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Article

Bailly, Alice  

(b Geneva, Feb 25, 1872; d Lausanne, Jan 1, 1938).

Swiss painter and multimedia artist . From 1890/91 she studied under Hugues Bovy (1841–1903) and Denise Sarkissof at the Ecole d’Art in Geneva. A travel scholarship enabled her to study in Munich for a year. From 1904 until the outbreak of World War I Bailly lived in Paris, where she associated with Cubist artists, including Albert Gleizes, Jean Metzinger, Fernand Léger, Marie Laurencin and Sonia Lewitska (1882–1914). From 1905 to 1926 she exhibited regularly at the Salon d’Automne. From 1906 to 1910 her work was influenced by Fauvism, and from 1910 she became interested in Cubism and Futurism: Equestrian Fantasy with Pink Lady (1913; Zurich, Gal. Strunskaja) is reminiscent of the work of Gino Severini or Franz Marc in its rhythmic movement and planar fragmentation of horses and riders into coloured patterns. Other paintings of this period that are also indebted to these movements include ...

Article

Balla, Giacomo  

Italian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 24 July 1871, in Turin; died 5 March 1958, in Rome.

Painter, sculptor.

Futurism, Pittura Metafisica (Metaphysical Painting).

As is so often the case, Giacomo Balla's early work was comparatively unadventurous and conformist. He started out as a painter in Rome in 1895, adopting an essentially academic style that was wholly acceptable to critics and institutions of the day. In 1900, however, he spent seven months in Paris, where he was drawn to the 'divisionist' approach espoused by the Impressionists and, in particular, to the Pointillist style that Georges Seurat adopted and labelled 'scientific impressionism'. It is worth making the point that this 'divisionist' approach was in actual fact one of the more anachronistic features of Futurism, a movement that purported to be innovative in every respect, even to the point where it levelled accusations against the Cubist movement (from which it derived substantially more than the Futurists were ever prepared to admit), on the grounds that Cubism was essentially 'academic painting in disguise'. In the event, from 1901-1902 onwards, Balla went on to teach Umberto Boccioni, arguably the most coherent theoretician and practitioner of Italian Futurism, and Gino Severini, both of whom were influenced by his use of the divisionist technique....

Article

Balla, Giacomo  

Piero Pacini

(b Turin, Aug 18, 1871; d Rome, March 1, 1958).

Italian painter, sculptor, stage designer, decorative artist and actor. He was one of the originators of Futurism (see Furttenbach [Furtenbach; Furttembach], Josef [Joseph], the elder) and was particularly concerned with the representation of light and movement. His personal interest in scientific methods of analysis contributed to both the practical and ideological bases of the movement. His oeuvre from the Futurist period overshadowed the work of later years.

Balla was self-taught and began painting in Turin. In 1895 he settled in Rome. At the age of about 25 he painted some lively sketches of urban life that are characterized by a thick impasto, for example the series Machietta romana (1898; Rome, priv. col., see Lista, 1982, nos 12–17) and landscapes showing familiarity with the divisionism practised by the northern Italian artists Giuseppe Pelizza da Volpedo, Giovanni Segantini and Vittore Grubicy de Dragon, for example Luci di marzo (...

Article

Burlyuk, David  

Marian Burleigh-Motley

(Davidovich)

(b Kharkiv, Ukraine, July 21, 1882; d Southampton, Long Island, NJ, Jan 15, 1967).

Ukrainian painter and writer. He studied art in Kazan’ and Odessa from 1899 to 1901, when he left for Munich to study with Anton Ažbé. In 1904 he attended the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, under Fernand Cormon. Returning to Russia, he settled in Moscow but again studied at the Odessa School of Art from 1910 to 1911 and then entered the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, from which he was expelled in 1914.

From 1908 David had been active in organizing exhibitions promoting the new art that was emerging in Russia. In that year he published his first polemical article, ‘Golos impressionista: V zashchitu zhivopisi’ (‘The voice of an Impressionist: in defence of painting’). In this article he rejected the realistic style of the Wanderers, the outmoded rules of the Academy of Art in St Petersburg and the retrospection of the World of Art (Mir Iskusstva) group, in favour of the styles of the Western Post-Impressionists (whom he here called Impressionists), especially Cézanne and van Gogh. He helped organize and contributed to the controversial ...

