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Article

Canadian, 19th century, male.

Born 2 November 1828, in St Andrews (New Brunswick); died 9 January 1901, in Providence (Rhode Island).

Painter, draughtsman, watercolourist, engraver, photographer. Portraits, religious subjects, genre scenes, landscapes, seascapes, still-lifes.

Bannister's father was form Barbados and his mother was Scottish. He was born in Canada right after slavery was abolished. He went to live in New York were he was a sailor and settled in Boston in ...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Active mid-19th century.

Draughtsman, lithographer, photographer.

Article

Bertall  

French, 19th century, male.

Born 18 December 1820, in Paris; died 24 March 1883, in Soyons (Ardèche).

Draughtsman, engraver (wood), lithographer, illustrator, photographer.

Albert d'Arnoux elected to paint under this pseudonym at the suggestion of Honoré de Balzac. He emerged as one of the most prolific illustrators of the second half of the 19th century but, although his drawings are amusing, they lack any distinctive personality. He was chosen by the publishing house Barba to illustrate popular editions of the works of Fenimore Cooper, Paul de Kock, Pigault-Lebrun and others, and is reputed to have engraved some 3,600 plates for Barba alone. Bertall also furnished numerous comic illustrations for magazines such as ...

Article

Antoine Terrasse

(b Fontenay-aux-Roses, nr Paris, Oct 3, 1867; d Le Cannet, Jan 27, 1947).

French painter, printmaker and photographer. He is known particularly for the decorative qualities of his paintings and his individual use of colour. During his life he was associated with other artists, Edouard Vuillard being a good friend, and he was a member of the Nabis.

Bonnard spent some of his childhood at Grand-Lemps in the Isère, where his family owned a house surrounded by a large park. There was a farm adjoining the house, and from an early age he developed a love of nature and animals. After obtaining the baccalauréat at 18, he enrolled in the Law faculty in order to please his father, who wanted him to have a steady job. He graduated when he was 21, and he was sworn in as a barrister in 1889. In the meantime he was already drawing and painting, having enrolled at the Académie Julian, Paris, in 1887. In an attractive ...

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Born 1 September 1814, in London; died February 1896, in Brentford.

Watercolourist, lithographer, photographer. Railways, landscapes.

John Cooke Bourne was a pupil of the landscape engraver John Pye and was influenced by the watercolours of Thomas Girton and John Sell Cotman. At the age of 22, Bourne began sketching the construction work of the London and Birmingham Railway which was underway near his home in North London. The writer John Britton encouraged Bourne to translate his watercolours into lithographs, and in ...

Article

Jocelyn Fraillon Gray

(b Morges, Vaud, Mar 3, 1814; d Melbourne, Victoria, May 30, 1888).

Swiss painter, lithographer, and photographer, active in Brazil and Australia. He attended a drawing school in Lausanne, where his teacher may have been Marc-Louis Arlaud (1772–1845), and is thought to have spent some time with the landscape painter Camille Flers in Paris c. 1836 en route to Bahia (Salvador), Brazil. In 1840 he moved to Rio de Janeiro, where he established himself as a painter of local views and exhibited with the Academia Imperial das Belas Artes, Rio. His Brazilian landscapes, of which the View of Gamboa (1852; Rio de Janeiro, Mus. N. B.A.) is an example, received critical acclaim for their vivacious lighting. As a photographer he fulfilled commissions in daguerreotype for Emperor Peter II, and with the figure painter Auguste Moreau he produced a set of eighteen lithographs, Picturesque Rio de Janeiro, published in 1843–1844. From 1852 to 1864 he worked as a portrait photographer in Switzerland and from ...

Article

Swiss, 19th century, male.

Born 1810, in Geneva; died 1876, in Geneva.

Painter, engraver, photographer.

Chomel attended art schools in Geneva and also studied under Détalla and Auguste Bovet. He often exhibited in his native city and left behind pictures of military scenes kept by the Rath museum. Chomel held the post of president of Geneva's administrative council and was a member of the arts council....

Article

Geneviève Monnier

(b Paris, July 19, 1834; d Paris, Sept 27, 1917).

French painter, draughtsman, printmaker, sculptor, pastellist, photographer and collector. He was a founder-member of the Impressionist group and the leader within it of the Realist tendency. He organized several of the group’s exhibitions, but after 1886 he showed his works very rarely and largely withdrew from the Parisian art world. As he was sufficiently wealthy, he was not constricted by the need to sell his work, and even his late pieces retain a vigour and a power to shock that is lacking in the contemporary productions of his Impressionist colleagues.

