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Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 1803, in New Germantown (New Jersey); died 1880, in Morristown (New Jersey).

Engraver (wood).

Joseph Alexander Adams worked for several years as a printer and then devoted himself to engraving on wood, which he initially studied alone. He later received advice from the engraver Alexander Anderson. He became a master and, with his pupils and collaborators, undertook the great work that made his reputation, ...

Article

Madeleine Fidell-Beaufort

(b New York, March 17, 1822; d New York, Aug 11, 1904)

American wood-engraver, art dealer, collector and philanthropist. Avery’s career as a wood-engraver and his involvement with the New York publishing trade began in the early 1840s. He worked for, among others, Appleton’s, the New York Herald and Harper’s and produced illustrations for trade cards, religious tracts, adventure stories and children’s books. By the early 1850s Avery had begun compiling humorous books and commissioning drawings from such artist-illustrators as Felix Octavius Carr Darley, John Whetten Ehninger, Augustus Hoppin (1827–96), Tompkins Harrison Matteson and John McLenan (1827–66). His business contacts led to close relationships with such artists as Frederick Church, John F. Kensett and William Trost Richards.

By the late 1850s Avery had begun to collect drawings and small cabinet pictures by local artists. Other art collectors, notably William T. Walters, asked Avery’s advice when commissioning works of art. In 1864 he turned his engraving practice over to ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 17 March 1822, in New York; died 11 August 1904, in New York.

Engraver.

When he became a publisher and art dealer in 1865, Samuel Putnam Avery completely gave up wood-engraving and confined himself to burin engraving.

Article

Born 27 March 1813 in Roxbury, Massachusetts; died 1888 in New York City.

Lithographer, printer, publisher.

Currier & Ives (firm).

At the age of 15 Currier was apprenticed to the Boston lithographic firm of William S. & John Pendleton. In 1833 he worked for the engraver and printer M.E.D. Brown in Philadelphia before going to New York and publishing his own lithographs in ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Engraver.

A. Halbert was probably a pupil of J.F.E. Prudhomme and engraved portraits and vignettes for the publishers Harpers Bros. and Rawdon, Wright and Hatch.

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born March 1797 or 1799, in Philadelphia; died 8 November 1865, in Dorchester (Massachusetts).

Engraver, draughtsman.

David Claypoole Johnston engraved some portraits and book illustrations for publishers. He became famous mainly for etchings of caricatures which he produced for the collection ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Engraver.

Fitzedward Jones produced dry-point and copper engravings of portraits and genre scenes. He was a printer and worked in Carlisle in Pennsylvania, and in Cincinnati in 1854.

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born in Great Britain; died c. 1862, in the USA.

Engraver.

John Kirk worked for various New York publishers.

Article

Charlotte Streifer Rubinstein

(Flora )

(b Leicester, England, June 26, 1812; d Brooklyn, NY, Aug 20, 1876).

American lithographer and draughtswoman of English birth. She was one of the principal artists working for the lithographic publishing firm Currier & Ives. She learnt to draw at a girls’ school in Leicester run by the artist Mary Linwood. With her husband, Edmund S. Palmer, she started a lithography business in 1841 (she was the artist and he the printer). They published a series of picturesque views, Sketches in Leicestershire (1842–3).

By 1844 the Palmers had immigrated to New York City and opened the printing firm of F. & S. Palmer. Fanny Palmer created prints of newsworthy subjects such as the Battle of Palo Alto (1846), sheet-music covers, flower albums and copies of architectural drawings for her company and other publishers. Nathaniel Currier soon recognized her talent and in 1849 published her two panoramic views of New York, seen from Brooklyn Heights and Weehawken. When the Palmers’ business failed (...

Article

Cheryl Leibold

American family of Philadelphia printmakers, printers, painters, and educators. John Sartain and his children, Emily and William, played an important role in the art world of Philadelphia for over a century. Their influence on American art lies primarily in the impact of their work example and leadership on others, and somewhat less from the value placed on their own artistic output. The patriarch, John Sartain (b London, 24 Oct 1808; d Philadelphia, PA, 25 Oct 1897), arrived in Philadelphia at the age of 22. By 1850 he was the city’s premier engraver of illustrations for a wide range of publications. His brilliant mezzotint engravings, often reproducing the work of others, brought graphic art into the homes of all classes. Reproductive engravings, either framed or in books, were widely popular before the advent of photography. Many writers promulgated the display of such prints as a means to refine and enlighten society. Sartain’s most successful endeavours in this field were his large and elaborate framing prints, commissioned by painters, collectors, and publishers to disseminate important works. The finest of these is ...

Article

American, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1749, in Boston; died 1831, in Worcester.

Engraver (burin), printer, print publisher.

Isaiah Thomas was a pupil of Zachariah Fowle. His works include an engraving of the Life of Jesus.