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Article

A. B.  

Monogram.

Monogram attributed to Abraham Bosse.

Article

Dutch, 18th century, male.

Active at the beginning of the 18th century.

Died 4 January 1742, in Leiden.

Painter, draughtsman, illustrator.

Leiden School.

Hillebrand van der Aa is believed to have been related to Pietersz. Boudewyn and Hillebrand van der Aa. He served an apprenticeship in the bookselling trade but, at the same time, developed his skills in the fine arts and was admitted to the Leiden painters' guild on ...

Article

Dutch, 18th century, male.

Born 5 December 1713, in Amsterdam; died 5 March 1793.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman, illustrator. Landscapes with figures, urban views, interiors.

Nicolaas Aartman worked for booksellers and executed a number of small drawings for illustrated books. There are two fine drawings of interiors by him in Amsterdam. His work was engraved by Kornleim and Jan Schoute....

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1763, in Exeter; died 1851.

Painter, watercolourist, engraver, draughtsman, illustrator. Landscapes with figures, natural history (animals/insects).

John White Abbott took up painting initially as a hobby but became well known for his landscapes with animals and human figures. He was particularly influenced by the lesser Dutch masters, notably Peter de Laes. His work sufficiently impressed contemporaries such as Sir Joshua Reynolds and Benjamin West that they urged him to exhibit at the Royal Academy, and he submitted work to the Academy between ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1757, in Niort (Deux-Sèvres); died 1828.

Painter, copyist. Religious subjects, mythological subjects, portraits.

His religious and mythological scenes and his portraits sometimes have a lyric quality reminiscent of Delacroix. He is also known for his Schemes for a New System for Promotion of the Arts...

Article

Italian, 18th century, male.

Born c. 1750, in Rome.

Painter, copyist. Religious subjects.

Followed in the footsteps of his mentor Christoph Unterberger, painting chiefly churches, but also produced drawings for subsequent engraving, notably: Christ on the Cross (De la Cour) and Life of Jesus and the Virgin...

Article

Spanish, 18th century, male.

Born 1731, in Yecla; died 1800, in Mexico City.

Painter, copyist. Portraits.

Ginés de Aguirre went to Madrid early in his career, in 1745, to study at the Real Academia de San Fernando. While in Madrid, he made a serious study of Velázquez and Luca Giordano, and painted copies of the two great masters' works. He also produced numerous portraits of King Charles III. In ...

Article

Spanish, 18th century, male.

Active in Madrid.

Painter, draughtsman, illustrator.

Alcantara drew vignettes for Moreno Texada and Blas Ametller's engravings for the 1798-1799 edition of Don Quixote, published in Madrid.

Article

Dutch, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 9 May 1769, in Amsterdam; died 4 December 1839, in Utrecht.

Painter, copyist. Figures.

Villem Alewyn became well known for his copies of the great Dutch masters.

Amsterdam (Rijksmus.): Old Man

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1785; died 8 April 1851.

Painter, watercolourist, engraver, draughtsman, illustrator. Portraits, genre scenes, hunting scenes (hunting with hounds), sporting subjects.

Henry Alken showed two portraits at London's Royal Academy in 1801 and 1802. Alken was first and foremost a painter of hunting and sporting subjects. In ...

Article

Peter Walch

(b Alloa, Feb 13, 1744; d Edinburgh, Aug 6, 1796).

Scottish painter and illustrator. In 1755 he was apprenticed to Robert Foulis, a printer who, with his brother Andrew Foulis, founded the Foulis Academy, Glasgow, at which Allan was a student until 1764. Allan’s association with the Foulis brothers was long and fruitful; several of his sets of illustrations in the 1780s were for books published by the brothers. In the mid-1760s Charles, 9th Baron Cathcart (1721–76), and several families, including the Erskines of Mar, provided Allan with funds that enabled him to study in Italy, considered essential at that time for any aspiring artist. He probably reached Rome by 1767 and remained there until 1777. During this period he studied with Gavin Hamilton, the leading Scottish artist resident there, and Hamilton encouraged Allan’s ambitions to become a history painter.

In 1771 Allan sent two history pictures to the Royal Academy exhibition in London: Pompey the Great after his Defeat...

Article

Danish, 18th century, male.

Born 16 May 1725 or or, in Copenhagen; died 1776.

Painter, copyist.

Peder Als began his studies with Carl Gustaf Pilo and won the first gold medal at the Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi in Copenhagen in 1755. He went to Rome and, despite being already 30 years old, became a pupil of Raphael Mengs....