The eldest son of a Parisian banking family, he originally intended to study law, registering briefly at the Sorbonne’s Faculté de Droit in 1853. He began copying the 15th- and 16th-century Italian works in the Musée du Louvre and in 1854 he entered the studio of Louis Lamothe (1822–69). The training that Lamothe, who had been a pupil of Ingres, transmitted to Degas was very much in the classical tradition; reinforced by the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, which he attended in ...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 19 July 1834, in Paris, France; died 26 September 1917, in Paris.

Painter, pastellist, sculptor, printmaker (monotypes, etchings, aquatints, lithographs), draughtsman, photographer. History painting, figures, nudes, portraits, genre scenes, interiors with figures, sporting subjects.

Japonisme.

Impressionist group.

Hilaire Germain Edgar Degas was born in Paris into a well-to-do banking family. His father, whose family originated from Breton nobility, was born in Naples and his Creole mother, Célestine Musson, was born in New Orleans. She died in 1847 when Degas was 13 years old. His grandfather (who had left France at the time of the French Revolution) and his father always signed their names ‘de Gas’, a usage that Edgar continued until about 1870. He only signed works when he sold or exhibited them, and after his death, the executors of his estate stamped red signatures on all the works in his studio. Degas rarely dated his works....

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 6 April 1857, in Ipswich (Massachusetts); died 13 December 1922, in New York.

Painter, engraver (wood), draughtsman, designer, illustrator, potter, photographer. Landscapes.

Arthur Wesley Dow studied in Worcester with the painter Anna K. Freeland, then in Boston in the studio of the painter James M. Stone. In 1884 he travelled to Paris, where he was a pupil of Boulanger and of Lefebvre at the Académie Julian. On returning to Boston in 1889, he studied Aztec, Oceanian, African, Egyptian and, above all, Japanese art. In 1893 he became assistant curator of Japanese art at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. In the 1890s Dow became an avid photographer and made photographs as studies and as works of art. The majority of his photographs are of the landscape around Ipswich and botanical subjects. He printed most often in cyanotype, which renders the image in bright shades of blue and reveals Dow’s interest in tonality. For example, Dory (1904) explores the transitions between low-lying marsh grass and still water in an arrangement inspired by the Japanese woodblock prints he admired....

Article

Nancy E. Green

(b Ipswich, MA, April 6, 1857; d New York, NY, Dec 13, 1922).

American painter, printmaker, photographer, writer and teacher. Dow took art classes in the Boston studio of James M. Stone, where he met Frank Duveneck, who would remain a lifelong friend. He went to Paris in 1884 to study at the Académie Julian with Jules(-Joseph) Lefebvre and Gustave(-Clarence-Rodolphe) Boulanger. Dow also took evening classes at the Ecole des Arts Décoratifs, where the American artist Francis D. Millet (1846–1912) offered critiques of the students’ work. Dow then spent some time in Pont-Aven, where he met Paul Gauguin and Emile Bernard, and in Concarneau where he sought out the advice of American painter Alexander Harrison (1853–1930). Dow’s painting Au Soir won an honorable mention at the Universal Exposition in 1889 and two of his paintings were accepted that same year for the Paris Salon and were hung on the line (i.e. at eye-level).

Dow returned to Boston where he began independent studies at the Boston Public Library that led him to the work of Japanese artists ...

Article

American, 19th–20th century, male.

Active in Germany from 1906.

Born 19 September 1865, in New York City; died 16 December 1936, in Munich, Germany.

Painter, photographer, etcher, draughtsman.Portraits, figures, landscapes, animals.

Pictorialism.

Photo-Secession, The Linked Ring.

Frank Eugene began his artistic career as a painter before devoting himself to photography in the Pictorial style. Eugene studied painting in New York in ...

Article

Latvian, 20th century, male.

Born 24 October 1962, in Riga, Latvian SSR (now Latvia).

Painter, graphic artist, multimedia artist. Allegorical subjects, abstraction and portraiture. Sculptural objects, conceptual installations.

Of the generation that came of age during Latvia’s transition from Soviet occupation to political independence, Kristaps Ģelzis distinguished himself as the most cerebral of that nation’s artists while, paradoxically, anchoring his work in intrinsic properties of base materials, the timelessness of simple forms, and labour-intensive craft. The son and younger brother of renowned architects, Ģelzis resolved to pursue another creative vocation, first studying violin while attending Riga’s 50th Secondary School, then taking preparatory classes for the Latvian Art Academy in lieu of attending the art high school. As a student in the academy’s department of graphic art ...

Article

Swiss, 19th century, male.

Born 17 March 1825, in Lausanne; died 7 January 1902, in Lausanne.

Painter, engraver, photographer. Landscapes.

Article

G. Lola Worthington

(b San Francisco, CA, Oct 5, 1937).

