1-20 of 40 results  for:

  • Artist, Architect, or Designer x
  • Photography x
  • Oceanic/Australian Art x
  • Twentieth-Century Art x
Clear all

Article

Kyla Mackenzie

(b Nelson, 1949).

New Zealand photographer. Aberhart became a leading photographer in New Zealand from the 1970s with his distinctive 8×10 inch black-and-white photographs, taken with a 19th-century large format Field Camera. He is particularly well known for his images of disappearing cultural history, often melancholic in tone, in New Zealand.

Aberhart’s use of an ‘outmoded’ process for picturing subjects in apparent decay or decline paradoxically re-invigorated them. He was inspired by the documenting traditions of New Zealand’s itinerant 19th-century photographers. His generally provincial subjects included vacant architectural interiors and exteriors, such as domestic houses, Masonic lodges, churches, Maori meeting-houses, and cemeteries, war memorials, museum exhibits, landscapes, and horizons (see A Distant View of Taranaki, 14 February 2009, Auckland, A.G.). Aberhart also produced several compelling portraits, especially those from the late 1970s and early 1980s of his daughters (e.g. Kamala and Charlotte in the Grounds of the Lodge, Tawera, Oxford, 1981; Christchurch, NZ, A.G.)....

Article

Anne Kirker

(b Wyong, NSW, Dec 6, 1940).

Australian painter, photographer and teacher. Binns trained as a painter at the National Art School, Sydney (1958–62) and held her first solo exhibition at Watters Gallery, Sydney in 1967. It comprised vividly coloured and decorative paintings, with explicit representations of female genitalia. This symbolic imagery predated a collective push by Australian women artists to produce work that they believed was inherently female. She initiated many community arts projects from the beginning of the 1970s and was an influential force in re-positioning women’s work. This took into account collaborative projects and a respect for amateur techniques and traditions that thrive outside the art world of metropolitan centres. Her community projects included Mothers’ Memories, Others’ Memories for Blacktown Municipality (1979–81) and the art workshop program Full Flight, which Binns conducted for women throughout rural New South Wales (1981–3). Her Tower of Babel, an ongoing work open to contributors by invitation, was initiated in Sydney in ...

Article

William Main

(b Wellington, June 27, 1927; d 1988).

New Zealand photographer and film maker. He came to photography through membership of the Christchurch Camera Club. Moving to Wellington in 1945 he became an assistant to Spencer Digby, one of the country’s leading portrait photographers. After five years he moved as a cameraman and director to the government-sponsored National Film Unit, where one of his notable achievements was the Snows of Aorangi, on which he collaborated with John Drawbridge and the composer Douglas Lilburn. Although this film proved popular at the time, its worth was not properly recognized by the controllers of the Film Unit, and Brake therefore moved to London where he freelanced as a photojournalist. From 1955 to 1966 he worked for the international agency Magnum in Paris and New York. He also worked for the Rapho agency, undertaking assignments for Life Magazine, National Geographic, Horizon and Paris-Match. Independent of the agencies, he collaborated with the New Zealand author ...

Article

Constance W. Glenn

(b Hawker, Port Augusta, S. Australia, March 11, 1900; d San Francisco, CA, Aug 10, 1983).

American photographer of Australian birth. Bruehl trained as an electrical engineer in Melbourne, but in 1919 he emigrated to the USA. He developed his interest in photography while working for the Western Electric Company, New York. In 1923 he attended an exhibition by students of Clarence H(udson) White, who was then considered America’s most prominent Pictorialist photographer. White agreed to teach him privately, but by 1924 Bruehl had become both a regular student at White’s New York school and a member of his summer faculty in Canaan, CT. White encouraged the individualism shown by his students. Among them, Bruehl, Paul Outerbridge and Ralph Steiner became known for a crisp, graphic style that would distinguish the best commercial photography in the 1920s and 1930s.

In 1927 Bruehl opened his own studio, which prospered in New York until 1966. The photograph Untitled (Riverside, U. CA, Mus. Phot., see 1985 exh. cat., no. 20) of an apple, camera and lamp exemplifies his use of high contrast with black background and is an example of the table-top still-lifes that appeared in such magazines as ...

