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Article

Lisa M. Binder

(b Anyako, Ghana, June 13, 1944).

Ghanaian sculptor, active in Nigeria. He earned a bachelor’s degree in sculpture (1968) and a postgraduate diploma in art education from the University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana (1969). After graduation he taught at the Specialist Training College (now University of Winneba), Ghana, in a position vacated by the eminent sculptor Vincent Kofi. From 1975 he was Professor of Sculpture at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Anatsui’s practice often makes use of found objects including bottle caps, milk-tins and cassava graters. However, he is not concerned with recycling or salvaging; instead he seeks meaning in the ways materials can be transformed to make statements about history, culture and memory.

His early work consists of ceramic sculptures manipulated to reconfigure pieces of memory. In 1978 he began his Broken Pots series, which was exhibited the following year at the British Council in Enugu, Nigeria. Several of the ceramic works were made of sherds that were fused together by a grog-like cement of broken pieces. Making art historical references to ...

Article

John-Paul Stonard

(b Merseyside, June 23, 1966).

English sculptor and conceptual artist. She studied at Kingston Polytechnic, Surrey (1986–9), and at Goldsmiths’ College of Art in London (1992–3). She had her first solo exhibition at City Racing, London, in 1994, and in the following year was included in General Release: Young British Artists at the XLVI Venice Biennale. Banner came to prominence with her ‘wordscapes’, large text works that recount the plots of feature films or other events. The first of these was Top Gun (pencil on paper, 2.13×4.57 m, 1993), a hand-written account of the film Top Gun presented on a cinematic scale. The ‘wordscapes’ led to the publication in 1997 of The Nam, 1000 pages of continuous text describing the Vietnam war movies Apocalypse Now, Born on the Fourth of July, Full Metal Jacket, Platoon, Hamburger Hill and The Deer Hunter. This unreadable text points to the excess of violence in such films, the numbing of critical faculties, as well as the mythologizing and fictionalizing framing devices used to interpret historical events. Towards the end of the 1990s she became interested in the implications of punctuation signs, dwelling on their qualities as abstract marks that give structure to text. By selecting a variety of fonts, enlarging the full stop signs to ...

Article

Argentinian, 20th century, male.

Painter, sculptor, mixed media, architect.

Bedel's works are metaphorical. In relief to varying degrees, he combines shiny metal with dull organic materials to create models that resemble towns, while privileging the evocation of the book form. He gives poetic expression to his pessimistic preoccupations concerning the future of humanity....

Article

Morgan Falconer

(b Lahore, 1962; d London, Sept 1994).

British sculptor of Pakistani birth. He studied at Goldsmiths College, London (1987–90). After initially working in a wide variety of media, Butt settled exclusively on installations in the late 1980s. Because of his early death little of his work has become widely known, but that which has demonstrates by an interest in alchemy and a thematic preoccupation with seduction, pleasure and danger. Transmission (1990; see 1995 exh. cat., p. 65) comprises a circle of objects that look like open books, resting on the floor. The glass pages reveal a triffid motif that is lit by dangerous ultra-violet light. The series Familiars includes some of his best-known work and is concerned with the dichotomy between physical impurity and divine grace. It also derives from his interest in chemical properties, each of the three parts employing a different member of the chemical family of halogens: Substance Sublimation Unit (1992; see 1995 exh. cat., pp. 72–3) employs iodine confined in tubes set up in a ladder formation (the form was inspired by the mythical Santa Scala, or Holy Ladder of Perfection); ...

Article

British, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1966, in Nottingham.

Installation artist, video artist, photographer, sculptor. Multimedia.

Young British Artists.

Mat Collishaw studied at Nottingham Trent Polytechnic from 1985 to 1986, and at Goldsmiths College, London from 1986 to 1989. He held a residency at the Camden Arts Centre ...

Article

British, 20th – 21st century, female.

Active in London.

Born 1963, in Paisley, near Glasgow.

Sculptor, installation artist.

Ephemeral material.

Anya Gallaccio studied at the Kingston Polytechnic (1984-1985) and at Goldsmith’s College in London (1985-1988). In 1998 she was awarded the Sargent Fellowship by the British School in Rome. She was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in ...

Article

Native American (Choctaw, Cherokee), 20th-21st century, male.

Born 31 March 1972, in Colorado.

Painter, sculptor, mixed-media artist.

Jeffrey Gibson received a BFA from the Art Institute of Chicago (1995) and an MFA from the Royal College of Art (1998), which was funded by his tribal group, the Mississippi Band of the Choctaw Nation. Since ...

Article

Austrian, 20th century, male.

Born 1936, in Villach.

Sculptor, painter, installation artist, draughtsman.

Bruno Gironcoli first studied to be a goldsmith in Innsbruck, then followed courses in fine arts from 1957 until 1959, and decorative arts from 1960 until 1962, at the academy in Vienna. He then spent two years in Paris. He lives and works in Vienna, where he has taught at the school of decorative arts and the art college since ...

