1-20 of 775 results  for:

  • Sculpture and Carving x
  • Ancient Greece and Hellenistic States x
Clear all

Article

Acestor  

5th century, male.

Active at the beginning of the 5th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Cnossus.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Acestor is believed to be the father of Amphion, who was sometimes - though wrongly - credited with the Delphic Charioteer...

Article

3rd century, male.

Active in Argos.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Acestor worked in collaboration with Toron, son of Apellion, also from Argos, on a votive statue from Troezen.

Article

Gordon Campbell

[Gr.: ‘high stone’]

Ancient Greek statue with a wooden body and the head and limbs made of stone (usually marble, sometimes limestone). This technique seems to have come into use in Greece at the end of the 6th century bc or the beginning of the 5th, and was predominantly, but not exclusively, employed for cult statues. The wooden bodies of acrolithic statues were covered in sheets of precious metal or draped with textiles regularly renewed in cult ceremonies. In ancient Greece the term acrolith (usually agalma akrolithos or xoanon akrolithos) was used relatively rarely, and is first attested in temple inventories of the 2nd century bc; Vitruvius uses it in Latin as a synonym for colossal statues. It was then reintroduced as a technical term by 18th-century antiquarians.

While the wooden bodies of ancient acroliths are not preserved, their stone extremities have occasionally survived and can be identified through specific characteristics of their technical manufacture (acrolithic heads, for example, have flat undersides, whereas heads fashioned for insertion into stone bodies were made with convex tenons). In the Hellenistic and Roman periods, the extent of stone elements can increase, so that for example the head and naked parts of the chest are made of one marble segment. The appearance of acroliths could be similar to chryselephantine (gold-ivory) statues, to which they may have offered a more cost-effective alternative, although it seems that other considerations, such as their role within the cult ritual, may have been of greater significance. Examples of surviving stone fragments from acroliths are a colossal head in the Ludovisi collection in Rome and an ...

Article

5th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 5th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Selinus (Selinunte), Sicily.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Acron's name appears at Delphi on a base for two statues ( Asclepius and Hygieia?) offered by Philistion, a devotee of Asclepius. The inscription dates from before 400 BC....

Article

Thorsten Opper

Elaborate monument erected by Octavian (later Augustus) in 29–27 bc on the Preveza Peninsula in Western Greece, north of the present-day town of Preveza, overlooking Cape Actium, to commemorate his naval victory over Mark Antony at Actium in 31 bc. The nearby city of Nikopolis (Gr.: ‘city of victory’) was founded for the same purpose at about the same time.

According to the historian Dio Cassius (Roman History LI.i.3), after his victory Octavian laid a foundation of square stones on the spot where he had pitched his tent, which he then adorned with the captured ships’ rams. On this foundation, according to Dio, Octavian established an open-air shrine dedicated to Apollo. Suetonius (Augustus xviii.2) and Strabo (Geography VII.vii.6) corroborate this evidence, although the trophy itself (with the ships’ rams) was, according to Suetonius, dedicated to Poseidon and Mars, presumably for their help during the battle. The hill itself was, according to Strabo, sacred to Apollo, and therefore the shrine was dedicated to him....

Article

2nd century, male.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

According to an inscription from Delos, Adamas, an Athenian active at the end of the 2nd century BC, and his brothers Dionysodorus and Moschion made a statue ( Isis?) that was erected in Athens.

Article

male.

Born in Rhodes.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Aeschines is known only from a mention in Diogenes Laertius.

Article

Aesopus  

6th century, male.

Active in Attica in the first quarter of the 6th century BC.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Aesopus' name, together with a reference to his brothers, was found in Attic characters on a base from Sigea in the Troad (the area around Troy).

Article

1st century, male.

Born to a family originally from Ephesus.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Agasias was a sculptor active in the first half of the 1st century BC. According to inscriptions from Delos, he made a number of portrait sculptures for the agora of that city. Two bases signed by him were found in the sanctuary dedicated to Poseidon on the island of Tenos. The inscriptions indicate that they supported a bronze group representing the ...

Article

5th century, male.

Active in Athens in the second half of the 5th century BC.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek, Classical Period.

Living at Alopeke (near Athens), Agathanor was a foreigner recorded as having received payment for work on the friezes of the Erechtheum in 408-407 BC....

Article

4th century, male.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Agatharchus is known from a signature from Thasos (dedication to Pan and Aphrodite).

Article

2nd century, male.

Born to a family originally from Boeotia.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Agatharchus' name appears in an inscription from the mid-2nd century BC found in the sanctuary of Amphiaraus at Oropus.

Article

male.

Born in Samos.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Agatharchus is known from two signatures from Ephesus, not added until the statues were restored in the time of Tiberius.

Article

4th century, male.

Wrongly described as a sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Agathinus is known from a signature on the marble tree trunk supporting a now-lost statue from Privernum.

Article

2nd century, male.

Active in the first half of the second century BC.

Born to a family originally from Soloi.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

The signature of Agathocles was found at Rhodes.

Article

2nd – 1st century, male.

Active at the end of the 2nd and the beginning of the 1st century BC.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Agathocles is known from two inscriptions from the Acropolis at Lindos, one dated 104 BC, and the other (a statue of Timachidas son of Hagesitimus) from the time of the First Mithridatic War (88-84 BC)....

Article

3rd century, male.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

A scene bearing Agathon's signature and showing the priest Aristis worshipping Horus, dating from around 250 BC, was found between the temples of Apollo and Isis at Cyrene.

Article

Agathon  

3rd century, male.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Born in Ephesus in the first half of the 3rd century BC, Agathon collaborated with Ariston of Chios on a votive offering from Timotheus son of Euphanes. The sculptor's signature was found on the Acropolis at Lindos (datable to c. 270 BC)....

Article

6th – 5th century, male.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek, archaic and pre-classical period.

School of Argos..

Ageladas, founder of the Argos school, was thought in ancient times to have been the teacher of Polyclitus. Other pupils were thought to have been Phidias of Athens and Myron of Eleutheres....

Article

Charles M. Edwards

[Hageladas]

(fl c. 520–c. 450 bc).

Greek sculptor. Said to be the teacher of Polykleitos, Myron and Pheidias, he was a bronze sculptor from Argos, active in the Late Archaic and Early Classical periods. His early works were statues at Olympia for victors of 520 bc, 516 bc and 507 bc. His monument at Delphi depicting captive Massapian women and horses may belong to the second quarter of the 5th century bc. The Zeus Ithomatas for the Messenians at Naupaktos was probably made in the 450s bc. A problem is posed by the date of his Herakles Alexikakos in Athens, said to be a dedication after the plague in the 420s bc. That has led to speculation on the existence of a second Ageladas. The dates of his Zeus Pais and Youthful Herakles at Aigion are unknown. The statues for the Messenians and at Aigion seem to have been under life-size since they were easily transportable. A sense of their appearance is given by coins that show statues with stances like that of the ...