Article

Robert Smith

(John)

(b Guernsey, Channel Islands, Feb 28, 1837; d Melbourne, Feb 13, 1918).

Australian photographer of Guernsey birth. After his arrival in South Australia c. 1858, he pursued his interest in photography while working as a hairdresser, becoming a professional photographer in Adelaide in 1867. Economic recession led him to move in 1870 to the neighbouring colony of Victoria, where he worked as hairdresser and photographer in the goldfields settlement of Talbot. By 1871 he was able to open a studio in the larger town of Bendigo, achieving commercial success with carte-de-visite portraits and local views. He had an interest in art, having tried his hand at painting, and became a precursor of Pictorial photography, converting the formally posed group portrait into the conversation piece and producing landscape scenes with human interest genre subjects and picturesque effects to meet a growing nationalistic demand.

To take advantage of his increasing success Caire moved to Melbourne in 1876 to exploit its rapid urban growth as subject-matter, and to use it as a base for forays into the countryside, seeking novel or spectacular subjects. Expansion of the railway system and his adoption of the dry plate process gave him greater mobility, and he was able to photograph increasingly remote localities, culminating in an expedition to Mt Buffalo, in ...

Article

Robert Smith

(Pierce)

(b Wellington, New Zealand, March 30, 1878; d Sydney, June 19, 1953).

Australian photographer of New Zealand birth (see fig.). His father, Pierce Mott Cazneau (1849–1928), was an English-born New Zealand photographer, who became manager of a photographic portraiture studio in Adelaide c. 1889 and took his family to South Australia. While still at school Harold Cazneaux assisted his father and in 1897 joined the same studio as an artist-retoucher. He was mainly interested in becoming an artist and attended evening classes conducted by Harry P. Gill. Acquaintance with the influence of the English Pictorial photography movement in the 1890s made him aware of the medium’s artistic potential. Dissatisfied with his routine occupation in Adelaide, c. 1904 he joined a studio in Sydney where the work was similar, but a higher salary enabled him to buy his own camera and begin creative photography on his own account, including a lasting preoccupation with pictorial celebration of the diversity of everyday life in the city....

Article

Edward Hanfling

[William] (Franklin)

(b Port Chalmers, Jan 23, 1935).

New Zealand photographer, sculptor, installation artist, and painter, active also in France and Great Britain. Culbert consistently explored the workings of both natural and artificial light in his works, as well as the transformation of found objects and materials. A student at Hutt Valley High School, his artistic ability was fostered by the radical art educator James Coe. From 1953 to 1956, Culbert studied at the Canterbury University College School of Art in Christchurch. Moving to London in 1957 to attend the Royal College of Art, he became interested in the photographic works of László Moholy-Nagy and Man Ray, while his paintings were informed by Cubism. In 1961 Culbert moved to Croagnes in Provence, France; he remained in France and the UK for the rest of his career.

During 1967–8, Culbert shifted his focus from the analysis of form and light in painting to the analysis of actual light, often arranging light bulbs in grid formations. In ...

Article

Jeanette Hoorn

(b Perth, Jan 31, 1969).

Australian Aboriginal painter and photographer of Badimaya and Yamatji descent. Convent educated, she trained at Curtin University and at the Claremont School of Art, both in Perth, between 1992–5. Dowling gained broad recognition from the late 1990s with her confronting and haunting paintings that tell stories about her family and the history of British colonialism and race relations in Western Australia (see fig.). Rather than working in a traditional indigenous vocabulary, Dowling paints in a global style, incorporating a remarkable range of traditions. These include social realism, icon painting, Pop art and Surrealism, as well as Australian indigenous art. She combines these styles in a unique way in paintings that range from miniature icons to large studio portraits. Her style is ‘painterly’ and Post-modern, her imagery decidedly political.

