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Article

C. Hobey-Hamsher

(fl late 5th century bc).

Greek painter. He was the son of Eudemos and came originally from Samos, but worked in Athens; none of his work survives. He was said to be self-taught. Vitruvius (On Architecture VII.praef.11) claimed that Agatharchos was the first artist to paint a stage set on wooden panels. This was for a tragedy by Aeschylus (525/4–456 bc), although it may have been a revival presented later in the 5th century bc. Vitruvius added that he wrote a commentary discussing the theoretical basis of his painted scenery and that the philosophers Demokritos (late 5th century bc) and Anaxagoras (c. 500–428 bc) followed him in exploring theories of perspective. It is unlikely that Agatharchos organized his compositions around a single vanishing point. More probably, individual objects and buildings or groups of buildings were depicted receding towards separate vanishing points. If Agatharchos’ experiments in perspective were confined to stage scenery, they would have been limited to architectural backgrounds, before which the actor moved. Aristotle (...

Article

Greek, 19th century, male.

Born 1852, in Athens; died 1878.

Painter. Waterscapes, seascapes.

A friend of the architect H.C. Hansen, Altamura visited Copenhagen where he attended the fine arts academy from 1873 to 1876. He was primarily a painter of seascapes.

Copenhagen, 3 June 1976...

Article

4th century, male.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Pliny Antenorides was, with Euphranor, a follower of Aristides - though not Aristides the famous painter of the time of Alexander but probably the grandfather of the latter and an architect, sculptor and painter. Nothing is known of the works of Antenorides....

Article

Sophie Page

Astrology is the art of predicting events on earth as well as human character and disposition from the movements of the planets and fixed stars. Medieval astrology encompassed both general concepts of celestial influence, and the technical art of making predictions with horoscopes, symbolic maps of the heavens at particular moments and places constructed from astronomical information. The scientific foundations of the art were developed in ancient Greece, largely lost in early medieval Europe and recovered by the Latin West from Arabic sources in the 12th and 13th centuries. Late medieval astrological images were successfully Christianized and were adapted to particular contexts, acquired local meanings and changed over time.

Astrology developed into a scientific branch of learning in ancient Greece, but because of the opposition of the Church Fathers it was transmitted to early medieval Europe in only fragmentary form in technically unsophisticated textbooks and popular divinatory genres. Literary and scientific texts provided more general ideas about the nature and attributes of the planets which were influential on later iconography. The first significant astrological images appear in 11th-century illustrated astronomical texts (e.g. London, BL, Cotton MS. Tiberius BV), which were acquired and produced by monasteries to aid with time-keeping and the construction of the Christian calendar....

Article

Greek, 20th century, male.

Active also active in France.

Born 1926, in Lesbos.

Painter. Landscapes.

Manolis Calliyannis began painting aged 15, and went on studying architecture until 1947. An pilot in the RAF during World War II, he then studied at the University of Johannesburg in South Africa and settled in Paris, where he exhibited for the first time in ...

Article

Greek, 20th century, male.

Active in England.

Born 1925.

Painter.

Michael Christos Caras studied architecture. He lived and worked in London from 1955. He created canvas reliefs by stretching canvases across different wooden frames.

He took part in collective exhibitions from 1960, including the European painting prize, Ostend (...

Article

Thomas J. McCormick

(b Paris, baptAug 28, 1721; d Auteuil, Jan 19, 1820).

French architect, archaeologist and painter. He was an important if controversial figure associated with the development of the Neo-classical style of architecture and interior design and its dissemination throughout Europe and the USA. He studied at the Académie Royale d’Architecture, Paris, under Germain Boffrand and won the Grand Prix in 1746. He spent the years 1749 to 1754 at the Académie Française in Rome but left after an argument with the director Charles-Joseph Natoire over his refusal to make his Easter Communion; this may have been due to his Jansenist sympathies. He nevertheless remained in Italy until 1767. During these years he became a close friend of Piranesi, Winckelmann, Cardinal Alessandro Albani and other members of the international circle interested in the Antique.

In his early student days in Rome, Clérisseau became acquainted in particular with English travellers and began to sell them his attractive topographical drawings of Roman architecture. Initially these were influenced by his studies with ...

Article

Greek, 20th century, male.

