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Article

Italian, 17th – 18th century, male.

Active in Florence.

Sculptor, medallist.

Cited by Zani. Alberghetti would appear to come from a well-known family of artists of the same name who worked from the Renaissance to the end of the 18th century as both casters and sculptors in Ferrara, Florence and Venice (where several were in charge of casting operations at the Artillery)....

Article

Gordon Campbell

Italian family of gunsmiths, active in the village of Bargi (near Bologna) from the mid-17th century, when Sebastiano Aqua Fresca was making guns, until 1809, when Pietro Antonio Aqua Fresca died. The most prominent member of the family was Matteo Aqua Fresca (1651–1738), a superb steel-chiseller and engraver who specialized in gun locks but also made steel snuff-boxes....

Article

French family of goldsmiths and bronze-founders. Members of the Ballin family were active in Paris from the 16th century to the 18th. Claude Ballin (i) (b Paris, 3 May 1615; d Paris, 22 May 1678) became a master goldsmith in 1637. He was granted lodgings in the Louvre, Paris, before ...

Article

Bernt von Hagen

In 

See Kilian family

Article

French, 17th – 18th century, male.

Born c. 1645; died 11 January 1729, in Paris.

Engraver, designer of ornamental architectural features.

Brother of Bérain the Elder. He made a number of drawings for gold- and silversmiths, and for arms and monograms. He is listed as engraver to the King in ...

Article

Fabian Stein

German family of goldsmiths, furniture-makers and engravers. Lorenz Biller (i) (fl c. 1664–85) achieved prominence with works for Emperor Leopold I, for whom he made a centrepiece with a knight on a horse (1680–84; Moscow, Kremlin, Armoury) that was sent to Moscow as an ambassadorial gift. Lorenz Biller (i)’s sons, ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

American goldsmith and silversmith of Dutch origin, based in New York. His most characteristic products are spoons, teapots, beakers and tankards (with coins set in the lids); his pieces are marked with the letters IB in a shield. The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York has a fine silver teapot and a silver seal made for civic use in Marbletown (Ulster County, NY). Jacob’s son Henricus was also a silversmith....

Article

Graham Reynolds

Swedish miniature painter, active in England. He was first apprenticed to a goldsmith and jeweller in Stockholm. He became adept at miniature painting in enamel, a method that had been introduced into Sweden by Pierre Signac (d 1684), and he is said to have studied the enamels of Jean Petitot I and Jacques Bordier (...

Article

A. Kenneth Snowman

Box made to contain snuff, powder etc, to be displayed or carried on the person. A history of gold boxes should properly begin with a reference to pomanders, scentballs, muskballs or boîtes-de-senteurs, as they were variously described. By the 17th century these objects were extremely fashionable and were to be found on nearly every dressing-table and in every pocket. They took the form of globular receptacles used to contain perfume or aromatic disinfectants and were often divided into hinged cells or ...

Article

Elisabeth Gurock

German medallist and wax-modeller. She was the daughter of Georg Pfründt, wax-modeller, medallist and engraver. In 1659 she married the medallist Johann Bartholomäus Braun (fl 1636–74; d 1684); thus before 1659 her works are signed a.m.p., and after that year, a.m.b. Braun first worked in Nuremberg, and later in Frankfurt am Main, becoming particularly recognized as a portraitist. In the style of Alessandro Abondio she produced wax portrait reliefs of numerous members of the princely houses of the Netherlands, Germany and other countries; on two occasions she was summoned to the Viennese court. An example of her work is a portrait of Ludwig William, Margrave of Baden (Brunswick, Herzog Anton Ulrich-Mus.). Braun also modelled free-standing wax figures, such as the signed statuette of ...

Article

Françoise de la Moureyre

French sculptor and bronze-caster. He came from a family of goldsmiths of Flemish origin who settled in Paris in the early 17th century. Early biographers state that he trained with Michel or François Anguier and at the Académie Royale. He spent six years at the Académie de France in Rome, where he is said to have studied above all the sculpture of Bernini. This was followed by four years in Venice. He applied for admission to the Académie in ...

Article

Gerald W. R. Ward

American silversmith, goldsmith and engraver. The son of a cooper, Coney probably served his apprenticeship with Jeremiah Dummer (1645–1718) of Boston. Coney may have engraved the plates for the first banknotes printed in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1690 and certainly engraved the plates for those issued in ...

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Clare Le Corbeiller

French family of silversmiths. René Cousinet (c.1626–92) was made a master in 1652 or 1654. An Orfèvre du Roi, he received payment between 1666 and 1684 for silver furniture (destr. 1689) made for Louis XIV, including mirror-frames, large repoussé chargers, containers for orange trees and chandeliers....

Article

Philip Attwood

British medallist of German birth. Trained as a jeweller, he arrived in England in 1691 and learnt the art of die-engraving. He became assistant engraver at the Royal Mint, London, in 1697, the year in which he executed a silver and bronze medal for William III symbolizing the ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

German architect and designer. He published ornamental designs (including grotesques) for artists working in gold, silver, glass and lacquer.

Article

German, 17th – 18th century, male.

Born 17 May 1666, in Biberach; died 24 December 1720, in Dresden.

Miniaturist, enameller, goldsmith. Portraits.

This artist worked at the court in Dresden.

Berlin: Portrait of a Woman (miniature)

Article

Fabian Stein

German goldsmith and jeweller. He was one of the most famous goldsmiths of his time, and almost all his works are in the Grünes Gewölbe, Dresden. After his training in Ulm he travelled as a journeyman to Augsburg, Nuremberg and Vienna. He is first recorded in Dresden in ...

Article

Carola Wenzel

German family of artists. From the 16th century to the 18th the Drentwett family of Augsburg produced over 30 master gold- and silversmiths who received commissions from monarchs, nobility and the wealthy bourgeoisie of all parts of Europe. Members of the family were active in many fields, including cast and repoussé gold- and silverwork, engraving, enamelling and even wax modelling. The founder of the family’s reputation, ...

Article

German, 17th – 18th century, male.

Active in Augsburg.

Born c. 1647; died 1727.

Goldsmith, engraver, print publisher.

Abraham Drentwett's output included 8 plates for Various Silver Pieces and 28 plates for Augsburg Goldwork. He sometimes signed with just his initials.

Article

Gordon Campbell

American silversmith, apparently the first to be born in America. He was apprenticed in the Boston workshop of John Hull (see under Boston, §III, 2, (i)). Dummer's silverwork is severe, but includes stylish objects, such as cups with cast scroll and caryatid handles. His apprentices probably included ...