodge, Adeelocked

(b Wheatfield-Sonsela, AZ, June 17, 1912; d Albuquerque, NM, 1992).
  • G. Lola Worthington

Native American (Navajo) painter. Also known as Hashke-yil-e-dale, Dodge was the son of Bitanny Dodge and grandson of Chee Dodge, the first Navajo Tribal Chairman, who raised him and sent him to Bacone College, Muskogee, OK, and the University of New Mexico, where Dodge earned a degree in anthropology in 1933. He earned a master’s degree in Comparative Linguistics and Anthropology, at Columbia University, in 1935.

During World War II, Dodge was a Code Talker in the South Pacific. Injured after four years in battle, he recuperated from his injuries and began to sketch and paint Navajo history, illustrating the cultural and religious systems from the viewpoint of a Navajo. He believed his paintings offered vital information and explanations to prevent the loss of Navajo ceremonial chants and religious traditions.

Entirely self-taught, he actively began to paint in 1954 and selected specific symbols, colors and stories to best express Navajo practices. Each subject, color, dot or feather, accompanied by his personal insight, symbolically preserved his subjects. Horses, maidens, dancers and swirls reflected balance in his compositions. Intuitive, graceful lines, colors, forms and his subject’s appeal reveal truthful honest representations. The bluebird, symbolic of the Eastern Seagoing people, and the flying swallow, symbolic of the Western Swallow people, were included in his paintings. Mixing neutral background with active flourishes, mysterious uncanny counter color and symbolic graphic line work, his paintings are thrilling and awe-inspiring.

Dodge only sold paintings to those he felt appreciated the importance and significance of his artwork. His work was acquired by the Smithsonian Institution. Arizona State University, Tempe, commissioned him to paint several Administration Building murals.

See also: Navajo.

Bibliography

  • D. Dunn: American Indian Painting of the Southwest and Plains Areas (Albuquerque, NM, 1968)
  • R. Henkes: Native American Painters of the Twentieth Century: The Works of 61 Artists (Jefferson, NC, 1995)
  • P. Lester: “Adee Dodge,” The Biographical Directory of Native American Painters (Tulsa, OK, 1995)