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Article

5th century, male.

Active in Argos at the beginning of the 5th century BC.

Worker in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Aristomedon was commissioned by the Phocians to make a work portraying the heroes and leaders of the country grouped around the soothsayer Tellias, to commemorate a victory over the Thessalians....

Article

3rd century, male.

Active at the end of the 3rd century BC.

Worker in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Ariston's name appears on a base from Corinth that once supported a statue of Cephisoteles, son of Timosthenes.

Article

6th century, male.

Active in the Archaic period.

Born on Aegina.

Worker in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Aristonous made a Zeus crowned with lilies, with an eagle and a thunderbolt, which was offered to Olympia by the people of Metapontum.

Article

Ascarus  

6th – 5th century, male.

Active Theban, active at the turn of the 6th and 5th centuries BC.

Worker in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Acarus was the pupil of a Sicyonian master (Canachus?), according to Pausanias. Before the Persian wars he was commissioned by the Thessalians to make a ...

Article

6th – 5th century, male.

Active in Argos.

Worker in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

A member of the school of Ageladas, Asopodorus worked with his compatriots Atotus and Argeiadas and the Achaean Athanodorus on the large ex-voto dedicated by Praxiteles of Camarina to Olympia between 484 and 480(?) BC....

Article

4th century, male.

Active at the end of the 4th century BC (?).

Worker in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Asterion made a statue dedicated at Olympia by the Sicyonian Chaereas, victor in the children's boxing competition. Since Canachus the Younger made the votive effigy of Bycelus, the first Sicyonian to win this competition, it would seem that Asterion worked at a later date than Canachus, probably at the beginning of the 4th century BC....

Article

6th – 5th century, male.

Worker in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Athanodorus, from Achaea, worked at Olympia with Argeiadas, Asopodorus I and Atotus, all of Argos, on the great ex-voto dedicated by Praxiteles of Camarina between 484 and 480 (?) BC.

Article

5th century, male.

Active at the end of the 5th century BC.

Born in Cleitor (Arcadia).

Worker in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

According to Pliny, Athanodorus was the pupil of Polyclitus. He worked with others on the great ex-voto at Delphi offered by Sparta on the first section of the Sacred Way in memory of the victory at Aegospotami (405 BC). He made the ...

Article

Atotus  

6th – 5th century, male.

Active in Argos.

Worker in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

The name of this artist appears with those of Argeiadas, Asopodorus and Athanodorus on the base of an ex-voto at Olympia dedicated by Praxiteles of Camarina between 484 and 480 (?) BC.

Article

4th – 3rd century, male.

Active at the turn of the 4th and 3rd centuries BC.

Worker in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Boedas was the pupil as well as the son of Lysippus, though, according to Vitruvius, nothing like as famous. Pliny mentions only one work by him, a ...

Article

Calamis  

5th century, male.

Active in Athensc.460 BC.

Sculptor, goldsmith.

Ancient Greek, Pre-Classical period.

Calamis, an Athenian by adoption, is noted in the ancient sources as a sculptor of divinities. Given the lack of agreement amongst these sources, however, it would be unwise to attribute many works to him. Two pieces, very similar in style, have been traditionally attributed to him: ...

Article

5th century, male.

Active in Athens, active at the end of the 5th century BC.

Sculptor, metal worker.

Ancient Greek.

Callimachus, whose origins are unknown, was active chiefly in Athens. The work most often attributed to him is a Venus Genetrix, a Roman copy of which is in the Louvre. This statue conforms to the ideal perfect rhythm described by Polyclitus, being constructed according to a geometry that is subtly emphasised by the drapery. The total height is equal to eight times that of the head, the mark of Ionian elegance, which can also be seen in the smile, the flowing hair and the grace of the general appearance. In this, Callimachus is clearly the follower of Phidias who had integrated borrowings from Ionian art....

Article

Thorsten Opper

Greek bronze statue of the early 5th century bc from the sanctuary of Apollo at Delphi (h. 1.8 m; Delphi, Archaeol. Mus.; see fig.). The Charioteer was discovered in 1896 together with bronze fragments of a horse team and chariot, the arm of a further, smaller figure (an outrider or groom) and an inscribed base block of Pentelic marble, all of which seem to have belonged to the same monument. A young man, the charioteer is clad in a xystis, the long, short-sleeved tunic typical of his profession, the long vertical folds of which highlight the statue's plain, column-like character. While the Charioteer stands erect, with his feet close together and his weight evenly distributed, his entire body turns to the right in an unusual, gradual spiral movement, perhaps an indication that the figure was meant to be seen in a three-quarter profile from the right. The statue was cast in seven main pieces, possibly in the direct lost-wax technique; only the left arm is now missing. Finer details were added in different materials (glass paste, black stone and brown onyx for the eyes, copper for eyelashes and lips, silver for the teeth, copper and silver for the inlaid meander pattern of the hair band). The remains of the dedicatory inscription (‘Polyzalos erected me… Make him prosper, glorious Apollo’) are essential for narrowing down the date and historical context of the monument. It seems likely that the ...

Article

5th century, male.

Sculptor, goldsmith.

Ancient Greek.

Dionysodorus was, according to Pliny, the pupil of Critius.

Article

4th century, male.

Active in Thurium in the first third of the 4th century BC.

Medallist.

Ancient Greek.

Molossus' signature appears (as Molossus or Ms) on some drachma coins. The reverse shows a charging bull, while the obverse shows the head of Athena.

Article

Myr...  

5th century, male.

Active in Agrigentum.

Medallist.

Ancient Greek.

Only the first three letters of this sculptor's name are legible. The signature is on a tetradrachm (four-drachma coin) showing a quadriga and two eagles attacking a hare.

Article

4th century, male.

Active in Cydonia (Crete) in the middle of the 4th century BC.

Medallist.

Ancient Greek.

Neuantus is attributed with a didrachm (two-drachma coin) showing the head of a Maenad and a young man drawing a bow.

Article

4th century, male.

Active in Thurii during the first third of the 4th century BC.

Medallist.

Ancient Greek.

Nicandrus was the designer of a didrachm (silver two-drachma coin), showing Pallas Athene on one side and a Charging Bull on the other.

Article

Onatas  

5th century, male.

Active during the first half of the 5th century BC.

Sculptor, worker in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Onatas is mentioned by Pausanias; no works survive that can be attributed to him with certainty. Pausanias' descriptions give us an idea of his work, among which is said to have been a Demeter with a horse's head. Some scholars have suggested that he was responsible for the east pediment of the temple of Aphaea at Aegina that, compared with the west pediment, shows a development towards a less archaic, softer and more personal style that is closer to the Classical style....

Article

Poly...  

4th century, male.

Active in Metapontum in the middle of the 4th century BC.

Medallist.

Ancient Greek.

Only the first four letters of this artist's name have been deciphered. It appears on a silver didrachm (two-drachma coin) showing, on one side, an ivy-crowned head and, on the other, an ear of corn and an owl....