1-20 of 21 Results  for:

  • Prints and Printmaking x
  • Painting and Drawing x
  • Textiles and Embroidery x
  • Interior Design and Furniture x
Clear all

Article

Albers, Anni  

maiden name: Fleischmann

German, 20th century, female.

Active in the USA.

Born 12 June 1899, in Berlin; died 10 May 1994, in Orange (Connecticut), USA.

Draughtswoman, textile designer, printmaker.

Having studied in Berlin and Hamburg, Anni Albers went on to study at the Bauhaus from 1922 to 1930. She married Josef Albers and became an assistant teacher at a weaving workshop. In 1933, the two emigrated to the USA, founding the art department at Black Mountain College, a newly established liberal arts school in North Carolina. In 1949, Anni and Josef moved to New Haven (Connecticut) where he served as chair for the design department at Yale University.

As early on as her first teaching post at the Bauhaus, where she ran technical classes, she taught students to combine natural and synthetic materials in weaving, saying: ‘The material determines its own limits in the face of the tasks imposed by the imagination.’ After emigrating to the USA, she continued to teach this philosophy at Black Mountain College and was thus part of the considerable influence exerted by the college on the artistic movement that would go on to become the American School of the 1940s. Challenging historical distinctions between high and low art forms, she carved out space for fibre arts within the discourse of fine art. Her pedagogical approach not only integrated art, craft, and industry, but also emphasised the cultivation of moral character, self-sufficiency, and independence from machinery....

Article

Behrens, Peter  

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 14 April 1868, in Hamburg; died 27 February 1940, in Berlin.

Painter, draughtsman, engraver, architect, designer, decorative artist, graphic designer. Posters, furniture, wallpaper, carpets, glassware, ceramics, table services, jewellery, silverwork, objets d'art, typefaces.

Jugendstil, functional school.

Die Sieben (Group of Seven), Deutscher Werkbund...

Article

Bertholle, Jean  

French, 20th century, male.

Born 26 June 1909, in Dijon; died 6 December 1996, in Paris.

Painter, collage artist, engraver, draughtsman. Wall decorations, designs for mosaics, stained glass windows, tapestries, stage costumes and sets.

A pupil at the École des Beaux-Arts in Lyons in 1930, Bertholle studied in Paris from 1932-1934, and subsequently attended classes run by the painter Roger Bissière at the Académie Ranson, where he met his friends and associates Manessier, Etienne-Martin, Le Moal and Véra Pagava. He was artistic director of the Gien porcelain factory from 1943-1957, and taught at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris from 1965-1980. He was a member of the Institut de France, a Chevalier of the Légion d'Honneur and a Commander of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. Initially an admirer of Puvis de Chavannes, whose work he had encountered at the city museum in Lyons, Bertholle later discovered Manet (at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1932), and through the latter, Van Gogh and Renoir. Following his early, highly-coloured Expressionist period, Bertholle was greatly influenced by the Flemish fantasies of Breughel and Heironymus Bosch, and ultimately by the Surrealists - as may be seen in his painting of the ...

Article

Bicât, André  

British, 20th century, male.

Active in Crays Pond, near Reading.

Born 1909, in Essex; died November 1996, in London.

Painter, printmaker, sculptor, ceramicist, textile designer. Portraits, landscapes, urban landscapes.

London Group.

André Bicât was a self-taught artist. Born to French and Anglo-Irish parents, he worked as a theatre designer and scene painter in the 1930s. His theatre work included work for Mercury Theatre Productions in ...

Article

Campendonk, Heinrich  

German, 20th century, male.

Born 1889, in Krefeld; died 1957, in Amsterdam.

Painter (including gouache), watercolourist, pastellist, engraver (wood), decorative designer. Figure compositions, figures, nudes, rustic scenes, landscapes, landscapes with figures, architectural views, still-lifes, animals. Stage sets, designs for stained glass, glass painting, designs for fabrics...

Article

Camus, Maurice Jacques Yvan  

French, 20th century, male.

Born 15 October 1893, in Angers.

Engraver, illustrator, painter, decorative designer. Designs for carpets, designs (wallpapers/fabrics).

Maurice Camus studied with Claudio Castellucho at the latter's Académie de Montparnasse and also under Lucien Simon. During a visit to Palermo in 1919, he painted decorative compositions for the Casa Florio. He exhibited at the Salon d'Automne in Paris and was made a member in ...

Article

Cauvy, Léon  

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 12 January 1874, in Montpellier; died 1933, in Algiers.

Painter (including gouache), engraver, decorative artist. Genre scenes, figures, landscapes, landscapes with figures. Designs for carpets, designs (furniture).

Orientalism.

School of Algiers.

Léon Cauvy studied under Albert Maignan and exhibited at the Paris Salon as of 1901. He served as principal of the École des Beaux-Arts in Algiers from 1909 to 1933. Cauvy was a member of the Société du Salon des Artistes Français from 1906 onwards. He was awarded a silver medal in 1911, following which he exhibited out of competition. He was made a Chevalier of the Légion d'Honneur in 1926....

