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Article

British, 19th century, male.

Print publisher, engraver.

Robert Ashby was cited by Charles Le Blanc as active in London in 1803. A single engraving is known: H. Ashby, Writing Engraver.

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Active in London.

Engraver (burin), print publisher.

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Engraver, print publisher.

Basset the Elder lived in Paris, on the Rue St-Jacques, and was associated with Françoise Basset. He published a large number of anonymous plates, and also plates by engravers such as Alexis, Blanchard, Fortier, Gabriel, Gatine, Jubin, Rubières and Thiebault. Basset the Elder could be the same as the engraver André Basset mentioned by Heinecken....

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Active in the middle of the 19th century.

Draughtsman, designer of ornamental architectural features, engraver (etching), print publisher.

Article

German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 15 April 1748, in Nuremberg; died 26 February 1812, in Frankfurt am Main.

Engraver, print publisher.

Johann Christian Berndt settled in Frankfurt am Main in 1775, and was granted citizenship there in 1780. He was a pupil of his father and of Preissler, and completed his studies in Leipzig with Oeser and Stock. He then worked in Vienna and Würzburg with his brother Johann Oswald (born around ...

Article

Caldera  

French, 19th century, male.

Active in Lyons in 1825.

Engraver, print publisher.

Article

Italian, 19th century, male.

Active in Rome at the beginning of the 19th century.

Engraver, print publisher.

Le Blanc cites a portrait by Caranzano of Pope Paul V.

Article

David Alexander

[Antoine]

(b Brussels, May 15, 1772; d London, April 16, 1813).

Flemish engraver and print publisher, active in London. The son of Antoine Alexandre Joseph Cardon (1739–1822), a painter and engraver in Brussels, he was persuaded by the troubled times to go to London in 1792. He entered the Royal Academy Schools on 3 November 1792 and was engaged by Paul Colnaghi to engrave, under the direction of Luigi Schiavonetti, three of the Cries of London after Francis Wheatley in 1794–6. Cardon was an enterprising man, soon establishing himself as an independent publisher. He took advantage of the peace of 1801, in that year engraving and publishing in Paris and London Joseph Boze’s painting of The First Consul and General Berthier at the Battle of Marengo (untraced) jointly with the painter. He was known to Joseph Farington, who noted some of his activities, such as his purchase of two paintings by Philippe Jacques de Loutherbourg for engraving (4 March 1805...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 1806, in La Rochelle; died 1883, in Vertou (Loire-Atlantique).

Engraver, lithographer, printer, print publisher.

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1772, in Nantes; died 1817, in Paris.

Draughtsman, engraver (etching/burin), print publisher.

Alexis Chataigner, a pupil of François-Marie Queverdo, was one of the most prolific engravers of the Revolution and the Empire.

Paris, 14 Dec 1935: The Husband's Departure...

Article

David Alexander

(b Kingston upon Hull, 1770; d London, 12 or March 14, 1812).

English publisher and engraver. He studied in London under Francesco Bartolozzi and engraved a number of book illustrations but was best known as a publisher, issuing the designs by William Blake for Robert Blair’s poem The Grave (London, 1743). In 1805 Cromek commissioned Blake to draw and engrave the designs, but Blake felt betrayed when Cromek engaged Luigi Schiavonetti instead because he saw that Blake’s style of engraving would not please the public (for further discussion see Blake, William). Blake was further annoyed when Cromek commissioned Thomas Stothard to paint the Canterbury Pilgrims (1806; London, Tate; for illustration see Stothard family, §1), an idea that Blake thought had been stolen from him; in 1809 Blake published a very successful singly issued print of it. Bentley has shown that although Cromek had considerable understanding and sympathy for Blake his treatment of him helped to increase the artist’s isolation....

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Versailles.

Draughtsman, engraver (burin), print publisher.

Article

Born 27 March 1813 in Roxbury, Massachusetts; died 1888 in New York City.

Lithographer, printer, publisher.

Currier & Ives (firm).

At the age of 15 Currier was apprenticed to the Boston lithographic firm of William S. & John Pendleton. In 1833 he worked for the engraver and printer M.E.D. Brown in Philadelphia before going to New York and publishing his own lithographs in ...

