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Article

Abbon  

French, 7th century, male.

Active in Limoges from 600 to 630.

Sculptor.

This artist is thought to be the Master of St Eloysius.

Article

French, 9th century, male.

Active in Tours.

Monk, miniaturist.

Article

Adelr  

German, 6th – 7th century, male.

Active at the beginning of the Middle Ages.

Sculptor.

On the wall of the chapel of St Anne, in Worms Cathedral, there is an old stone relief of Daniel in the LionsDen by this artist.

Article

T. I. Zeymal’

Buddhist monastery of the 7th century ad to first half of the 8th, in the valley of the Vakhsh River, 12 km east of Kurgan-Tyube, southern Tajikistan. During this early medieval period it belonged to Vakhsh (U-sha in Chinese sources), one of the 27 domains of Tokharistan. Excavations between 1960 and 1975 by the Academy of Sciences, Tajikistan, and the Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, exposed the entire site; most of the finds are on loan to the Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg. The buildings, which covered an area of 100×50 m, were constructed of mud-bricks (c. 490×250×110 mm) and rammed earth, with walls surviving to a height of 5.5 to 6.0 m. The site comprised two square complexes linked by an enfilade of three rooms (see fig. (a)). The south-eastern complex or monastery (b) had domed cells (c) for monks, a hall or refectory (d), service quarters, store-rooms and a small sanctuary (e). An open courtyard in the centre had a fired brick path across it, linking the enfilade to the sanctuary. A corridor around the perimeter of the courtyard was divided into four right-angled sections by a deep iwan, or vestibule, in the middle of each side. One of these vestibules led into the sanctuary, the second into the meeting-hall, the third into the enfilade and the fourth to the monastery exit (j) and also on to a vaulted ramp (k) that originally gave access to the roof and the now lost second storey....

Article

Aesopus  

6th century, male.

Active in Attica in the first quarter of the 6th century BC.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Aesopus' name, together with a reference to his brothers, was found in Attic characters on a base from Sigea in the Troad (the area around Troy).

Article

British, 8th century, male.

Active from 724 to 740.

Miniaturist.

Anglo-Irish School.

Aethelwold was Bishop of Lindisfarne and is thought to be the painter of the miniatures in the oldest British bible The Durham Book, preserved in the British Museum.

London (British Mus.): The Durham Book...

Article

Alano  

Italian, 8th century, male.

Miniaturist.

This monk worked in Italy.

Article

Italian, 9th century, male.

Miniaturist.

There is a richly decorated and illuminated Bible attributed to this artist in the archives of the cathedral in Monza.

Article

Amandus  

9th century, male.

Miniaturist.

Identified in the dedication to the Vivian Bible (now preserved in Paris) as a co-illustrator along with Sigvaldus and Aregarius.

Article

Amasis  

6th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Ionia.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek, Archaic Period.

Attic School.

The signature Amasis made this ( Amasis epoiesen), may mean that Amasis was not the artist who painted these vases, but the potter. Three amphorae, four oenochoes (wine jugs) and the remains of a kylix (drinking vessel) exist by this artist. The subjects are taken from Homer, the legend of Heracles, and the myth of Perseus and the Gorgon. The figures in his pottery are black-figure Attic in style, standing out clearly against a plain background. Their clothes are decorated with incised and often geometric detail. The artist has highlighted the clothes with a purplish red and the flesh of the women with white....

Article

6th century, male.

Active in Corinth, at the beginning of the 6th century BC.

Painter, potter.

Ancient Greek.

Article

6th century, male.

Active in Attica, at the end of the 6th century BC.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Mentioned in Pliny, Amphicrates may have made a bronze statue of a Lioness that stood at the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens. It was a symbolic reference to the lyre player Leaina, a friend of one of the Tyrannicides, who was said to have cut out her tongue rather than betray the conspirators under torture....

Article

Anacles  

6th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek.

Working in the Attic black-figure style, Anacles' signature appears coupled with that of Nicosthenes.

Article

6th century, male.

Active in the first half of the 6th century BC.

Born at Chios.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

He is known to have worked in Delos. A passage in The Birds by Aristophanes suggests that he was the first to have depicted the goddess Nike with wings....

Article

6th century, male.

Active at the end of the 6th century BC.

Potter, vase painter.

Ancient Greek, Archaic Period.

Credited with inventing red-figure ceramic painting, Andocides produced both red- and black-figure vases. The clothes of his figures are ornamented, while his naked figures are decorative, with the muscles indicated by geometric patterns....

Article

6th century, male.

Angelion is believed to have been a pupil of the Cretan masters Dipoinus and Scyllis. In collaboration with Tectaeus he carried out an enormous Apollo (still in existence in the 2nd century BC) for the Porinos Naos. According to Athenagoras he also made an ...

Article

Richard Gem, Carola Hicks, David Park, Janet Backhouse, Leslie Webster and Mildred Budny

Art of the period in England between the Germanic invasions of the later 5th century ad and the Norman Conquest of 1066.

Richard Gem

The invading Angles, Saxons, Jutes, and possibly Frisians settled all over lowland England, bringing their Germanic culture (see Migration period) and establishing kingdoms—the Jutes and Saxons in the south and the Anglians in the east, Mercia (the Midlands), and what became Northumbria, north of the River Humber. The native British were pushed into Wales and the far south-west, and paganism replaced the Christianity that had survived from late Roman times. Artefacts from this period consist largely of burial goods recovered from excavated cemeteries.

New Christian missions arrived in Kent from Italy and Frankish Gaul in the late 6th century (see Canterbury, §I) and in Northumbria from Ireland and Scotland in the 7th, resulting in the gradual conversion of all the kingdoms and the adoption of the Roman liturgy after 664. The conversion to Christianity encouraged not only the construction of stone buildings and crosses, but also the production of liturgical books, vessels, and vestments, many of which survive. Although a Mediterranean-based culture was transmitted via the Merovingians (...

Article

6th century, male.

Active probably in Athens.

Sculptor (stone/bronze).

Ancient Greek, Archaic Period.

The figure of Antenor dominates the history of the fine arts of the Attica of his time. Around 506 BC, he was commissioned by Cleisthenes to make a bronze group of the ...

Article

6th century, male.

Vase painter.

Ancient Greek.

The signature Archenides [made] me ( Archeneides me) appears on both sides of an Attic black-figure cup.

Article

6th century, male.

Active probably towards the end of the 1st half of the 6th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Chios.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Archermus was one of a family from Chios descended, according to Pliny, from a certain Melas (though this may be Melas the son of Poseidon and a nymph, the hero and mythical founder of the town). We do know that Archermus' father was Micciades, and that his sons were Boupalus and Athenis. According to Pliny, Archermus achieved fame in Lesbos and Delos. A base, apparently supporting a sphinx or griffin and signed by Micciades and Archermus, was found at Delos. Attempts to link this base with a winged goddess also found at Delos and known for a long time as the ...