1-20 of 1,629 results  for:

  • American Art x
  • Sculpture and Carving x
Clear all

Article

American, 20th century, female.

Born 1894, in Mount Healthy (Ohio), according to some sources, in Widdern (Germany).

Sculptor.

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 24 January 1940, in New York.

Painter, sculptor, performance artist, video artist. Multimedia.

Body Art, Conceptual Art.

Vito Acconci was born in the Bronx, New York and lives and works in Brooklyn. He studied at Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts and at the University of Iowa. He has taught in various art schools and universities and in particular at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Yale University and the Parsons School of Design in New York....

Article

Frazer Ward

(Hannibal)

(b New York, Jan 24, 1940).

American poet, performance, video, and installation artist, and urban designer. Acconci worked for an MFA degree at the University of Iowa from 1962 to 1964. He initially devoted himself to poetry and writing that emphasized the physicality of the page and then began to produce visual work in real space in 1969. He worked as a performance artist from 1969 until 1974. His performance work addressed the social construction of subjectivity. A central work, Seedbed (1972; New York, Sonnabend Gal.), saw Acconci masturbate for six hours a day, hidden under a sloping gallery floor, involving visitors in the public expression of private fantasy. Between 1974 and 1979 he made a series of installations often using video and especially sound, mainly in gallery spaces, examining relations between subjectivity and public space. For Where We Are Now (Who Are We Anyway) (1976; New York, Sonnabend Gal.), a long table in the gallery and recorded voices suggested a realm of public or communal debate, but the table extended out of the window over the street like a diving board, countering idealism with the realities of city life. In the 1980s Acconci made sculptures and installations, many viewer-activated, invoking basic architectural units and domestic space. ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born c. 1835, near Hollis (Maine); died 1906, in New York.

Sculptor.

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 11 May 1933, in Knoxville (Iowa).

Sculptor.

Arlo Acton studied at the California Institute of Arts. He exhibited in San Francisco in 1962 and was selected for the 1963 Biennale des Jeunes in Paris. He also became a teacher at the University of California in Berkeley in ...

Article

Jennifer Wingate

[née Pond, Adeline Valentine]

(b Boston, MA, Oct 24, 1859; d Brooklyn, NY, July 1, 1948).

American critic and author. Adams was a vocal proponent of American sculpture during the last decades of civic sculpture’s golden age. She expressed her views on the state of the field in two significant publications, The Spirit of American Sculpture (1923; reissued in 1929) and a chapter in the 1930 edition of Lorado Taft’s History of American Sculpture, as well as in regular contributions to the American Magazine of Art.

Adams was an artist herself, though writing claimed her full attention. While she was in Paris in 1887, she posed for the sculptor Herbert Adams, whom she married two years later. The resulting marble bust (1889; New York, Hisp. Soc. America) was exhibited at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, an exposition that Adams hailed for fostering a new ideal of collaboration between architects and sculptors. Adams praised the role that sculpture played in public life and promoted figurative work modeled in the French academic tradition. She admired artists like Daniel Chester French (...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 28 January 1858, in West Concord; died 1945.

Sculptor.

Herbert Adams attended the Massachusetts Normal School of Art in Boston and completed his studies with Mercié in Paris. During his five years in Paris he sculpted his first marble bust, that of his fiancée, Miss Adeline V. Pond. This work earned him a reputation for elegant sculpture and was the start of his fame. He became a member of the Académie Nationale de Dessin. Adams exhibited in Paris, where in ...

Article

Janet A. Headley

(b West Concord, VT, Jan 28, 1858; d New York, NY, May 21, 1945).

American sculptor. Raised in Fitchburg, MA, he trained at the Institute of Technology in Worcester (subsequently Worcester Polytechnic Institute), the Massachusetts Normal Art School in Boston (now the Massachusetts College of Art and Design) and the Maryland Institute of Art in Baltimore, following an artistic path that mirrored that of many of his contemporaries. Arriving in Paris around 1885, he found a mentor in Antonin Mercié (1845–1916), whose accomplished bronzes evoke Italian Renaissance prototypes. He briefly established his own studio in Paris in 1888, and from 1890 to 1895 he taught at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn.

Adams won important commissions for public monuments in Boston (clergyman William Ellery Channing, 1904) and New York (William Cullen Bryant, 1911). The latter, located on the grounds of the New York Public Library, features a dignified seated portrait of the poet, editor and advocate of Central Park and the Metropolitan Museum; architect Thomas Hastings (...

Article

Canadian First Nations (Oji-Cree), 20th century, female.

Born 28 March 1971, in Yorkton (Saskatchewan).

Installation artist, ceramicist, photographer, sculptor, printmaker.

KC Adams studied at Concordia University, in Montreal, Quebec, where she received her BFA in Studio Arts in 1998. Her artistic practice was further developed through artists’ residencies in Canada, at institutions in Banff, Charlottetown and Winnipeg. During her ...

