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Madeleine Barbin

(b Liège, Jan 19, 1722; d Paris, July 31, 1776).

French engraver and print publisher. He was descended from a family of gunsmiths. In 1739 he went to Paris to join a brother who had established himself there as a goldsmith. Beginning as an engraver and chaser, in 1746 he obtained the rank of master. As early as 1757 he began to specialize in crayon manner (see Crayon manner §2) using a roulette, a process that brought him success; Jean-Charles François contributed in developing this process, but Demarteau, because of his superior skill, outstripped his rival. At a time when drawing was greatly in vogue, he offered the public faithful reproductions, first of red chalk drawings and then of drawings intended for decoration or teaching, in two or three colours, by contemporary artists. His oeuvre comprises 560 numbered plates, half of them after specially provided drawings by François Boucher (for illustration see Crayon manner) or after drawings owned by collectors such as ...

Article

German, 17th – 18th century, male.

Active in Augsburg.

Born c. 1647; died 1727.

Goldsmith, engraver, print publisher.

Abraham Drentwett's output included 8 plates for Various Silver Pieces and 28 plates for Augsburg Goldwork. He sometimes signed with just his initials.

Article

Marianne Grivel

(b Paris, 1561; d Paris, c. 1635).

French engraver, draughtsman, print publisher and dealer. He was the son of the goldsmith Pierre Gaultier, but probably not, as has been stated, the son-in-law of Antoine Caron and brother-in-law of Thomas de Leu. His first dated engravings (1576; Linzeler, 13–120) form part of a suite of 108 plates illustrating the New Testament. He was a very prolific engraver—his output reached at least 985 prints—and treated various genres, producing religious engravings, allegories, coats of arms and above all portraits and book illustrations. Although he copied the suite of engravings by Agostino dei Musi and B. Daddi after Raphael’s fresco cycle the Loves of Cupid and Psyche in the Farnesina, Rome (l 163–95), most of his work was from his own drawings. His work was published by a number of print publishers: Pierre Gourdelle (fl 1555–88) and, in 1591, by his wife (e.g. the Salvator Mundi, l...

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Born 1632, in Antwerp; died before 20 March 1671, in Paris.

Draughtsman, engraver, print publisher.

The son and pupil of the goldsmith Jean Pitau, Nicolas Pitau the Elder also worked with Corneille Gale and Philippe de Champagne. He went with his father to Paris, where he produced a large number of portraits and subjects after Raphael, Guercino, Carracci, Lefebvre, Mignard and Philippe de Champagne. His best works are perhaps the ...

Article

Christiaan Schuckman

(b Amsterdam, 1651–2; d Amsterdam, Oct 21, 1726).

Dutch mezzotint engraver and publisher. He was the son of Leendert Gerritsz. Valck, a silversmith from Amsterdam, and the pupil, brother-in-law and business partner of Abraham Blooteling, with whom he went to London in 1672. Valck’s earliest dated mezzotint, Sleeping Cupid (1677; Hollstein, no. 40), is after a painting by Guido Reni. Valck’s 67 engravings and mezzotints were mostly based on designs by other artists, for example Peter Lely, Gérard de Lairesse (Hollstein, nos 1–2 and 22–3) and Philipp Tidemann (e.g. illustrations for an unpublished Danish translation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses; Hollstein, nos 32–8); they were often published by Valck himself. In Amsterdam he worked in partnership with his brother-in-law Pieter Schenck and later with his son Leonardus Valck. Gerard Valck’s publications include atlases, separate maps and printed globes, as well as series of prints with views of houses belonging to the Orange-Nassau family, trades and professions, fountains, chimneys and birds....