Article

Burlyuk, Vladimir Davidovich  

Russian, 20th century, male.

Born 1886, in Tavria or Kershon; died 1917, in Thessalonica.

Painter, illustrator.

Symbolism, Futurism.

Groups: Golubaya Roza (Blue Rose), Bubnovy Valet (Jack of Diamonds), Der Blaue Reiter (Blue Rider).

Vladimir Davidovich Burlyuk was the brother of David Burlyuk. He studied in Odessa and married the sister of the painter Lentulov. Along with his brother, he collaborated on the most important projects of the Russian avant-garde, including with the group ...

Article

Exter, Aleksandra Aleksandrovna  

or Ekster; maiden name: Grigorovich

Russian, 20th century, female.

Active in France from 1924.

Born 1882 or 1884, in Bielostok (Kiev); died 17 March 1949, in Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.

Painter, decorative artist. Stage sets, stage costumes.

Symbolism, Futurism, Constructivism.

Groups: Golubaya Roza (Blue Rose), Bubnovy Valet (Jack of Diamonds).

A student at the school of fine art in Kiev, Aleksandra Exter exhibited for the first time with the Blue Rose ( Golubaya Roza ) group in Moscow in 1907. The following year, in Kiev, she organised one of the first exhibitions of the Russian avant-garde, The Link (Zveno), which brought together Baranoff-Rossine, the Burlyuk brothers, Larionov, Goncharova, and Lentulov.

Between 1903 and 1914, Exter travelled extensively between Paris, Rome, Genoa, and Florence. The artist however spent long periods in Paris beginning as early as 1908. While in Paris, Exter joined the Cubist circle. In 1908, she married her cousin Nicolai Eugenovitch Exter, a wealthy lawyer. In Paris, she met Picasso, Apollinaire, and Max Jacob and came under the influence of first Herve Léger and then Sonia and Robert Delaunay....

Article

Malevich, Kazimir  

Troels Andersen

(Severinovich)

(b Kiev, Feb 26, 1878; d Leningrad [now St Petersburg], May 15, 1935).

Russian painter, printmaker, decorative artist and writer of Ukranian birth. One of the pioneers of abstract art, Malevich was a central figure in a succession of avant-garde movements during the period of the Russian revolutions of 1905 and 1917 and immediately after. The style of severe geometric abstraction with which he is most closely associated, Suprematism (see fig.), was a leading force in the development of Constructivism, the repercussions of which continued to be felt throughout the 20th century. His work was suppressed in Soviet Russia in the 1930s and remained little known during the following two decades. The reassessment of his reputation in the West from the mid-1950s was matched by the renewed influence of his work on the paintings of Ad Reinhardt and on developments such as Zero, Hard-edge painting and Minimalism.

Article

Malevich, Kazimir Severinovich  

Russian, 20th century, male.

Born 23 February 1878, in the Kiev region; died 15 May 1935, in Leningrad (now St Petersburg).

Painter (including gouache), draughtsman, printmaker, decorative artist, writer. Stage sets.

Symbolism, Cubo-Futurism, Constructivism, Suprematism, Non-Objectivity, Abstract Art.

Oslinyy Khvost (Donkey’s Tail), Bubnovy Valet (Jack of Diamonds), Soyuz Molodezhi (Union of Youth), INKhUK (Institute of Artistic Culture)...

Article

Matyushin, Mikhail  

Christina Lodder

(Vasil’yevich)

(b Nizhny Novgorod, 1861; d Leningrad [now St Petersburg], Oct 14, 1934).

Russian painter, patron, musician, writer and publisher. He pursued a highly original line of artistic thought and practice and developed an organic perception of the world, deriving his inspiration from nature rather than machines, unlike many of his Russian Constructivist contemporaries.

Matyushin trained initially as a musician at the Moscow Conservatory (1878–81) and played the violin in the Court orchestra in St Petersburg from 1881 to 1913. In 1889 he began to attend the School of the Society for the Encouragement of the Arts in St Petersburg, where he studied painting with Yan Tsionglinsky (d 1914). In Tsionglinsky’s studio he met the artist and writer Yelena Guro, whom he married. Later (1906–8) he studied with the World of Art (Mir Iskusstva) painters Léon Bakst and Mstislav Dobuzhinsky at the Zvantseva School of Art in St Petersburg.

