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See Schenck family

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J. J. Martín González

Spanish sculptor. He moved from Galicia to Valladolid, drawn by the presence of the Spanish court, and there he was the disciple and collaborator of Francisco Rincón. Fernández’s work in Valladolid is first documented in 1605. He created a style based on strong, vigorous figures and garments with broken, angular folds. His great ability is apparent in the carving of the hair and beards of his figures. He integrated the formal beauty found in the academic Mannerism of Pompeo Leoni and the idealized beauty of the Classical nude with deep Christian feeling. The nude figure of his ...

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See Schenck family

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See Schenck family

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Josefina Alix Trueba

Spanish sculptor. The son of a poor carpenter, he became aware of his vocation at an early age when he came into contact with the sculpture of the Mannerist and Baroque artists of Castile. At the age of 17 he entered the Escuela de Bellas Artes in Madrid but immediately demonstrated his rejection of academic teaching by joining bohemian circles. He became the friend of the most interesting realist sculptor of the day, Julio Antonio, who encouraged him to undertake journeys through the most remote and forgotten villages of Castile in an attempt to find his own roots. On these journeys, between ...

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Manfred Wundram

Name given to the stylistic phase in the art of Europe between the High Renaissance (see Renaissance, §4) and the Baroque, covering the period from c. 1510–20 to 1600. It is also sometimes referred to as late Renaissance, and the move away from High Renaissance classicism is already evident in the late works of Leonardo da Vinci and Raphael, and in the art of Michelangelo from the middle of his creative career. Although 16th-century artists took the formal vocabulary of the High Renaissance as their point of departure, they used it in ways that were diametrically opposed to the harmonious ideal it originally served. There are thus good grounds for considering Mannerism as a valid and autonomous stylistic phase, a status first claimed for it by art historians of the early 20th century. The term is also applied to a style of painting and drawing practised by artists working in Antwerp slightly earlier, from ...

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W. Iain Mackay

Spanish architect and sculptor active in Peru. He was trained as a sculptor by Cristóbal Velázquez (d 1616), a Mannerist of the school of Alonso Berruguete. He arrived in Lima c. 1599 and carved the life-sized reliefs of Christ and the Apostolate (...

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Iris Kockelbergh

Flemish sculptor. He was the son of the Antwerp painter Antoon van Mildert (d 1597), who had established himself in Köningsberg. After his father’s death he returned to Antwerp, where in 1610 he became a free master in the Guild of St Luke. The monumental alabaster chimney-piece that he made in ...

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Italian sculptor. He was a pupil of Giambologna in Florence, as he stated in a testimony in which he accused his master of impiety. He settled in Naples in 1573 and for half a century was the city’s leading sculptor. In 1575–7 he worked on the statue of the ...

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Johannes Ramharter

German sculptor. His work, mostly in wood and in ivory, draws its inspiration not only from German Renaissance sculpture but more noticeably from Italian Baroque painting and sculpture; the most crucial influence of all, however, is derived from Flemish paintings, particularly those of Peter Paul Rubens. He was the son of ...

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Johannes Ramharter

German sculptor. He was probably the son of Christoph Rodt (fl 1577–1627), a cabinetmaker; the style of his numerous sculptures suggests that he trained in the workshop of Hans Leonhard Waldburger (c. 1543–1622), who was employed by the court of the Archduke Ferdinand (brother of the emperor Maximilian I). Rodt’s earliest datable work is the high altar (...

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German family of sculptors and wood-carvers. The brothers (1) Hans Schenck and (2) Christoph Schenck were wood-carvers, working in the Lake Constance area from c. 1612. Their work, early Baroque in style, represented a departure from the Mannerist traditions of the region. Christoph’s son (3) Johann Christoph Schenck took over his father’s workshop and worked in a more soft and flowing style. Johann Christoph’s son ...

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German, 17th century, male.

Died 1691, in Constance.

Sculptor. Religious subjects.

Schenck, whose work had certain similarities with Baroque, was inspired by the traditions of mannerism, which prevailed in the region of Lake Constance. Particularly notable is the powerful musculature of his figures carved in wood....

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German, 17th century, male.

Born in Freiberg (Saxony); died after 1631.

Sculptor.

Stenelt was active in Osnabrück in the service of Prince Bishop Philippe Sigismond, mainly sculpting Renaissance-Baroque-style tombs. His works can be seen in Münster and Osnabrück Cathedrals.