Article

Octavia Nicholson

(Steven)

(b Bristol, June 7, 1965).

English sculptor, installation artist, painter, and printmaker. He was a leading figure in the group of ‘Young British Artists’ who emerged, predominantly in London, in the 1990s. He studied at Goldsmiths’ College, London (1986–9), and in 1988 curated the exhibition Freeze, which provided a new platform to show his own work and that of many of his Goldsmiths’ contemporaries, some of whom have since become internationally renowned. His works are explicitly concerned with the fundamental dilemmas of human existence; his constant themes have included the fragility of life, society’s reluctance to confront death, and the nature of love and desire, often clothed in titles which exist somewhere between the naive and the disingenuous. The works typically make use of media that challenge conventional notions of high art and aesthetic value and subject-matter that critiques the values of late 20th-century culture.

Dead animals are frequently used in Hirst’s installations, forcing viewers to consider their own and society’s attitudes to death. Containers such as aquariums and vitrines are also hallmarks of his work; reflecting the formal influence of Minimalism and certain sculptures by Jeff Koons, they are used as devices to impose control on the fragile subject-matter contained within them and as barriers between the viewer and the viewed. ...

Article

Andrew Cross

(b London, May 13, 1963).

English sculptor, installation artist and draughtsman. After completing his BFA at Loughborough College of Art in 1983, he returned to London to take an MFA at Goldsmiths’ College in London (1985–8); his fellow students included Damien Hirst, Gary Hume and Sarah Lucas on the BFA course. He showed with other Goldsmiths’ graduates in the exhibitions Freeze I (London, Surrey Docks, 1988) and East Country Yard Show (London, 1990). His work at this time combined a formalism with a realist aesthetic: vast installations mimicking Minimalist sculpture but employing the materials and vernacular of street market stalls, including Market (installed London, Building One, 1990). Accompanied by video footage of actual street markets, the work indicated Landy’s concerns with the value of commodity exchange and production as well as with the interplay between materiality in art (with a nod to the Minimalism of Donald Judd and Sol LeWitt) and an aesthetic based on everyday activities. The social relations present in the processes of production and exchange continued to inform installations such as ...

Article

John-Paul Stonard

(b Penzance, 1967).

English sculptor and installation artist. She studied at Bristol Polytechnic (1985–6) and Goldsmiths’ College, London (1986–9). She had her first solo exhibition, Abigail Lane: Making History, at Karsten Schubert, London, in 1992. Lane’s work of the early 1990s dealt with the presentation of bodily traces as forensic evidence. For her installation Bottom Wallpaper (exh. Lucerne, Ksthalle, 1992) she papered the gallery walls with a repeating pattern of female bottom-prints, the space also containing a chair whose seat had been converted into a large blue ink-pad; a smaller version of this work, Blue Print (1992; London, Saatchi Gal.), consists of a single chair facing one framed print of this type. Wallpaper was used again in the exhibition Skin of the Teeth (London, ICA, 1995), this time with a motif of bloody hand-prints and drips, based on a police photograph of a murder scene. The space contained other objects, such as a Jack Russell terrier petrified in cement and cast body parts hanging from the ceiling, forming an unsettling and highly suggestive scene. The uncanny (...

Article

John-Paul Stonard

(b London, Oct 23, 1962).

English sculptor, installation artist and photographer. She studied in London at the Working Men’s College (1982–3), London College of Printing (1983–4), and Goldsmiths’ College (1984–7) and emerged as one of the major Young British Artists during the 1990s, with a body of highly provocative work. In the early 1990s she began using furniture as a substitute for the human body, usually with crude genital punning. In works such as Bitch (table, t-shirt, melons, vacuum-packed smoked fish, 1995; see exh. cat., 1996, pp. 54–5), she merges low-life misogynist tabloid culture with the economy of the ready-made, with the intention of confronting sexual stereotyping. As with earlier works in which she had displayed enlarged pages from the Sunday Sport newspaper, the intention was to attack stereotyping on its own ground, using a base language given critical viability by an affinity to previous movements such as Situationism and Surrealism. She is also known for her confrontational self-portraits, such as ...

Article

Catherine M. Grant

(b Düsseldorf, Dec 27, 1965).

German sculptor, painter and installation artist, active in Wales. She studied Fine Art at Goldsmiths’ College, London (1987–90), before going on to study for an MA in Sculpture at Chelsea College of Art and Design, London (1991–2). Her work in the mid-1990s focused on modelling small three-dimensional recreations of paintings by German Romantic artists such as Caspar David Friedrich, contained in glass tanks which were filled with saline solution and dye to reproduce the dramatic sunsets and skies. Neudecker accentuated the kitsch fantasy of these landscapes, making the imagined mountains and hills ‘real’ as objects, albeit in miniature form. The Sea of Ice 1997; Eastbourne, Towner A.G. & Local Hist. Mus.) is typical of these works. The associations with German history, and in particular with Hitler’s appropriation of Romanticism, forms a cultural backdrop to these landscapes that unsettles the innocent, childlike imagery. Maps are another important motif in Neudecker’s exploration of the ways in which cultural identity is affected by personal conceptions of geography and history. In an ongoing project initiated in ...

