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Dutch, 20th century, male.

Born 1921, in The Hague.

Painter.

Hermanus Berserik was part of the 'Nouveau Réalisme' movement that emerged in the 1960s which, contrary to a widespread tendency in recent forms of realism, rejected any form of political or social engagement. In his paintings Berserik aims to establish a report that is intended to be neutral, which he transgresses with irony, a detailed inventory of every item that constitutes his environment, which is everyone's environment. He thereby places a more or less subtle emphasis on the elements that indicate the so-called needs that are imposed by consumer society, fossilised into manias in individuals - the 'things' ('Les Choses') that are condemned by Georges Pérec in his first book of this title....

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 9 March 1938, in Chicago.

Painter.

Tom Blackwell's early work was abstract, but influenced by Pop Art, he moved towards photorealism and began to paint large-scale works, which often featured motorcycles, cars and planes.

1966, Psychedelic Art, Riverside Museum, New York...

Article

Danish, 20th century, male.

Born 1941, in Copenhagen.

Painter.

Brøgger combines many different techniques, and his paintings, which reveal a highly critical attitude towards society, include elements of American Pop Art, Art Nouveau and spontaneous painting. He first exhibited at the autumn salon in Copenhagen in ...

Article

German, 20th century, male.

Born 1940, in Hanau (Hesse).

Painter.

Nouvelle Figuration.

Hans Diehl studied in Munich, Paris and Berlin between 1959 and 1966. He was influenced by Pop Art and advertising art and his paintings tend to use Realism as an exploratory rather than a utilitarian technique. In ...

Article

Polish, 20th century, male.

Born 1942, in Lomza.

Painter. Figure compositions.

Pop Art.

After completing his studies at the academy of fine arts in Warsaw, Jan Dobkowski was able vigorously to challenge the Post-Impressionist trend, so-named officially in order to avoid the word 'academism', which still had some currency amongst many artists of his generation who were anxious to carve out a successful career for themselves. Dobkowski was the youngest of the artists to have featured in the ...

Article

Julia Robinson

(b Valrico, FL, 1930).

American performance artist and sculptor. Hay started out in the performance scene at Judson Memorial Church in downtown New York City in the early 1960s. He arrived in New York from Florida in 1959, after studying at the Florida State University (1953–8). His wife, the dancer Deborah Hay, was a key figure in the Judson Dance Theater, launched in the summer of 1962, and Alex Hay performed in many of its productions. In the early 1960s he assisted Robert Rauschenberg on set designs for Merce Cunningham, and danced with him with roller-skates and parachutes in Rauschenberg’s now famous performance piece Pelican (1963). After these collaborations, Hay was invited to participate in 9 Evenings: Theater & Engineering at New York’s 69th Regiment Armory (fall 1966). This initiative, conceived by Rauschenberg with critical contributions from the engineer Billy Klüver, was an idealistic effort to pair artists with engineers, to merge art and new technologies. That project evolved into ...

Article

Deborah A. Middleton

(Dickey)

(b Jackson, FL, 1925; d East Hampton, NY, March 4, 2015).

American sculptor. King’s figurative human representations are recognized for their often humorous character models, which blend smooth and rough surfaces to form a unique signature style. King’s sculptures are identified as Pop art and abstraction, and are represented by a diverse range of scales from the miniature to the monumental and executed with a versatile range of media, from clay to ceramics, wood, and welded or bent metals. His early influences were Isamu Noguchi and Elie Nadelman.

King attended the University of Florida between 1942–4, and moved to New York in 1945 to study at Cooper Union where he graduated in 1948 and continued studies in art at the Brooklyn Museum Art School in New York. King traveled to Europe on a Fulbright Grant to study in Rome Italy (1949–50) and in London at the Central School (1952). King’s first solo exhibition of sculpture was in ...

Article

Julia Robinson

Term used to describe a mid-20th century art movement in America. First used in May 1957, in Robert Rosenblum’s “Castellli Group” article for Arts Magazine, and then, more dramatically, in January 1958, in ARTnews with Jasper Johns’s Target with Four Faces (1955) on its cover. Between 1958 and 1963 the “Neo-Dada” moniker was picked up and used extensively by critics worldwide. Initially intended to describe the attempts of artists in the late 1950s—between Abstract Expressionism and Pop art—to transform a subjective painterly field through collage and assemblage strategies that incorporated everyday objects. The concept “Neo-Dada,” used mostly in the context of art criticism, suggested that the new generation was reprising the strategies of the Dada movement. The original term Dada defined a spirit of protest initiated by an international group of artists who came together in 1916, at the height of World War I, in Zurich in neutral Switzerland. The complexity of this historical background suggests the fallacy of reusing the concept of “Dada” to refer to the work of American artists at the dawn of the 1960s, most of whom seized found materials with an unbridled optimism....

Article

Matico Josephson

American art gallery in New York founded in 1952 that hosted an important annual group show in the 1950s and set the stage for the emergence of Pop art in New York by 1960. Eleanor Ward, the gallery’s founder, had worked for a Parisian fashion house before returning to New York to open the gallery, first located in a former livery stable at 7th Avenue and 58th Street. However, in December 1951, Ward first opened a holiday gift shop inside a mannequin showroom. The Stable Gallery’s first exhibition opened at the same location the following spring. The stable was ideal for displaying oversized artworks and lent the gallery the feeling of an industrial space or an artist’s rented studio. From 1953 to 1957, the Stable hosted an annual artist-organized group show of painting and sculpture (the “Stable Annual”), which served as an informal salon for New York’s avant-garde.

In the 1950s, the Stable Gallery held exhibitions of the works of ...