Article

Christiansen, Hans  

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active also active in France.

Born 6 March 1866, in Flensburg; died 5 January 1945, in Wiesbaden.

Painter, engraver, draughtsman, decorative designer, graphic designer. Portraits, landscapes, urban landscapes, still-lifes, flowers, decorative motifs. Designs for carpets, designs (furniture/posters/jewellery/book-binding).

Jugendstil.

Die Sieben (Group of Seven)...

Article

Cortot, Jean  

French, 20th century, male.

Born 14 February 1925, in Alexandria, Egypt.

Painter, engraver, illustrator, graphic designer. Posters, wall decorations, designs for tapestries, designs for carpets.

From 1942, Jean Cortot studied under Othon Friesz at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière, and together with Busse, Calmettes, Patrix and others, was a co-founder of the ...

Article

Dugourc, Jean Démosthène  

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1749, in Versailles; died 1825, in Paris.

Painter (including gouache), watercolourist, sculptor, draughtsman (wash), engraver, decorative artist. Mythological subjects, allegorical subjects, historical portraits, hunting scenes, interiors with figures, gardens. Stage costumes and sets, furniture, designs for fabrics, frontispieces.

Dugourc's father, who was in the service of the Duke of Orléans, had a considerable fortune. Dugourc was permitted to attend the lessons taken by the Duke of Chartres (the future Philippe-Égalité), and at the age 15 left for Rome, attached to the embassy of the Count of Cani. From his infancy, he had shown an aptitude for drawing, perspective and architecture. However, the death of his mother, followed shortly after by the loss of his father's fortune, changed his life. From being an amateur, Dugourc became a professional artist, and executed paintings, sculptures and engravings. In a work published in ...

Article

Eckmann, Otto  

German, 19th century, male.

Born 19 November 1865, in Hamburg; died 11 June 1902, in Badenweiler.

Painter, decorative artist, illustrator, engraver, designer, ceramicist, textile designer. Portraits, landscapes, flowers. Designs for stained glass, designs for tapestries, ex-libris plates, advertising posters, fabrics, ceramics, metal objects, ironware, lamps, furniture, typefaces, jewellery, wallpaper...

Article

Japonisme  

Phylis Floyd

French term used to describe a range of European borrowings from Japanese art. It was coined in 1872 by the French critic, collector and printmaker Philippe Burty ‘to designate a new field of study—artistic, historic and ethnographic’, encompassing decorative objects with Japanese designs (similar to 18th-century Chinoiserie), paintings of scenes set in Japan, and Western paintings, prints and decorative arts influenced by Japanese aesthetics. Scholars in the 20th century have distinguished japonaiserie, the depiction of Japanese subjects or objects in a Western style, from Japonisme, the more profound influence of Japanese aesthetics on Western art.

There has been wide debate over who was the first artist in the West to discover Japanese art and over the date of this discovery. According to Bénédite, Félix Bracquemond first came under the influence of Japanese art after seeing the first volume of Katsushika Hokusai’s Hokusai manga (‘Hokusai’s ten thousand sketches’, 1814) at the printshop of ...

Article

Jungnickel, Ludwig Heinrich  

German, 20th century, male.

Active then naturalised in 1918 in Austria.

Born 27 July 1881, in Wunsiedel (Upper Franconia); died 1965, in Vienna.

Painter, engraver (wood), draughtsman, illustrator, lithographer, watercolourist, illustrator. Figures, animals. Designs for carpets, designs (wallpapers).

Jugendstil.

Ludwig Heinrich Jungnickel studied at the Kunstgewerbeschule in Munich in 1896, and then, after his family moved to Austria, at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna in 1899, under the supervision of Christian Griepenkerl and August Eisenmenger. In Vienna, he worked for various design companies, producing designs for wallpaper and similar work, and starting his collaboration with the Wiener Werkstätte (Vienna Studio) in 1903. Around 1906, he completed his training at the Vienna Akademie der Bildenden Künste in graphic art, where he learned engraving with William Unger. He taught at the Kunstgewerbeschule in Frankfurt from 1911. He was a member of the Deutscher Werkbund. He formed a friendship with Egon Schiele and Kokoschka. He obtained Austrian nationality in 1918 and, between 1921 and 1930, travelled regularly to Italy, visiting Rome, Naples and Sicily. The Nazis banned him from practising his art and subjected him to persecution. He withdrew to Split in 1938. On returning to Austria in 1952, he was rehabilitated and received the title of professor, and his art was acclaimed....

Article

Leistikow, Walter  

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 25 October 1865, in Bromberg (now Bydgoszcz, Poland); died 24 July 1908, in Schlachtensee (Berlin).

