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Article

Tunisian, 20th century, male.

Born 26 May 1921, in Tunis.

Painter, miniaturist. Genre scenes, local scenes, figures. Wall decorations, stage sets, designs for stained glass.

Jélal Ben Abdallah was a student at the school of fine art in Tunis. Initially he was a miniaturist, having studied traditional Islamic art and developed an oriental style, often defined as Tunisian. He portrays the traditions and ceremonies of Tunisian life in a make-up inspired by the ancient miniatures, using a range of warm ochres and soft browns. He also proved himself to be capable of adapting the images from these miniatures to a much larger format, that of murals, especially popular in the banks of Tunisia. His pleasant illustrations of Tunisian traditions are very popular with the public. As well as a certain ease of style and subject-matter, he can also achieve a certain poetic vein in his work....

Article

Gordon Campbell

Product of a technique first used in ancient Egypt and later developed in ancient Rome. The outer of two superimposed layers of glass was ground away to leave a pattern consisting of a pattern standing in relief on a contrasting ground, usually white on dark blue. The finest surviving example is the Portland Vase (early 1st cent. ...

Article

Muller  

Rupert Featherstone

Stone or glass implement with a flat base, used to grind paints by hand on a hard flat surface or slab. Mullers and slabs of hard stone are first recorded in ancient Egypt. Large glass mullers were used for the commercial preparation of paints until the 19th century. Pigments could be ground on their own for use in fresco or aqueous media or ground in oil for later use....

Article

Gordon Campbell

Glass that resembles semi-precious stones; made by firing a paste of crushed glass bound with water and an organic gum. The process originated in ancient Egypt, and was revived in the 1880s by the French sculptor (César-Isidore-)Henri Cros, who in 1891 was provided with a studio at the Sèvres Porcelain Factory for the production of pâte de verre. The technique was subsequently used for the production of glass vessels by Albert-Louis Dammouse and François-Emile Décorchemont.

J. Bloch-Dermant and Y. Delaborde: G. Argy-Rousseau: Glassware as Art: With a Catalogue Raisonné of the Pâtes de Verre (London and New York, 1991) The Art and Technique of Pâte de Verre (Kanagawa, 1998) J. Kervin and D. Fenton: Pâte de Verre and Kiln Casting of Glass (Livermore, CA, 2/2000) Important Pâte-de-verre by G. Argy-Rousseau (sale cat., New York, Sotheby’s, 2003) Particle Theories: International Pâte de Verre and Other Cast Glass Granulations (exh. cat. by ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b Trendelburg, May 12, 1920).

German glass painter. After military service and imprisonment by the British in Egypt, he trained in Stuttgart as a glass painter and mosaicist. Thereafter he specialized in architectural stained glass. His glass, which is usually figurative and narratorial, has been installed in more than 100 churches around the world and in secular buildings (e.g. the library extension of Pembroke College, Cambridge, ...

Article

Bruce Tattersall

The Ceramics, Cutlery and Glass on a dining-table, sometimes supplemented by decorative materials, including ornamental foodstuffs. The Western world’s earliest pictorial evidence of table settings is from the tombs of Egyptian pharaohs, in which food and its implements were among the goods deposited for use by the deceased in the afterlife (see Egypt, ancient, §XII, 3). Tableware made of pottery, and some silver, has survived from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome, and descriptive accounts of table settings, especially those for banquets, can be found in Roman literature, notably the Satyricon of Petronius (fl 1st century ad). The Roman and Byzantine practice of creating decorative effects by ornamentation of the food itself was revived in the Middle Ages, mainly in the work of confectioners and in the presentation of meat and fowl restored to a lifelike appearance after cooking. From the later Middle Ages, as banquets became a means of displaying wealth and status, the aristocracy feasted at tables elaborately decorated, as is shown in the ...