Article

American, 20th – 21st century, female.

Born 3 August 1955, in Bristol (Pennsylvania).

Painter, sculptor, video artist, installation artist.

Lisa Adams studied at the University of Heidelberg, Germany, in 1976; Scripps College, Claremont, California, obtaining a BA in 1977; and Claremont Graduate University, receiving an MFA in ...

Article

American, 20th century, female.

Active in Chicago 1909-1910.

Sculptor.

Article

Regenia Perry, Christina Knight, dele jegede, Bridget R. Cooks, Camara Dia Holloway and Jenifer P. Borum

[Afro-American; Black American]

Term used to describe art made by Americans of African descent. While the crafts of African Americans in the 18th and 19th centuries continued largely to reflect African artistic traditions (see Africa, §VIII), the earliest fine art made by professional African American artists was in an academic Western style (see fig.).

Regenia Perry, revised by Christina Knight

The first African American artist to be documented was Joshua Johnson, a portrait painter who practised in and around Baltimore, MD. Possibly a former slave in the West Indies, he executed plain, linear portraits for middle-class families (e.g. Sarah Ogden Gustin, c. 1798–1802; Washington, DC, N.G.A.). Only one of the approximately 83 portraits attributed to Johnson is signed, and none is dated. There are only two African American sitters among Johnson’s attributions. Among the second generation of prominent 19th-century African American artists were the portrait-painter ...

Article

Theresa Leininger-Miller

[Negro Colony]

Group of African American artists active in France in the 1920s and 1930s. Between the world wars Paris became a Mecca for a “lost generation” of Americans. Hundreds of artists, musicians, and writers from all over the world flocked to the French capital in search of a sense of community and freedom to be creative. For African Americans, the lure of Paris was enhanced by fear of and disgust with widespread racial discrimination experienced in the United States. They sought a more nurturing environment where their work would receive serious attention, as well as the chance to study many of the world’s greatest cultural achievements. France offered this along with an active black diasporal community with a growing sense of Pan-Africanism. Painters, sculptors, and printmakers thrived there, studying at the finest art academies, exhibiting at respected salons, winning awards, seeing choice art collections, mingling with people of diverse ethnic origins, dancing to jazz, and fervently discussing art, race, literature, philosophy, and politics. Although their individual experiences differed widely, they had much in common, including exposure to traditional European art, African art, modern art, and proto-Negritude ideas. As a result of their stay in Paris, all were affected artistically, socially, and politically in positive ways and most went on to have distinguished careers....

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 1913, in New York; died 1993.

Sculptor, assemblage artist.

Peter Agostini studied at the Leonardo da Vinci School in New York. He took part in international collective exhibitions such as the 1963 São Paulo Biennale. After 1960 he held numerous solo exhibitions in New York and a few in Chicago. He taught at Colombia University ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 8 May 1878, in San Francisco; died 1949, in New York.

Sculptor. Figures. Monuments, equestrian groups.

Robert Ingersolt Aitken studied at the Mark Hopkins Institute of Sculpture in San Francisco, where he later became a teacher, replacing the sculptor of sporting subjects, Douglas Tilden. He started exhibiting in ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1864, in Clarendon (New York); died 1926, in Mont Mikeno or Kabale, Belgian Congo (now Democratic Republic of Congo).

Sculptor, photographer. Animals.

Carl Ethan Akeley began working as a taxidermist at the age of 17 at Ward's Natural Science Establishment in Rochester, New York. He later became associate curator at the Roosevelt American Museum of Natural History in New York, where he laid out the African rooms and the Hall of African Mammals was named after him. On trips to Africa for the museum, Akeley observed animals closely. In ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 10 July 1825, in Sacoarapa (Maine); died 21 May 1861, in Philadelphia.

Sculptor.

Benjamin Akers' father, a wood turner, was his first teacher. He studied sculpture in Boston and in 1850 opened a studio in Portland in collaboration with the painter Tilton. He carved busts of ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 15 November 1836, near Hollis (Maine); died 16 September 1906, in New York.

Sculptor, draughtsman. Busts.

Charles Akers' brother, Benjamin Akers, was his teacher in Rome from 1857 to 1858. He sculpted a large number of busts and medallions of famous men, including ...

Article

American, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1966, in New York.

Sculptor, painter, installation artist. Murals.

Ricci Albenda studied at the Rhode Island School of Design, including courses in architecture, receiving a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1988. His interest in architecture (as well as in graphic design and physics) figures prominently in his installation art, in which he creates environments which challenge the viewer's spatial perceptions. He uses such materials as fibreglass, wallboard, aluminium and acrylic paint. In his exhibition ...

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 1891, in Waverly (Iowa).

Sculptor.