Photographs from her childhood spent in suburban Perth are the basis for some of her group portraits. These family snaps act as an aide-mémoire in her paintings and her work is influenced by and contributes to the international debate that the French historian Pierre Nora’s work has engendered around history and memory. Her ...

Article

Patrick McCaughey

(b Bognor Regis, Feb 7, 1912; d Sydney, June 29, 1981).

Australian painter and photographer of English birth. His family settled in Melbourne in 1923, but Drysdale visited Europe twice in the early 1930s; on his second visit in 1932–3 he was particularly excited by the work of Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. The experience confirmed his desire to be an artist.

After returning to Melbourne, Drysdale studied for two years with George Bell, who ran the only school devoted to the teaching of modern art. In May 1938 Drysdale returned to Europe to continue his studies with Iain McNab (1890–1967) at the Grosvenor School of Art in London and then with Othon Friesz at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris. Such works as the Rabbiter and his Family (1938; R. G. Casey priv. col., see Dutton, p. 23) demonstrate his early interest in Australian rural life.

Drysdale returned to Australia in ...

Article

John R. Neeson

(b Ballarat, Victoria, 1946).

Australian photographer, film maker, painter, and installation artist. Dunkley-Smith studied at Ballarat Teacher’s College (1964–5), Melbourne Teacher’s College (1966), Ballarat School of Mines and Industries (1967–71), and at Hornsey College of Art, London (1974–6). Since the late 1970s, Dunkley-Smith has made an enduring foundational contribution to analogue and digital, time-based, and venue-specific installation practice in Australia. Initially trained as a painter, Dunkley-Smith’s work with film and multiple slide projection installations date from the mid-1970s when he was living in London. His installations are characterized by duplicate and triplicate screens and sequences of images of time-based works that utilize procedural methods addressing the relation of pattern to indeterminacy, aspects of representation, and audience desire.

In 1982 Dunkley-Smith was awarded an Overseas Fellowship at the Institute of Art and Urban Resources PS1, New York. From 1987 all his works were styled Perspectives for Conscious Alterations in Everyday Life...

Article

Robert Smith

(well Spencer)

(b Sydney, April 22, 1911; d July 27, 1992).

Australian photographer (see fig.). By 1929, when he joined the New South Wales Photographic Society, he had been an enthusiastic photographer for five years. In 1930 he began exhibiting and became assistant to Cecil Bostock (1884–1939), a leading commercial photographer and devotee of Pictorial photography. Dupain studied art at the East Sydney Technical College and at Julian Ashton’s Art School in Sydney. Within three years he had left Bostock and broken with the Impressionist effects of Pictorialism in favour of European-derived styles emphasizing form, dramatic contrasts and adventurous choice of subject. After a subsequent period of experiment with various modern artistic idioms, by the late 1930s he achieved a distinctive personal style based on perceptive and imaginative attitudes to subject-matter. His work had a growing documentary tendency possessing an affinity with developments in the USA.

During World War II Dupain worked first in a camouflage unit and then for the Department of Information (until ...

Article

Helen Ennis

(b Melbourne, March 19, 1943; d Melbourne, Nov 6, 2009).

Australian photographer, film maker, and video artist. Ford studied photography at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in 1961 and worked intermittently in the field of commercial photography in Melbourne until 1967. Her daughter Emma was born in 1967 and son Ben in 1968. Ford was a key figure in the development of the art photography movement in Australia and was one of the first women photographers to establish an independent art practice. Her earliest photographs, portraits of her female friends, were not exhibited at the time but were eventually shown at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, in 1982 and published in the book Sixtieth of a Second (1987). Ford’s first solo exhibition, Metamorphoses, was held in Melbourne in 1971 and her first Time series was exhibited at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, in 1974. She continued to exhibit regularly at public galleries and art museums in subsequent decades. ...

Article

Leonard Bell

(b London, Feb 24, 1928).

