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Article

A. A.  

17th century, male.

Monogram of an engraver (etching).

Active towards the end of the 17th century; cited by Brulliot. Known as the engraver of a garland of flowers and fruit probably designed for use as a model by silversmiths and goldsmiths.

Article

German, 17th century, male.

Born in Dresden.

Painter, engraver.

Trained from 1611 to 1622 under a goldsmith, but then went over to painting. He did a portrait of Johann Zechendorf, rector and professor in Zwickau, which he engraved from the painting. This work shows him to have been uncommonly gifted....

Article

German, 16th – 17th century, male.

Active in Augsburg in 1570.

Born c. 1547, in Colmar; died 1617, in Augsburg.

Enameller, goldsmith.

Article

German, 17th century, male.

Born in Weilheim (Bavaria); died 1632, in Munich.

Sculptor (ivory).

The son of a goldsmith, Angermair went to Munich while still very young and became a turner at court from 1618 to 1631, doing works in ivory for Princess Elizabeth of Lorraine. Other works include a relief of ...

Article

(b Bolsward, Friesland, 1628; d Bolsward, 1691).

Dutch silversmith . He was the son of the silversmith Frans Rienckes, and he started his apprenticeship at the age of 11 or 12, becoming a master of the Bolsward guild in 1654. His use of embossed botanical decoration on silverware was part of the Dutch late 17th-century expression of floral naturalism in the decorative arts. He appears to have remained in Bolsward throughout his life, producing domestic and church silver. The small number of objects attributed to him includes presentation and alms dishes, salts and such smaller objects as hinges, plaquettes and brush backs. Three objects dating from 1680–81 (Leeuwarden, Fries Mus., 8023, 1949-260, 1955-521) demonstrate his different approaches to the floral theme: the rim of one large dish is divided into sections, each containing an individual embossed flower, whereas another has a swirling pattern of flowers tumbling out of cornucopias and fruits, vegetables and insects; a pair of hinges is decorated with a tight symmetrical design of flower heads and leaves. In other examples fish and crustacea are included in the decorative scheme, and putti playing musical instruments appear on dish rims and centres....

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Born 1640; died 1er December 1700, in Paris.

Goldsmith.

Bain lodged at the Galeries du Louvre in 1671 and was the son-in-law of Gilles Légaré, his associate. He appears only to have done raised translucent enamelling.

Article

French family of goldsmiths and bronze-founders. Members of the Ballin family were active in Paris from the 16th century to the 18th. Claude Ballin (i) (b Paris, 3 May 1615; d Paris, 22 May 1678) became a master goldsmith in 1637. He was granted lodgings in the Louvre, Paris, before 1671 and became Orfèvre Ordinaire du Roi. Nicknamed ‘the Great Ballin’, he was one of the most prominent French goldsmiths of the 17th century. He worked extensively for Louis XIV, providing an enormous quantity of silver and silver-gilt objects, including vases, bowls, display stands and incense-burners that formed part of the silver furnishings (destr. 1690) of the château of Versailles. Ballin’s work in the classical style also included ecclesiastical pieces (untraced) for the cathedrals of Paris and Reims that are known from numerous drawings (Berlin, Kstbib. & Mus.; Stockholm, N. Mus.; Beauvais, Archvs Dépt.), and which also feature in some wall-hangings, for example the ...

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Born 1615, in Paris; died 22 May 1678, in Paris.

Sculptor, goldsmith, medallist.

Claude Ballin made a series of articles in gold for Louis XIV, and was the maker of a number of bronze, silver and gold vases decorated with low reliefs (Parc de Versailles, Parterre du Midi and Parterre du Nord). He also worked for several churches in Paris and for the abbey of St-Denis. He became a master goldsmith in ...

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Goldsmith, painter (including enamel).

Barier worked in the second half of the 17th century in Laval and Paris. He is mentioned by Mariette in his Abecedario.

Article

Matilde Amaturo

(b Mantua, Sept 23, 1690; d Mantua, Aug 18, 1769).

Italian painter. He was the son of the goldsmith Giovanni Bazzani and trained in the studio of Giovanni Canti (1653–1715). Giuseppe was a refined and cultivated artist (Tellini Perina, 1988) and as a young man profited from the rich collections of art in Mantua, studying the works of Andrea Mantegna, Giulio Romano, 16th-century Venetian painters, especially Paolo Veronese, and Flemish artists, above all Rubens. His earliest works, for example the Assumption (Milan, priv. col., see Caroli, pl. 20), reveal an affinity with contemporary Venetian painters such as Giovanni Battista Piazzetta, Federico Bencovich and Andrea Celesti, but Bazzani rapidly absorbed the influence of Antonio Balestra, Domenico Fetti and most of all Rubens and Veronese. The inspiration of the last two artists is apparent in a number of works that may be dated in the 1720s and early 1730s. These include the Miracles of Pius V, the Conversion of a Heretic...