Article

Marianne Saabye

(bapt Copenhagen, May 16, 1726; d Copenhagen, July 8, 1776).

Danish painter. Although he was mentioned in the court account-books as early as 1743, his first known painting dates from 1750. From then until 1756 he was active as one of the most important portrait painters of the Danish Rococo. His colouristic style and impasto technique were strongly influenced by the Swedish painter Carl Gustaf Pilo. The double portrait of the Court Jeweller C. F. Fabritius and his Wife (1752; Copenhagen, Stat. Mus. Kst) and the full-length Frederik V (1756; priv. col., see A. Russell, ed.: Danske slotte og herregårde [Danish palaces and manor houses] (Copenhagen, 2/1963–8), iv, p. 385) are among his masterpieces. An important collection of portraits by Als from this period is housed in the Nationalhistoriske Museum på Frederiksborg, Hillerød.

In 1755 Als was the first major gold medal winner at the newly founded Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi in Copenhagen, and the next year he began a six-year study trip to Italy and France. In Rome (...

Article

Dutch, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1760, in 's Hertogenbosch; died 23 February 1820.

Painter, illustrator. History painting, portraits.

Quirinus van Amelsfoort trained in Düsseldorf, where he executed a large number of copies. He later set up work in his native town as a portrait painter, although he also painted historical subjects, including a ...

Article

American, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1775, in New York; died 17 January 1870, in New Jersey.

Engraver, draughtsman, illustrator.

Alexander Anderson, the son of a Scotsman, was the first person to practise wood engraving in the USA. He first studied medicine and qualified as a doctor in ...

Article

Italian, 18th century, male.

Active Roman, active at the end of the 18th century.

Painter, copyist.

Possibly Pietro Angeletti; sent five copies of his work to the London Society of Artists exhibition of 1790.

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Died c. 1773.

Draughtsman, copyist. Mythological subjects, religious subjects, allegorical subjects, genre scenes, landscapes.

Little is known of Robert Ango's life. He is thought to have worked with Giuseppe Grisoni and above all to have been a friend of Jean-Honoré Fragonard. He was essentially a copyist, basing his work on that of Fragonard, Hubert Robert, Rembrandt and Michelangelo. No works of his own have been identified. A. Ananoff, an expert on the circle of François Boucher, discovered that some drawings thought to be Fragonard originals were really the work of Ango. They do not have Fragonard's lightness of touch and line but appear heavy and confused. Ananoff made the same discovery with regard to drawings by Hubert Robert, which are self-evidently copies by Ango. Ango signed these drawings with an A placed after the date, or he noted the original artist's name, but did not imitate his signature. Most of these copies, Ananoff states, date ...

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1752; died 1821.

Engraver, draughtsman, illustrator. Portraits, architectural views, topographical views.

William Angus studied under William Walker and went on to produce a large number of well-executed and pleasing prints of manor houses and family seats in England and Wales. Angus worked as an illustrator and was retained by various topographical publishers of the day. He engraved from his own drawings but also from originals by Shothard, Paul Sandby, Edward Daynes, George Samuel and other leading artists. He is remembered for a series of plates for ...

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in London.

Painter, copyist. Religious subjects, portraits. Miniatures.

An artist by this name figures in the catalogues of the Royal Academy between 1792 and 1829. He is credited with numerous portraits and copies, including Cain and Abel and Jesus and Mary Magdalene...

Article

[Ashraf; ‛Alī Ashraf]

(fl c. 1735–80).

Persian painter. Known for a large number of painted and varnished (‘lacquered’) bookbindings, penboxes and mirror-cases (see Islamic art, §viii, 10), ‛Ali Ashraf worked in a small floral style with a characteristic motif of pansies or African violets on a black ground. His style, notable for its richness and delicacy, is derived directly from that of his teacher Muhammad Zaman but is standardized and simplified. His debt to his teacher can be seen in his signature, az ba‛d-i mu ḥammad ‛alī ashraf ast, which can be read as either ‘‛Ali [the Prophet’s son-in-law] is the noblest after Muhammad [the Prophet]’ or ‘‛Ali Ashraf is a follower of Muhammad [Zaman]’. This is the way he signed four mirror-cases with fine bird-and-flower designs (1740–1, Edinburgh, Royal Mus. Scotlandr, 1921–43; 1747, London, V&A, 758–1876; 1751–2, New York, Brooklyn Mus., 88.92; and 1755–6, London, J. Pope-Hennessy priv. col.) and a similar but undated penbox (Berne, Hist. Mus., 21–...