New Zealand photographer. Born and trained in London, she migrated to New Zealand in 1958. By 1964 she was working as a freelance professional photographer, and was soon prominent in several genres, notably portraiture, in particular of artists, potters, writers, and children, and ‘street’ photography, as well as photojournalism for periodicals and newspapers, such as the Wine Review and the New Zealand Herald. Several highly successful books followed from the 1970s. A major exhibition of her work, organized by the Auckland Art Gallery, toured the country from 2001 to 2004. Subsequently, there have been further acclaimed exhibitions of her work. She is regarded as one the key photographers in New Zealand since World War II.

Friedlander’s portraits reveal an extraordinary ability to bring into visibility qualities of personality and temperament, while her photographs overall can be seen as explorations of places and their inhabitants, in particular the complexities of people’s relationships with their fellows and the societies they live in. In these explorations Friedlander herself was a participant, that is, her photographs are also investigations into her own place in specific social and cultural situations, whether in New Zealand, Israel, England, or Tokelau in the Pacific. For Instance, her photographs of elderly Maori women with ...

Article

Anthony Gardner

(b Singapore, July 12, 1959).

Malaysian conceptual artist, active also in Australia. Gill studied at the University of Western Sydney, completing her MA in 2001. Despite working in a range of media, she is best understood as a process-based artist who has consistently explored notions of migration and transformation within material culture. These include the effects of international trade on such everyday activities as cooking and eating. The spiral form of Forking Tongues (1992; Brisbane, Queensland A.G.), for example, entwines Western cutlery and dried chillies from the Americas and Asia, highlighting how foods and utensils from across the globe have come together to transform local cuisines and inform culinary habits. Gill’s later photographic series refer to other understandings of migration, such as the spread of the English language or of capitalist desire throughout South-east Asia in recent decades. For Forest (1998; Sydney, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery; see Chua), Gill cut out words and sentences from books written in English, placed the texts within tropical landscapes and photographed the results before the books’ paper began rotting into the humid environment. For ...

Article

Charles Green

(b Sydney, Dec 13, 1972).

Australian photographer and video artist. Gladwell graduated in 1996 from the Sydney College of the Arts with a BFA and then from the College of Fine Arts, University of NSW, with an MFA in 2001. He then studied at Goldsmiths College, University of London, between 2001–2. Gladwell’s rise to acclaim was immediate, accelerated by the art market boom that lasted until the financial crash of 2008 and the proliferation of biennales around the globe, in many of which Gladwell participated (Venice Biennales, 2007 and 2009). With extraordinarily gorgeous, slow-motion cinematography but, importantly, a minimum of post-production digital manipulation, Gladwell’s early works consistently portrayed understated, seemingly casual feats of physical coordination, grace and physical endurance by young skateboarders, break-dancers (see fig.), capoeira practitioners or BMX cyclists. In his iconic early work, Storm Sequence (2000), the artist twisted and pirouetted in balletic slow motion on his skateboard in the face of an approaching storm as ocean waves crashed against the Bondi Beach foreshore upon which he was poised. In ...

Article

Anne Kirker

(b Grafton, NSW, Nov 14, 1953).

Australian photographer and installation artist. Hall began her career as a photographer in the mid-1970s, relinquishing a formal training in painting. She produced black-and-white modernist images of people embedded in their surroundings, favouring the incidental and over-looked. However by 1978, when she had lived for a time in London, Hall shifted away from the documentary tradition. Impressed by the Dada and Surrealism Reviewed exhibition at the Hayward Gallery that year, she started to create small yet dense tableaux from discarded objects. During 1978–82 she was a student at the Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, NY and, on returning to Australia, wholeheartedly adopted strategies of appropriation and intricate fabrication for her photographs. One of the first Australian artists qualified to teach photo-studies, Hall taught at the South Australian School of Art, Adelaide, from 1983.

Hall’s camera images became increasingly idiosyncratic, playful and interpretatively complex. Instead of seeing meaning in the world around her, she decisively devised projects that explored major philosophical themes. In ...

Article

David P. Millar

[Francis]

(b Sydney, Oct 15, 1885; d Sydney, Jan 16, 1962).