Painter (including gouache), watercolourist, draughtsman, engraver, illustrator, decorative designer, writer. Landscapes, landscapes with figures, waterscapes. Posters, designs for carpets, designs for tapestries, designs (wallpapers/book-binding)...

Article

Meuwly, Raymond  

Swiss, 20th century, male.

Born 23 March 1920, in Lausanne; died 21 May 1981, in Fribourg.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman, lithographer, monotype artist, art restorer. Tapestry.

Raymond Meuwly served an apprenticeship as a builder's decorator and worked as assistant to Alexandre Cingria until his conscription into the armed services in ...

Article

Moralis, Yannis  

Fani-Maria Tsigakou

[Yiannis, Giannis]

(b Arta, April 23, 1916; d Athens, Dec 20, 2009).

Greek painter, printmaker, illustrator, stage designer and decorative artist. From 1931 to 1936 he studied painting and printmaking at the Higher School of Fine Arts in Athens under Konstantinos Parthenis and Yannis Kefallinos (1893–1957). As soon as he graduated he participated in the exhibition of Greek printmakers that was organized in Czechoslovakia in 1936. The same year, on a scholarship from the Academy of Athens, he went to Rome and then to Paris to study at the Ecole Supérieure des Beaux-Arts and the Ecole des Arts et Métiers. He returned to Athens in 1940, when he participated in the last pre-war panhellenic exhibition, in which he was awarded the first prize. During the period of the German occupation (1941–4) he started painting portraits to earn his living. In these his restricted palette and the opposition of light and shadow with as little half-tone as possible reveal his concern with the flattening of form and space. His post-war canvases are painted with a directness of execution and solidly modelled forms. His concern with the structure of form led him gradually to geometrical compositions. In ...

Article

Olbrich, Joseph Maria  

Austrian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 22 December 1867, in Troppau (now Opava in the Czech Republic); died 8 August 1908, in Düsseldorf.

Painter, architect, draughtsman, lithographer, decorative designer. Designs (objets d'art, furniture, decorative motifs, fabrics, jewellery, ceramic).

Vienna Secession, Wiener Werkstätte, Die Sieben (Group of Seven), Deutscher Werkbund...

Article

Oudot, Roland  

French, 20th century, male.

Born 29 July 1897, in Paris; died 10 July 1981, in Paris.

Painter (including gouache), watercolourist, draughtsman, engraver, illustrator. Mythological subjects, genre scenes, figures, local figures, portraits, landscapes, waterscapes, still-lifes, flowers. Wall decorations, stage costumes and sets, designs for fabrics, designs for tapestries, furniture...

Article

Rubens, Peter Paul  

Flemish School, 16th – 17th century, male.

Born 28 June 1577 , in Siegen (Westphalia), Germany; died 30 May 1640 , in Antwerp.

Painter, etcher, draughtsman. Historical subjects, figures, nudes, portraits, genre scenes, landscapes. Wall decorations, church decoration, ornaments, designs for tapestries.

Antwerp School.

Peter Pau(we)l Rubens came from a rich bourgeois family from Antwerp. His father, Jan Rubens (b. 13 March 1530, d. 1 March 1587 in Cologne, Germany), was a doctor of civil and canon law, an alderman in Antwerp, and a man of considerable culture who had lived in Italy for seven years. On 29 November 1561, he married Marie Pypelynckx (b. 20 March 1538, d. 15 November 1608 in Antwerp) and fathered seven children by her. Although he was born a Roman Catholic, Jan Rubens belonged to the Reformed (Calvinist) church. He campaigned against the tyranny of the Duke of Alba and, as a result, was obliged to flee the Low Countries in 1568, seeking refuge in Cologne. Following an affair with his employer’s second wife, the Protestant Princess Anna of Saxony, which resulted in a pregnancy, he was banished to Siegen in Westphalia. Rubens was finally allowed to return to Cologne after posting bail to the sum of 6,000 thalers, and on 15 May 1578, he settled his family into a modest house in which he was destined to spend the final nine years of his life - under constant surveillance by the agents of the House of Orange-Nassau. It was during this time that his son, Peter Paul Rubens, commenced his Jesuit education. In the interim, Jan Rubens had had a change of heart and, on his return from imprisonment, abjured Protestantism. On his death in 1587, he was buried at the St Peterskirche in Cologne. His wife, Marie, left Cologne in March 1589, a virtual pauper as a result of the vindictiveness of the House of Orange-Nassau, and returned to Antwerp with her children....

Article

Saint-Aubin, Charles Germain de  

French, 18th century, male.

Born 17 January 1721, in Paris; died 6 March 1786, in Paris.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman, engraver (etching), decorative designer. Genre scenes, interiors with figures, flowers. Designs (embroidery).

Charles de Saint-Aubin was firstly the pupil of his father, the embroiderer Gabriel-Germain de Saint-Aubin. He then worked in Dutro's studio, where he studied ornamental decoration. He worked with his father until ...