Article

British, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1958, in London.

Painter (mixed media), sculptor of assemblages.

New British Sculpture.

From 1979 to 1982, Julian Opie studied at Goldsmith’s School of Art in London. In 1995 he was resident at the Atelier Calder in Saché, where he prepared his ...

Article

John-Paul Stonard

(b London, Dec 12, 1958).

English sculptor, painter, printmaker and installation artist. He studied at Goldsmiths’ College (1979–82) under Michael Craig-Martin, for whom he briefly worked as an assistant, and emerged as an influential figure on the British art scene in the 1980s, with a highly inventive series of painted metal sculptures. These humorous and playful sculptures combined a loosely painted imagery with steel shapes, as in the case of This One Took Ages to Make (1983; New York, Mr and Mrs A. Safir priv. col., see 1994 exh. cat., p.15), representing a red typewriter supported by the loose pages that fall from it. Towards the end of the 1980s his sculptures became larger, more austere and minimal, and were often based on a relationship between art and architecture. As his work developed it dealt increasingly with the exploration of visual and spatial experience, often with reference to digital simulation. Imagine You are Walking (1–18)...

Article

Portuguese, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1954, in Lisbon.

Sculptor of assemblages, installation artist.

Rui Sanches was a pupil at Goldsmith's College of Art in London and at Yale University in the USA. He lives and works in Lisbon. His works gather together and juxtapose geometric elements attributed to the composition of classical paintings or to the exhibition site, and fragmentary, organic elements such as parts of the human body, heads, trunks and animal paws....

Article

Andrew Cross

Reviser Mary Chou

(b London Aug 9, 1962).

British sculptor, painter and installation artist. Born to Nigerian parents, he grew up in Nigeria before returning to England to study Fine Art in London at Byam Shaw School of Art and Goldsmiths’ College where he completed his MFA. Shonibare’s West African heritage has been at the heart of his work since he started exhibiting in 1988, when he began using ‘Dutch-wax’ dyed fabrics, commonly found in Western Africa, both for wall-mounted works (as pseudo paintings) and for sculpted figures. Generally perceived as ‘authentic’African cloth, the tradition of Batik originated in Indonesia, and was appropriated by the Dutch who colonized the country. Manufactured in Holland and Britain, the cloth was then shipped to West Africa where it became the dress of the working class in nations such as Nigeria. Shonibare used the material as a way of deconstructing the more complex histories that determine these and other images of ethnicity. As such, he has been described as a ‘post-cultural hybrid’ or the ‘quintessential postcolonial artist’ by critics as well as the artist himself....

Article

Catherine M. Grant

(b Castle Eden, nr Hartlepool).

English sculptor, installation artist, curator and writer. She studied at Sunderfield Polytechnic between 1980 and 1983 and Goldsmiths’ College, London, between 1984 and 1986. In the early 1990s she used furniture and domestic objects as sculptural materials, reworking them so that they became art objects, as with Shadow Box (1990; see 1997 exh. cat.). Here a padded leather seat, which seems to be a typical gallery bench, is echoed by an abstract wall relief, also in leather; closer inspection reveals that the latter is sewn into squares that could be the interior of the seat, inducing the sensation both of sitting on the installation and of looking at what is normally ignored or unseen in the gallery. For Gold Card (1992; see 1997 exh. cat.) Smith placed gold credit cards bearing the message ‘I wanna be your fantasy’ in various phone booths along Charing Cross Road in London, adjacent to cards advertising the services of prostitutes; the invitation to use the card to buy intimacy linked ‘acceptable’ consumer lust with the taboo sale of the fantasises on display next to them. Smith often created viewing situations that encourage a reassessment of the values represented by everyday objects and scenarios, transforming the ordinary into trophies or mementos that lay bare uncomfortable associations. In the sculpture ...

Article

Dutch, 20th century, female.

Active in Brussels.

Born 1945, in Amsterdam.

Sculptor of assemblages.

Edith de Vries studied art history in Amsterdam from 1963 to 1966, then trained as a sculptor and goldsmith in Florence. She took up residence in Belgium around 1975 and became a full-time artist. She creates sculptural objects from a variety of materials such as wood and glass. Her reliefs are almost Baroque, and are made from assembled boxes filled with all kinds of recycled objects, rubbish and scraps from carpenters' workshops or ironworks that are opposites in nature and effect, a process clearly reminiscent of the work of Joseph Cornell....