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Hannelore Hägele

(b Pfarrkirchen, Upper Bavaria, c. 1660; d Augsburg, Jan 31, 1738).

German sculptor. He was the son of the sculptor Johann Christian Bendl, with whom he trained. Having become a journeyman, he travelled for six years, probably to Bohemia and Venice. On his return he entered in 1684 the workshop in Augsburg of Johann Jakob Rill (fl c. 1686–99); on 26 November 1687 he was made a master and also became a citizen of Augsburg. He was the city’s leading sculptor during the late Baroque period; many important churches in and outside of Augsburg had sculptures by him. He worked mostly in wood, but also in stone, terracotta and stucco, and probably in ivory and metal as well. For jewellers and goldsmiths he produced models, such as a figure of St Sebastian (1714–15) and a crucifix (1716). His major work included two series of life-size statues: one, of the Apostles, for St Moritz and the other, of the ...

Article

Pedro Dias

[Manuel de Sousa]

(b Braga, c. 1650; d Tibães, 1716).

Portuguese sculptor. He was born to a family of craftsmen and later entered one of the many workshops of wood-carvers in Braga. In 1676, however, he entered the Benedictine order at its Portuguese mother house of Tibães, near Braga. Here he made statues and reliefs for the church of S Martinho. From this period date his St Benedict and St Gregory the Great and the relief of the Visitation, now in the Benedictine church, S Romão do Neiva. Between 1680 and 1683, during the abbotship of Frei João Osório, he made terracotta sculptures of the eight Virtues and the four Benedictine kings (Tibães, Sacristy), images that appear rather rigid and stereotyped.

Frei Cipriano da Cruz moved to Coimbra before July 1691, when it is recorded that he made the St Catherine in the chapel of the University of Coimbra. This contact with the main centre for sculpture in Portugal had a broadening effect on his art. His most important work outside Tibães is the group of serene and dignified sculptures (dispersed) that he made for the Colégio de S Bento (Benedict), Coimbra. This group includes his gilt and polychromed wooden ...

Article

Bohemian, 17th century, male.

Active in Prague.

Sculptor. Religious subjects.

Bohemian School.

Ernst Heidelberger was represented in the exhibition Light and Darkness. Baroque Art and Civilisation in Bohemia ( Lumière et ténèbres, art et civilisation du Baroque en Bohême) at the Palais des Beaux-Arts in Lille in ...

Article

(fl second half of 17th century).

Portuguese sculptor. He is associated with a school of sculpture that flourished in the second half of the 17th century and was based in the Cistercian abbey of Sta Maria, Alcobaça (see Alcobaça Abbey, §1), the largest foundation of this order in Portugal. It is known from chronicles by authors living in the abbey that the White Friars were responsible for the sculpture decorating their buildings and that their workshop supplied statues for other public institutions as well as for commissions from private individuals, such as Dom António Alvares da Cunha, Lord of Tábua, who became a patron in 1678. It is not possible to attribute any specific group of statues to Frei Pedro, but contemporary documents indicate that he was the leading artist and head of the workshop at Alcobaça towards the end of the 17th century. One relief attributed to him, depicting the Death of St Bernard...

Article

German, 17th century, male.

Died 1691, in Constance.

Sculptor. Religious subjects.

Schenck, whose work had certain similarities with Baroque, was inspired by the traditions of mannerism, which prevailed in the region of Lake Constance. Particularly notable is the powerful musculature of his figures carved in wood....

Article

(b Deggendorf, May 8, 1710; d Hildesheim, April 11, 1781).

German painter and sculptor. Formerly thought to be the brother of Johann Christian Thomas Winck, he in fact acquired his surname from a stepfather. Nor was he the grandfather of the sculptor Friedrich Carl Franz Winck (1796–1859). He probably started his training in Augsburg—his antecedents lie in south German late Baroque—and may have served his apprenticeship and journeyman years in Holland. He was in Mannheim in 1743 and then worked in Hildesheim, providing an allegorical ceiling painting (1743–4, 1752–3; destr.) for the renovated Rittersaal in the cathedral, and in Brunswick, where he executed a stucco relief for the main gable of the opera house (1747–8; destr. 1864).

Winck married in 1753 in Hildesheim and executed commissions for its prince-bishop during the following years. The Legend of St Clement (c. 1755–8) on the ceiling of the chapel of Schloss Liebenburg (Goslar) is one of his most mature works. Although it is painted on a flat ceiling, perspective is used to give the illusion of a vault, with standing figures from scenes relating to the saint’s life encircling his apotheosis in the centre of the picture and forming the edge of the apparent vault. The apse is painted with illusionistic architectural features, and the altarpiece shows the ...