In 1909 Matyushin briefly joined the circle around Nikolay Kul’bin and the following year he founded the ...

Article

Morandi, Giorgio  

Piero Pacini

(b Bologna, July 20, 1890; d Bologna, June 18, 1964).

Italian painter, draughtsman and printmaker. At the age of 17 he enrolled at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Bologna and discovered contemporary art in books on Impressionism, Paul Cézanne, Georges Seurat and Henri Rousseau. He read with interest the articles by Ardengo Soffici in La voce and saw the Venice Biennale of 1910, where he first came across the painting of Auguste Renoir. During this period he often went to Florence to study the works of Giotto, Masaccio and Paolo Uccello. Between 1911 and 1914, when he was in Rome, he was impressed by the work of Claude Monet and, especially, Paul Cézanne. At the Futurist exhibition Lacerba, held in the Libreria Gonnelli, Florence, in 1913–14, he met Umberto Boccioni. Shortly afterwards he showed his first paintings at the Albergo Baglioni in Bologna and the Galleria Sprovieri in Rome. When he was not painting, he taught drawing in primary schools. As an adolescent he associated with those most receptive to new ideas in Bologna, including the painter Osvaldo Licini and the writer Mario Bacchelli. In ...

Article

Schadl, János  

Hungarian, 20th century, male.

Born 1892; died 1944.

Painter, draughtsman. Nudes, landscapes.

János Schadl studied in Budapest. He was initially influenced by Expressionism, Cubism and Futurism, then moved towards Naturalism.

Budapest (Magyar Nemzeti Gal.): St Sebastian (1918, Indian ink)

Pécs (Janus Pannonius Mus.): ...

Article

Sironi, Mario  

Emily Braun

(b Sassari, Sardinia, May 12, 1885; d Milan, Aug 13, 1961).

Italian painter, sculptor, architect, stage designer and illustrator. He was brought up in Rome where his family moved in 1886. In 1902 Sironi enrolled in the Engineering Faculty of the University of Rome, but after a long illness abandoned his studies to devote himself to painting. In 1903 he attended the Scuola Libera del Nudo at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Rome and frequented the studio of Giacomo Balla. Following a short spell in Milan in 1905–6, he travelled to Paris in 1906 and shared a room with his close friend Umberto Boccioni. Several family and self-portraits painted in a divisionist technique (see Divisionism) date from this period. Sironi also visited Germany several times between 1908 and 1911, where he was exposed to contemporary Expressionist currents. He lived in Rome from 1909 until he moved to Milan in late 1914 or early 1915.

Sironi experimented with Futurism from ...

Article

Soffici, Ardengo  

Piero Pacini

(b Rignano sull’Arno, nr Florence, April 7, 1879; d Forte dei Marmi, Lucca, Aug 18, 1964).

Italian painter, critic and writer. He spent his early childhood in the Florentine countryside and showed a precocious interest in drawing and literature. At school in Florence he deepened his knowledge of the Classics and also developed an interest in the new French poetry (from Laforgue to Rimbaud). At the Accademia in Florence he met Giovanni Fattori and Telemaco Signorini; in 1897, at the Arte e fiori exhibition, he admired paintings by Pierre Bonnard, Pierre Puvis de Chavannes and Giovanni Segantini.

Interest aroused by the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1900 persuaded Soffici to travel to the French capital in November 1900 with his friends the painters Giovanni Costetti (1878–1949) and Umberto Brunelleschi (1879–1949). His living conditions, which included a period in Ruche, La, were difficult. In order to make money he worked on popular satirical magazines such as La Plume, Sans-gêne and Assiette au beurre...

Article

Willink, Carel or Albert Carel  

Dutch, 20th century, male.

Born 7 March 1900, in Amsterdam; died 1983, in Amsterdam.

Painter, engraver, draughtsman. Figures, scenes with figures, urban landscapes, architectural views.

Constructivism, Futurism, Symbolism, Magic Realism.

Carel Willink studied architecture at the royal institute of engineering in Delft between 1918 and 1920. He then went on to study under Hans Baluschek in Berlin, living there between 1920 and 1923 and mixing with members of ...