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Italian, 17th – 18th century, male.

Active in Florence.

Sculptor, medallist.

Cited by Zani. Alberghetti would appear to come from a well-known family of artists of the same name who worked from the Renaissance to the end of the 18th century as both casters and sculptors in Ferrara, Florence and Venice (where several were in charge of casting operations at the Artillery)....

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Dorothy Limouze

Dutch family of artists. Zacharias Dolendo (b Leiden, between 1561 and 1573; d Leiden, before 1604) was an engraver. Only dated prints document the activity of this artist, whose early death was attributed by van Mander to drinking and wild behaviour. He was nevertheless a more accomplished engraver than his brother, Bartholomeus [Bartholomäus] (Willemsz.) Dolendo (...

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Antonio Manno

Italian sculptor, architect, draughtsman, antiquarian, engineer and decorator. He began his career as a goldsmith and engraver. He arrived in Rome in 1548 and the next year entered the workshop of the sculptor and architect Raffaele da Montelupo, where he worked mostly on wall decorations for mausoleums. Around this time he carved a statue of ...

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Geneviève Bresc-Bautier

French sculptor and medallist. He was trained in Paris by his co-religionist, the Protestant sculptor Barthélemy Prieur, whose daughter he married in 1600. In 1597 he executed a portrait medal of Henri IV with a profile portrait of the royal mistress Gabrielle d’Estrée on the reverse (see Mazerolle, no. 623), and it was perhaps this work that launched his official career. In ...

Article

O. Lohr

Swiss pewterer, Formschneider and painter, active in Germany. He was probably apprenticed to the pewterer Hans Friderich in Basle in 1574. By 1583 Enderlein was registered as a journeyman in Nuremberg, which was an important centre for the production of pewter in the 16th century (...

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Maria Leonor d’Orey

Portuguese silver- and goldsmith. A carta de privilégio dated 21 March 1588 and signed by the rector of Coimbra University granted him the privileges enjoyed by professors and students of the university. Another document (Coimbra, Registo Câmara Mun.) of the Municipality of Coimbra appointed ‘Simão Ferreira, silversmith and resident in the city of Coimbra’ to make ‘all things necessary’ for its chapel and for the churches in that diocese and in those of Oporto and Lamego. Two magnificent pieces by him survive in the ...

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Jeffrey Chipps Smith

German sculptor and medallist. He was the most important German sculptor working west of the Rhine during the late 16th century and early 17th. He was apprenticed to Dietrich Schro (c. 1515–94) in Mainz from 1554 and may have worked for Johann von Trarbach(...

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Fabian Stein

German families of goldsmiths. Christoph Lencker (b Ludwigsorget, c. 1556; d Augsburg, 1613) was the most outstanding goldsmith in Augsburg of the late 16th century. In 1583 he was licensed to practise as a master goldsmith in Augsburg, an increasingly important centre of goldsmithing (...

Article

Italian sculptor and bronze-founder. He was the outstanding member of a dynasty of bronze-foundrymen specializing in ornamental artefacts such as church- and table-bells, mortars, inkstands, door-knockers, firedogs etc. His works have been identified from the signature that he customarily cast on to his products: ioseph de levis in verona mi fece...

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Mark Jones

French medallist. He was the eldest son of Aubin Olivier (d 1581), first Conductor of the Monnaie du Moulin (the mechanized mint in Paris), and was appointed engraver to the mint following Antoine Brucher’s death in 1568. He learnt die engraving from Claude de Hery (...

Article

German gold- and silversmith. As a journeyman he worked for three master goldsmiths, one of whom may have been Wenzel Jamnitzer. In 1578 Petzolt became a master goldsmith in Nuremberg, where he remained except when summoned for three short visits to Prague by Emperor Rudolf II in ...

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Gordon Campbell

German family of goldsmiths , based in Nuremberg. The founder of the family was Christoph Ritter the elder (d 1572), whose best-known surviving work is a salt-cellar topped with an enamelled Crucifixion group (London, priv. col.), which he made in 1551 for the Nuremberg City Treasury. His son Christoph Ritter the younger (...

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Stephen K. Scher

Italian medallist and goldsmith. He was the son of the goldsmith Bartolomeo Romanelli (fl c. 1550) and the brother of Raffaele Romanelli, who was also a goldsmith. The Florentine writer Antonio Francesco Doni wrote a letter to Romanelli (see Armand and Pollard), included in an edition of the sonnets of Burchiello, in which he thanked him for a medal, which is recorded by Armand as being in the ...

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Gordon Campbell

German armour-etcher. Sorg was the son and grandson of Augsburg armourers; his maternal grandfather was Koloman Helmschmied (1471–1532) and his father was Jörg Sorg the elder. Sorg the younger also worked with his uncle, the armourer Desiderius Helmschmied. Examples of armour etched to Sorg’s designs are preserved in the Royal Armouries Museum in Leeds, the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna and the Metropolitan Museum in New York. These armours are not signed, but can be identified from an album of pen and wash drawings (now in the Staatsbibliothek in Stuttgart) that depict 45 armours decorated by Sorg between ...

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Marion Hagenmann-Bischoff

German goldsmith. With his extensive surviving oeuvre of around 80 authenticated works, he is one of the most renowned goldsmiths of Augsburg. Embossed and cast-silver and silver-gilt reliefs, plaquettes and ornamental mountings, applied to small pieces of ebony furniture, were a speciality of his workshop (...

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Jeffrey Chipps Smith

German metal-founder . He was among the last of Nuremberg’s famous metal-founders, following the Vischer and the Labenwolf families. His mother Barbara was the daughter of Pankraz Labenwolf, and he trained with and later worked for his uncle Georg Labenwolf. Two misconceptions exist in most literature on Wurzelbauer and the Labenwolfs. Firstly, although numerous statuettes and reliefs have been attributed to them by Bange and other scholars, these artists were metal-founders not sculptors. In virtually every case, their role was to cast the image in metal; the design and the carving of the model were tasks executed by sculptors, such as Hans Peisser and Johann Gregor van der Schardt. As their portion of the project was the last and most expensive, Wurzelbauer and the Labenwolfs were frequently mentioned in the documents. Proud of their achievements, they occasionally signed the completed work. Secondly, Wurzelbauer and the other Nuremberg metal-casters used brass, rather than bronze as has been thought by previous scholars. Recent research has demonstrated that the Nuremberg artists included a much higher percentage of zinc in their copper alloy, thus making brass, than most other German founders who blended more tin with their copper to form bronze....