1-14 of 14 results  for:

  • 1000–300 BCE x
  • Early Medieval x
  • Ceramics and Pottery x
Clear all

Article

Amasis  

6th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Ionia.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek, Archaic Period.

Attic School.

The signature Amasis made this ( Amasis epoiesen), may mean that Amasis was not the artist who painted these vases, but the potter. Three amphorae, four oenochoes (wine jugs) and the remains of a kylix (drinking vessel) exist by this artist. The subjects are taken from Homer, the legend of Heracles, and the myth of Perseus and the Gorgon. The figures in his pottery are black-figure Attic in style, standing out clearly against a plain background. Their clothes are decorated with incised and often geometric detail. The artist has highlighted the clothes with a purplish red and the flesh of the women with white....

Article

6th century, male.

Active in Corinth, at the beginning of the 6th century BC.

Painter, potter.

Ancient Greek.

Article

Anacles  

6th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek.

Working in the Attic black-figure style, Anacles' signature appears coupled with that of Nicosthenes.

Article

6th century, male.

Active at the end of the 6th century BC.

Potter, vase painter.

Ancient Greek, Archaic Period.

Credited with inventing red-figure ceramic painting, Andocides produced both red- and black-figure vases. The clothes of his figures are ornamented, while his naked figures are decorative, with the muscles indicated by geometric patterns....

Article

6th century, male.

Active in Attica in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek.

The signature of Archicles sometimes appears alongside that of Glaucytes. Little of his own work remains.

Article

7th century, male.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek.

Aristonothus' signature appears on a krater from Caere.

Rome (Palazzo dei Conservatori): krater

Article

Chelis  

6th century, male.

Active in Atticac.500 BC.

Potter.

Ancient Greek.

Article

Clitias  

6th century, male.

Active in Athens.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Clitias, who worked with the potter Ergotimus, is known from his signature on five vases. The most famous of his works is the 'François Vase', named after Alexandre François who discovered it in Chiusi. This vase, a krater, is exceptional first of all for its size, with a maximum circumference of 1.81 metres (nearly 6 feet). A black-figure vase using a new technique for the time (beginning of the 6th century BC), its stylistic innovations do not exclude a number of archaic characteristics. The composition, which includes superimposed friezes of decorative motifs and processions of animals, is a survival from earlier, orientalising styles. The same is true of the shape of the eyes which, significantly, are shown frontally on faces presented in profile. While the limbs are shown in profile, the trunks of the figures are shown frontally. Despite this, Clitias has produced a composition of remarkable breadth, though with a tendency to a certain miniaturism - a tendency that was not to be taken up as Athenian vase painting evolved further....

Article

6th century BC, male.

Vase painter.

Ancient Greek.

Epictetus' signature is found both as a painter and as a potter. In the period around 525-520 BC, vase painters moved from painting black figures on a red background to red figures on a black background. Naturally, this change did not take place overnight and some artists continued to paint in the older style while other, more innovative, artists developed a new style. Epictetus sometimes used the two techniques on the same vase, one on the interior and one on the exterior. Unlike his contemporary Cleophrades (also known as Epictetus II), however, he was not able to take advantage of all the implications of the new red-figure style. He produced little more than a negative version of black-figure painting: the white incisions indicating detail within the black figures are replaced by black lines that retain the stiffness of the incisions....

Article

6th century BC, male.

Active during the first half of the 6th century BC.

Potter.

Ancient Greek.

Ergotimus is known principally for having made, with the painter Clitias, the famous François Vase (Archaeological Museum, Florence).

Article

7th century BC, male.

Born c. 7th century BC, in Corinth.

Sculptor, painter.

Ancient Greek.

Eucheir, according to Pliny the Elder, travelled with Damaratus and Eugrammus to Etruria. He was a potter, and can probably be identified with the artist who, according to Aristotle, invented painting in Greece....

Article

Exekias  

6th century BC, male.

Active 550 to 520 BC.

Potter, vase painter.

Ancient Greek.

Execias may have worked with the potter Amasis, giving a very individual breadth to the amphorae painted by him. He was one of the masters of the black-figure style, most skilled in endowing even the most ordinary scenes of everyday life with a feeling of gravity. More often he depicted divinities and heroes, choosing his subjects from mythology, with a particular predilection for the story of Dionysus and his followers....

Article

6th century, male.

Potter, vase painter.

Ancient Greek.

Glaucytes' signature appears on a number of vases, sometimes alone, sometimes with that of Archicles.

Article

Psoieas  

6th century, male.

Painter, potter.

Ancient Greek.

Psoieas is believed to have been a vase painter.

London (British Mus.): vase, signed