Article

English music, book and fine art printers and publishers . In 1863 the Rev. John Curwen (1816–80), a congregational minister, established the Curwen Press in Plaistow, London with the aim of promulgating the Tonic Sol-fa method of teaching music. Under John Curwen, and after his death under his son John Spencer Curwen (1847–1916), the Curwen Press printed sheet music and texts on music education. By 1908 John Curwen’s grandson Harold Curwen (1885–?1965) had joined the firm and encouraged them to broaden their production to include high-quality limited edition books. Harold also created a lithography studio so that artists could produce book illustrations. In 1920 Oliver Simon (d 1956) joined the press as a typographer, later becoming a renowned book designer. His brother Herbert joined shortly after and together they held the posts of chairman and managing director respectively through the 1940s and 1950s. In ...

Article

Swiss, 19th century, male.

Born 1793, in Zurich; died 1884, in Zurich.

Draughtsman, engraver, print publisher.

Son of the editor Johann-Rudolf Dickenmann, this artist succeeded his father as studio director and supplied a number of aquatint plates for a series of views and panoramas of Switzerland. Several plates were painted in watercolours by his sister, Anna Dickenmann....

Article

David Alexander

(b London, 1747; d Paris, 1823).

English engraver and print publisher. He worked first for the painter Robert Edge Pine, exhibiting mezzotints of Pine’s pictures at the Society of Artists between 1769 and 1773. He then began publishing some of his own mezzotints independently: his portrait of Joseph Banks (Chaloner Smith, no. 4), made in 1774, was the first of 22 excellent mezzotints made after Sir Joshua Reynolds, 12 of which appeared during the 1770s. His 100 or so portrait mezzotints were well drawn and finely scraped; their brilliance was often enhanced by the use of warm brown inks. From 1776 to 1781 Dickinson published prints with Thomas Watson from New Bond Street, London; they engraved and published stipples as well as mezzotints and became the principal publishers of humorous stipples after the amateur artist Henry William Bunbury. In the decade after 1783 Dickinson engraved only two mezzotint portraits, while publishing plates by other engravers, such as his pupil ...

Article

Júlia Papp

[Antal]

(b Pozsony [now Bratislava, Slovak Republic], 1784; d Vienna, July 13, 1852)

Hungarian engraver, publisher and dealer. He studied under his father József Ehrenreich (1765–1842), a seal engraver, and in 1800 went to the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna, where in 1806 he won a prize. In the same year he made a portrait of Imre Marczibányi. When he had completed his studies he moved to Buda and worked in the Trattner Press. In 1807 he advertised himself as an engraver, letter engraver and seal engraver, and in 1809 he started dealing. In 1814 he engraved a picture of King David, after a drawing by Johann Nepomuk Hoefel (1788–1864). He did portraits of a number of important people in national political and cultural life, including Johan Spissich, József Ürményi, Miklós Wesselényi, László Kollonits, Archduchess Henrietta, István Ferenczy, Ferdinánd Jakab Miller and Benedek Virág. He also engraved several illustrations for the first Hungarian scientific periodical, the Tudományos Gyüjtemény...

Article

Arsène Bonafous-Murat

(b Mulhouse, Aug 17, 1788; d Mulhouse, April 25, 1839).

French lithographer and publisher of German birth. After commercial training in Switzerland and in France at La Rochelle and Bordeaux, he studied painting and drawing in Jean-Baptiste Regnault’s atelier in Paris. In July and August 1814 he visited Munich to study the new art of lithography. In March 1815 he founded La Société Lithotypique de Mulhouse, and in June 1816 he opened a workshop in Paris. Engelmann was instrumental in introducing lithography to France. He developed numerous improvements (see Lithography, §I), including lithographic wash in 1819 and a frame for registration (patented in 1837), which gave chromolithography the technical means needed for its commercial and artistic development. His presses produced large numbers of prints; particularly noteworthy are numerous plates for Baron Taylor’s monumental work Voyages pittoresques et romantiques dans l’ancienne France (1820–63).

Manuel du dessinateur lithographe (Paris, 1823) Traité théorique et pratique de la lithographie...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1759, in Paris; died 5 May 1812, in Paris.

Engraver, print publisher.

Antoine Filhol was the pupil of F.-D. Née. Although he engraved landscapes, he is especially remembered as a publisher, and in particular for his publication of the ...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Active in Paris at the beginning of the 19th century.

Engraver, print publisher.