Australian photographer, film producer, film maker and writer. He was introduced to photography while working at a steel foundry in Lithgow, NSW, when his foreman would take him on photographic excursions into the nearby Blue Mountains. After an apprenticeship with a photographic postcard firm, where he gained a reputation for achieving spectacular effects with the camera, he was appointed official photographer to the Australian geologist and explorer Douglas Mawson’s Antarctic Expedition of 1911–13. The success of his prints and film footage led to his involvement with British explorer Ernest Shackleton’s Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914–16), where he produced another crop of dramatic images, which told the story of the ill-fated attempt to cross Antarctica. On a visit to England, Hurley was appointed Official War Photographer with the Australian troops, first in Flanders and later in Palestine.

In the early 1920s Hurley undertook two assignments in New Guinea, the resulting films leading to a tour of the USA and the publication in New York of his successful book ...

Article

Helen Ennis

(Joyce )

(b Melbourne, March 14, 1949; d Melbourne, Feb 21, 1980).

Australian photographer. She studied photography at Prahran College of Advanced Education in Melbourne from 1967 to 1970, graduating with a Diploma of Art and Design. She received a technical teacher’s certificate from Hawthorn Teachers College in 1971 and during the 1970s taught photography in Melbourne, Sydney, and Hobart. Her earliest photographs were in the photo-documentary style that was taken up by many young Australian photographers involved in the burgeoning art photography movement in the 1970s. She worked in black and white, generally taking photographs with the consent of her subjects. She did not use flash or distorting wide-angle lenses because she wanted her photographs to be ‘natural’ and ‘real’. Jerrems began to exhibit in Melbourne in 1973 and in 1974 her photographs of a broad spectrum of Australian women were published in A Book about Australian Women, which she worked on with writer Virginia Fraser. The book was an introduction to International Women’s Year and reflected Jerrems’s feminist politics and desire to effect social change....

Article

David P. Millar

(Henry)

(b Monaro Uplands, NSW, April 3, 1858; d Sydney, May 26, 1928).

Australian photographer. He worked as an operator in a carte-de-visite business in Sydney. When popularity for this photographic form of portraiture collapsed in the 1870s, he turned to a new and eventually lucrative business: scenic views of rural and urban Australia. Coinciding with the invention of the collodion dry plate process, which gave him more freedom of movement, he used the recently expanded railway system to reach places of photographic interest. By the 1890s his work dominated the photographic view business in Sydney; he had become more of a businessman than a photographer, employing several touring operators to meet his commitments.

The severe depression of the 1890s forced many photographers to close their businesses, and the demand for views dwindled alarmingly. Kerry, sensing that the growing postcard trade could become the basis for commercial advancement, began to produce photographic postcards. By 1910 Kerry & Co emerged as Australia’s largest publishers of postcards. Using presses in Germany to print his huge orders, and operating out of a large, four-storey building in Sydney, he had the income to indulge other interests such as horse racing, skiing and fishing. Kerry’s photographs, and those of his assistants, were avowedly commercial in subject-matter; they showed, through a misty-eyed nationalism, the heroic toil of settlers breaking in the land and the optimistic growth of Australia’s principal cities. Kerry and his company confirmed a young nation’s perception about itself, with images that have become visual icons of Victorian colonial Australia....

Article

Blair French

(b Brisbane, Aug 16, 1959).

Australian photographer. She is best known for her various large-scale colour photographic series produced from the mid-1990s onwards. Sometimes she depicted figures in the midst of carefully staged, physically expressive acts; on other occasions she has inserted forms and objects, for example carpets or furniture, into landscape settings. Her photographs merge approaches and visual structures drawn from painting, performance, cinema and the history of photography, resulting in images that dramatize the conditions and effects of human encounter with both natural and cultural environments.

Through the 1990s, Laing depicted this relationship in terms of encounters with technology, in particular technologies of flight and velocity. In her brownwork and airport (1996–7) series, Laing photographed the technological apparatus of air transport, in some instances posing figures in performative relationships to such machinery. She later photographed even more technologically sophisticated flight machinery in her NASA works (1998–9). In flight research...