Native American (Maidu–Wintu) painter, printmaker, photographer, writer, educator, traditional dancer and poet. LaPena, also known as Tauhindauli, spent time with the Nomtipom Wintu and other regional neighboring elders to conserve and regain traditional cultural practices. He was taught traditional tribal songs, dances and ceremonial rituals of Northern California Native American culture that inspired his interest in reviving and preserving Northern California tribal culture and accompanying performance arts. His work, along with Frank Day (1902–76), a late Maidu elder and painter, aided the founding of the Maidu Dancers and Traditionalists, a group dedicated to carrying out traditional cultural forms and social practices. Earning his bachelor’s degree from California State University (CSU), Chico (1965), and an Anthropology Masters of Arts degree from CSU, Sacramento (1978), he taught for the next 30 years in the CSU, Sacramento American Indian Studies program.

For LaPena, his art was a spiritual act, which empowers the maker with an opportunity to achieve a stronger sense of understanding life. Inspired by prehistoric rock painting, some painted images are depicted in total abstraction, while others illustrate a narrative theme. His strong consciousness of his Californian Native American heritage is distinctive and many themes in his compositions provide a powerful commentary in their depiction of the struggles of Northern California Native Americans; “To let the world know what happened in California, and to the indigenous populations points out that survival issues are still of great concern.” His paintings and prints reached a popular acceptance. LaPena exhibited throughout the United States and internationally at the Wheelwright Museum, Santa Fe, NM, the Chicago Art Institute, the San Francisco Museum, the Linder Museum, Stuttgart, the American Arts Gallery, New York, the George G. Heye Center of the Smithsonian, New York, and numerous galleries. In ...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 1818, in Paris; died 1882.

Painter, engraver (etching), photographer. Genre scenes.

Henri Le Secq was a pupil of James Pradier for sculpture, then of the painters Paul Delaroche and Granger. Through them he met Gustave Le Gray with whom he took up photography around ...

Article

Eugenia Parry Janis

(b Paris, Aug 18, 1818; d Paris, Dec 26, 1882).

French photographer, painter, printmaker, and collector. After studying with the sculptor James Pradier and the painters Jean-Pierre Granger (1779–1840) and Paul Delaroche, he made his début at the Salon of 1842, winning a third-class medal there in 1845. He turned to photography in the wave of self-enrichment preceding the 1848 Revolution. With Charles Nègre he experimented with the waxed paper negative process of (Jean-Baptiste-)Gustave Le Gray, from whom he probably received personal instruction before 1850. Unlike other photographers, who later adopted glass negatives, Le Secq continued to use paper, at first employing photographs as studies for his genre paintings.

By 1851 Le Secq excelled at rendering ancient and medieval monuments in a pictorial style that exploited the effects of light and shadow, turning architecture into symbolic fragments evoking a rapidly disappearing historical past, which Le Secq sought to save photographically. After helping found the Société Héliographique in 1851...

Article

Polish, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in Germany.

Born 23 May 1874, in Drohobycz (Galicia, Ukraine); died 17 June 1925, in Brunswick.

Painter, engraver (etching), illustrator, book designer, photographer. Religious subjects, scenes with figures, landscapes with figures.

Ephraïm Lilien was apprenticed to a sign painter before studying at the school of fine art, Cracow, under the painter Matejko from 1890 to 1892, after which he returned to his home town to work as a commercial painter. Lacking the means to enroll at the Vienna Academy, in 1899 he settled in Berlin, where he became friends with Börries von Münchhausen. With other figures from the Zionist Congress of 1901 he founded the publishing house Jüdischer Verlag in 1902, publishing a great many works of art and literature on the Jewish Renaissance. Also in 1902 he published the ...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Active in the USA.

Born 1810, in Paris; died 9 January 1866, in New Orleans (Louisiana), USA.

Lithographer, painter, photographer. Portraits, city scenes, landscapes.

Jules Lion exhibited lithographs at the Paris Salon from 1831 to 1836. He arrived in New Orleans in ...

Article

Geoffrey Belknap

(b Paris, c. 1816; d New Orleans, LA, Jan 9, 1866).

African American lithographer, daguerreotypist, and painter of French birth. Lion was born in Paris and trained as an artist in France before moving to the United States in 1837. He is noted as the first African American to adopt the daguerreotype method, and one of the first daguerreotypists active in the United States. For much of his life, Lion resided in New Orleans and operated his photographic studios in the city. He was active as a photographer for a relatively short period of time—between 1840 and 1845—and because of this only a small number of his views of New Orleans streets remain, primarily in the form of lithographic prints made from daguerreotypes (now presumed lost). In addition to making his lithographic copies, Lion gained notoriety in New Orleans for offering lectures and exhibitions of the daguerreotype process following the announcement of its invention. After leaving photography behind in 1845...