Active in France.

Born 18 December 1928, in Hanover, to Greek parents.

Painter, print artist.

The son of the famous architect Ioannis Despotopoulos, Rhigas Despotopoulos grew up on Chios, in the Ionian Islands, and was educated at the American College of Athens. In ...

Article

Dinas  

9th century, male.

Active in Greece 850 BC.

Painter, designer of ornamental architectural features.

Ancient Greek.

Article

Dimitris Plantzos

[Satra]

Greek city situated on the island of Crete, by the north-west foothills of mount Psiloritis (anc. Ida), 30 km south-east of the present-day city of Rethymnon. It was a centre for Aegean and Greek culture from the Prehistoric to the Byzantine periods (4th millennium bc–7th century bc).

Ancient Eleutherna is a typical example of a Cretan polis (city) inhabited continuously from at least from the 9th century bc (the so-called ‘Dark Age’ of Greek history) to the late Roman and Byzantine period (6th–7th century bc). Even before that, archaeological finds suggest the existence of a continuous presence on the site from the late Neolithic (4th millennium bc) through to a flourishing Minoan site of the 3rd to 2nd millennia bc. Although later construction all but eliminated traces of prehistoric architecture, there is still significant evidence to confirm unbroken habitation. In historical times (9th century...

Article

Greek, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1866, in Athens.

Painter, architect.

Adolphos Gelbert settled in Paris in 1900 and trained at the École des Beaux-Arts.

Article

Greek, 20th century, male.

Born 24 June 1878, in Alexandria, to Greek parents; died 1967.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman (including charcoal). Historical subjects, nudes, portraits, landscapes with figures, landscapes, architectural views, animals.

Constantin Parthenis studied in Vienna and then Paris. From 1930 to 1946, he taught at the fine arts school in Athens. He lived and worked in Corfu. An extremely discerning artist, Parthenis played an important role in the arts (particularly modern art) in Greece. Among other achievements, he fostered knowledge of Impressionism in Greece....

Article

5th century, male.

Born c. 490 BC, in Athens; died c. 432 BC.

Sculptor, painter, architect.

Ancient Greek.

Phidias is a particularly difficult sculptor to describe, especially since no works exist that can be attributed to him with absolute certainty. Some of his statues are known through copies or written descriptions. His main body of work, the Parthenon sculptures, has become badly deteriorated and in any case was executed for the most part by assistants, even if they were following his plans. Yet, although he is difficult to pin down in detail, his figure looms large through the example of his major works. There is something exceptional and larger than life about Phidias, both in his choice of statues and in the programmes of work he was to tackle, such as the Parthenon....

Article

Greek, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 16 February 1852, in Istanbul, Turkey; died 2 October 1909, in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman. Genre scenes, portraits, local figures, architectural subjects, interiors with figures, animals.

Theodoros Rallis (Théodore Jacques Ralli) studied in Paris under Gérôme and Lecomte du Nouy and at the École des Beaux-Arts. He travelled widely in the Middle East and North Africa, finding many sources of inspiration. He exhibited first in 1875 at the Paris Salon, and subsequently at the Salon des Artistes Français, of which he was a member. He received an honourable mention in 1885 and a silver medal in 1889 for the Exposition Universelle, and served as a member of the jury for the 1900 Exposition Universelle. He also exhibited at the Royal Academy in London from 1879. He was made a Chevalier of the Légion d'Honneur in 1901....

Article

1st century, male.

Of unknown origin.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Serapion is known to have worked in Rome, probably painting landscapes and architectural scenes.

Article

Greek, 20th century, male.

Active from 1948 to 1964 in France.

Born 6 August 1914, in Eleusis; died 26 January 1965, in Athens.

Painter. Stage costumes and sets.

An architecture graduate of the polytechnic school in Athens, Thanos Tsingos initially practised as an architect in Greece until the war, beginning to paint in 1932. He enlisted in the Greek army in 1939 and served until 1945. When the Germans reached Greece, he joined up with the allied forces in the Near East. After the war he spent time in Brazil where he worked with the architects who drew up the plans for Brasilia. He settled in Paris in 1948 and devoted himself to painting. He spent time regularly in Greece from 1958 and settled in Athens in 1964....