Article

German, 17th century, male.

Active in Germany from 1604 to 1615.

Engraver, goldsmith.

Mentioned in Le Blanc.

Article

Jérôme de la Gorce

(b Saint-Mihiel, Lorraine, bapt June 4, 1640; d Paris, Jan 24, 1711).

French designer, ornamentalist and engraver. The Berain family moved to Paris c. 1644. Berain’s father, also called Jean Berain, and his uncle Claude Berain were master gunsmiths. In 1659 Berain published a series of designs for the decoration of arms, Diverses pièces très utiles pour les arquebuzières, reissued in 1667. In 1662 he engraved for the guild of locksmiths a series of designs by Hugues Brisville (b 1633), Diverses inventions nouvelles pour des armoiries avec leurs ornements. It would seem that by this date Berain’s skill as an engraver was well known. Around 1667 he decorated and signed a hunting gun (Stockholm, Livrustkam.; see Arms and armour §II 2., (iii)) for Louis XIV, which probably served as his introduction to the court. Through the influence and support of Charles Le Brun, in 1670 Berain was employed by the crown as an engraver. In January 1671 he received 400 livres in payment for two engravings (Paris, Bib. N., Cab. Est.) recording the ceiling decoration by Le Brun of the Galerie d’Apollon in the Louvre, Paris, for which he also designed the painted stucco grotesques. In ...

Article

Philip Attwood

[Bertinet, François]

(b Ostia, nr Rome; d Rome, 1706).

Italian medallist, active in France. At the age of 22 he travelled from Ostia to Venice and from there, at the summons of the Finance Minister Nicolas Fouquet, to Paris, where he spent many years. In 1665 he executed a bronze medal of Fouquet. He spent eight years in prison as a result of his association with Fouquet, who had been arrested in 1661 after being denounced by Jean-Baptiste Colbert; between 1671 and 1687 Bertinetti made several bronze portrait medals of Louis XIV, one of them during his time in prison. He also made bronze medals of Maria-Theresa, Dr Jacques de Sainte-Beuve and one depicting an unknown priest. Most of his works are signed Bertinet, but one of his medals of Louis XIV is signed Bertinet et Auvy. His best medals are in a Baroque style reminiscent of Gianlorenzo Bernini.

DBI; Thieme–Becker L. Forrer: Biographical Dictionary of Medallists (London, 1902–30), vii, pp. 76–7...

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Died 20 October 1657, in Paris.

Engraver, metal worker.

Article

Geneviève Bresc-Bautier

(b ?Reims, 1622; d Lyon, Nov 17, 1692).

French medallist and sculptor. He was working in Lyon by 1657, when he produced a medallion of Archbishop Camille de Neuville de Villeroi. Further medallions worked in wax and cast in wax or lead, in the manner of Jean Warin, show members of the Consulat of Lyon and some members of their families and date from 1658–65 (e.g. Paris, Bib. N.; Lyon, Mus. B.-A.). Bidau also carved stone sculptures for buildings in Lyon, including a Virgin (before 1658), David and Goliath (1660), an Annunciation (1665) and St Catherine (1678). His relief for the Hôtel de Ville celebrating the Peace of the Pyrenees (1660–61; in situ) was made in collaboration with the local sculptor Jacques Mîmerel (fl 1649–70); in addition Bidau provided the model for a fountain (1661) in the Place des Terreaux.

In 1671 Bidau joined the team of sculptors working for ...

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Born 1622, probably in Rheims; died 17 November 1692, in Lyons.

Sculptor, medallist.

He worked in Lyons and was highly prolific. In 1680 he assumed the title of 'Sculptor to the King'. Clapasson cites the following works by this artist: Statue of the Virgin...

Article

Swiss, 17th century, male.

Active in Zurich at the end of the 17th century.

Engraver, draughtsman, goldsmith.

There is mention of four portraits by Johann Heinrich Bodmer.

Article

Swiss, 17th century, male.

Active in Zurich.

Died 1648.

Goldsmith, engraver.

Christoph Boller is best known for a portrait of him and his family. His son, Hans Conrad, died in 1695, his grandson, Hans Heinrich in 1725. His nephew, Hans Rudolf, was born in 1625...

Article

Swiss, 17th century, male.

Active in Montauban, Geneva and London.

Miniaturist.

Pierre Bordier was the son of the Geneva goldsmith, Augustin Bordier. His best-known work is a watchcase that has as its subject General Fairfax, The English Chamber of Parliament and Battle of Naseby (Lord Hastings Collection)....

Article

Italian, 17th century, male.

Born 1648, in Turin.

Sculptor, worker in bronze.

Son and pupil of the bronze founder, Andrea Boucheron.